The US Supreme Court Thread - Post Roe v. Wade reversal edition

Discussion in 'Politics & Current Events' started by argentine soccer fan, Jun 27, 2022.

  1. Auriaprottu

    Auriaprottu Member+

    Atlanta Damn United
    Apr 1, 2002
    The back of the bus
    Club:
    Atlanta
    Nat'l Team:
    --other--
    The idea is to have Black representation, not just Dem.

    In this state, "Dem" does not necessarily mean " committed to eliminating antiBlack prejudice at every level, sniffing for it even when some would claim it's not there..." a level of wokeness that a lot of White people who are Dems do not display. In this environment, vigilance is a must.
     
  2. Funkfoot

    Funkfoot Member+

    May 18, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    True, but I expect the dems will nominate an AA candidate, right? I guess we'll see.
     
  3. Yoshou

    Yoshou Fan of the CCL Champ

    May 12, 2009
    Seattle
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    #2053 Yoshou, Oct 6, 2023
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2023
    But that is my point. This type of person is such a small percentage of the homeless population that it shouldn’t even be mentioned. However, it is often brought up by people who don’t really want to address homelessness. Roadkit’s comment comes up all the time during discussions about how to address homelessness and it is almost always from people who want to step up sweeps and not fund housing.

    The people that refuse housing almost always do it because “housing” often means shelters and while shelters mean a roof over their heads, it also means barracks style living, so little to no privacy abd there is a risk of their stuff being stolen, or if they have a lot of stuff, it means they have to find somewhere to put that stuff.

    Or, if it is individual housing, there are a ton of requirements that come along with that, like being clean, that they view as being onerous or unrealistic.
     
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  4. JohnR

    JohnR Member+

    Jun 23, 2000
    Chicago, IL
    That makes sense. But what's the prognosis for homeless people who accept housing only on condition that they will not promise to be clean? It's a rhetorical question, because I only know the answer for the two homeless people whom I personally knew. And in their case the prognosis was answer was that they would drink and expect somebody else would cover for them, if they didn't show up for work. Which is how they ended up homeless, because after a while employers would not hire them, their wives and friends got tired of cleaning up their messes, and then they were alone and without money.

    But again, a sample size of two. Maybe they were very unusual cases.
     
  5. dapip

    dapip Member+

    Sep 5, 2003
    South Florida
    Club:
    Millonarios Bogota
    Nat'l Team:
    Colombia
    Apropos Airbnb:

    https://apple.news/A4WhfoIIdQYOlD99oiDZelg


    In the past decade or so, the neighborhood has undergone as dizzying a process of gentrification as a place can. The median sales price of a condo nearly doubled; the median sales price of a single-family home more than tripled. The share of Black residents dropped from 60 percent to 40 percent; the share of white residents increased from 15 percent to 33 percent. The neighborhood became less socioeconomically diverse, home to fewer immigrants, fewer families, and more single people. It became less like the old New York and more like the new New York, which is to say more like Greenwich or Short Hills—a place where family wealth or a job on Wall Street are table stakes.

    Airbnb is not responsible for Bed-Stuy’s transformation; the city’s extreme housing shortage and sky-high wealth inequality are the central, obvious culprits. But the “sharing economy’s” entry into real estate did not exactly help. An analysis earlier this year by the advocacy and data group Inside Airbnb and the publication Gothamist found that Bed-Stuy had the highest concentration of Airbnb listings of any neighborhood in the city. In one six-by-four-block area, there were 87 Airbnbs. That’s 87 apartments decorated in Ikea and auctioned off night after night to people with no investment in the neighborhood. That’s 87 families that could have lived in Bed-Stuy, moved to Bed-Stuy, stayed in Bed-Stuy.

    Some Airbnbs, to be fair, were owned and inhabited by people who were defraying their own housing costs. But many of the city’s Airbnbs were full-time short-stay units. They were hotel rooms, not homes, owned by investors, not families. And there were 39,000 of them, displacing 100,000 New Yorkers, give or take.
     
  6. Yoshou

    Yoshou Fan of the CCL Champ

    May 12, 2009
    Seattle
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Hmm. Good question, but Housing First is definitely one of the “preferred” options for treating homelessness. Getting a roof over someone’s headed is an important step to making them available to treatment. For one, you know where they are so can come visit them and, at least, offer to help them address their addiction needs.

    There is also some evidence that providing housing to alcoholics and drug addicts reduces their overall costs as they are less likely to require police intervention and less likely to make emergency room visits. They may also reduce the amount of alcohol/drugs they consume.

    https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/183666

     
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  7. ceezmad

    ceezmad Member+

    Mar 4, 2010
    Chicago
    Club:
    Chicago Red Stars
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    In California?

    I didn't know that
     
  8. ceezmad

    ceezmad Member+

    Mar 4, 2010
    Chicago
    Club:
    Chicago Red Stars
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    But political preference is not a protected class, so it's "easy" to pack 40% black voters in a Republican district.
     
  9. ceezmad

    ceezmad Member+

    Mar 4, 2010
    Chicago
    Club:
    Chicago Red Stars
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Isn't that better than living in the street?

    There has to be more than that, there is a reason many homeless want to live inside expensive big cities and not out in the cheaper country side

    Connections to people and places they know, more access to cash and probably convenient access to services and products.
     
  10. rslfanboy

    rslfanboy Member+

    Jul 24, 2007
    Section 26
    There are no services in the countryside. Cities use money to tackle the homeless problem. The countryside kicks them out, even drives them or puts them in buses, to get them out of their town and into the city.
     
  11. Auriaprottu

    Auriaprottu Member+

    Atlanta Damn United
    Apr 1, 2002
    The back of the bus
    Club:
    Atlanta
    Nat'l Team:
    --other--
    I didn't see this post until now, sorry. I'm sure that's the idea. I mean, yeah, the Dems can nominate whoever they want to, but it would help to run a Black candidate in such a heavily Black district.

    But it doesn't mean they'll win. The districting was drawn funny to begin with, which is why they have the change now. That part of Alabama is in the Black (soil) Belt. Plenty of majority Black towns and counties there. Selma's part of it, and so is Montgomery (the soil). Sewell's seat has been Dem and Black for some time. IIRC, a Black man held the seat before she got it. Conservatives probably figure they can eventually take both districts, and they may be right.
     
  12. Yoshou

    Yoshou Fan of the CCL Champ

    May 12, 2009
    Seattle
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Yes.. The number of people that choose to be homeless as a lifestyle is exceedingly small compared to all of the other reasons people are homeless..
     
  13. Yoshou

    Yoshou Fan of the CCL Champ

    May 12, 2009
    Seattle
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    #2063 Yoshou, Oct 8, 2023
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2023
    Not really. The homeless own so few things that having something stolen can have a bigger impact Not to mention the lack of privacy. Also, 24/7 shelters are fairly rare, or, at least, shelters where someone can stay inside 24/7, sleep in the same bed, etc, are pretty rare. A lot of shelters require overnighters to be out of the shelter by a certain time of day and don’t allow them back in until a certain time. Compare that to an encampment where they can have some degree of privacy inside a tent, can stay in a single place for weeks at a time, etc. as long as they can stay dry and warm being homeless “on the streets” can be better than shelter living.

    There’s actually a decent per capita number of homeless that do live in the countryside. Aside from more services being available in cities, homelessness is just less visible in the countryside. For one, there is less people in the countryside, so less eyes to see the homeless. For two, the presence of clusters of trees and bushes and lack of roads means it is easier to make you camp “invisible”. For three, lower housing costs means larger homes and property, so someone who is experiencing homelessness can find it easier to find a friend that will let them
    “couchsurf”, or that has an outbuilding they can live in, or a spot on their property they can park a trailer/camper/rv on, etc.
     
  14. superdave

    superdave Member+

    Jul 14, 1999
    VB, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    My experience (and I DO have experience, albeit limited to rural eastern NC) is that in rural communities, kinship ties are very strong, so almost* nobody sleeps in a car or the woods, they just move in with relatives. It’s not that but if a deal if the homeless is a single individual. But too often it’s families doubling up and being very overcrowded in a modest home.

    *I heard of dozens of doubled up families but literally never heard of anyone sleeping in the woods, but I’ll throw in the “almost” to avoid pedantic arguments about absolutes.
     
  15. ceezmad

    ceezmad Member+

    Mar 4, 2010
    Chicago
    Club:
    Chicago Red Stars
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I didn't know that California had drug testing requirements, isn't that what you replied to.
     
  16. Yoshou

    Yoshou Fan of the CCL Champ

    May 12, 2009
    Seattle
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Unless California has outlawed it, it generally falls on the group running the housing operation to set the rules of who can and can’t be in their units. Many of the orgs have rules about being clean because it is a way to combat claims that the housing will increase crime in the area.
     
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  17. soccernutter

    soccernutter Moderator
    Staff Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    Aug 22, 2001
    Near the mountains.
    Club:
    Tottenham Hotspur FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Going back to the first comment in this discussion.

    https://www.businessinsider.in/poli...ment-a-study-found-/articleshow/104188931.cms

    Denver experimented with giving people $1,000 a month. It reduced homelessness and increased full-time employment, a study found.

    Some interesting results to this one.

    Last October, more than 800 people were enrolled in the basic income plan, but they did not all receive the same stipend. There are three groups: One receives $1,000 a month for a year; another receives $6,500 up front and then $500 a month from there; and another gets just $50 a month.

    To start:

    While cautioning that this is only an interim report for what is a yearlong study, the researchers nonetheless found stark and encouraging changes in participants' material conditions. Those that received $500 or more per month saw the biggest gains. At the start, fewer than 10% were living in their own home or apartment, while at the six-month point, more than a third lived in their own housing.

    That is a rather sizable improvement in just 6 months. Interim, but still.

    The guaranteed income also dramatically reduced visible homelessness. When the initiative began, some 6% of the people in the $1,000/month group were sleeping outside; the number fell to zero six months later. The group that received a large lump sum similarly reported a decline from 10% sleeping outdoors to 3%.

    Bump the amount up from $500 to $1000, and that drops the number significantly. Further, providing a lump sum is also a significant improvement. And Denver is not cheap, either. It's not LA or San Fran or NYC, but it's not Indianapolis or Birmingham, either.

    Granted, this is only interim, and is a small group, but this seems to say that with money, people will choose not to be unhoused.

    Regarding mental illness, it doesn't address that specifically, but there is this:

    For all groups, the number sleeping in shelters was more than halved, and all reported increased feelings of safety in their current sleep location. Overall mental health also improved, though the group that received $50 reported slightly more stress and anxiety than before — and a little less hope.

    Also, this study is not alone and there are a few others linked in the article.
     
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  18. soccernutter

    soccernutter Moderator
    Staff Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    Aug 22, 2001
    Near the mountains.
    Club:
    Tottenham Hotspur FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I don't have the data now, but when I was working in a prison (a "go home" yard), one of the requirements was that everybody go through a rehab program, designed by social workers and psychologists who were also in recovery. But the recidivism rate was 70%, and that was largely because of the lack of housing and support upon release. Those type of services were available to only about 10% of those being released, IIRC.
     
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  19. Yoshou

    Yoshou Fan of the CCL Champ

    May 12, 2009
    Seattle
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Was that because it literally wasn’t available, or because those released were blocked from the housing because of their criminal records?
     
  20. soccernutter

    soccernutter Moderator
    Staff Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    Aug 22, 2001
    Near the mountains.
    Club:
    Tottenham Hotspur FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Because it laterally wasn't available. Back then, it was the first time that I learned substance abuse recovery programs would cost the state $1 to every $7 for incarcerating the same group. Pre-pandemic that number was still roughly the same.
     
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  21. roadkit

    roadkit Greetings from the Fringe of Obscurity

    Jul 2, 2003
    Fornax Cluster
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I'm not surprised by this being in Denver. You can die from exposure if you are homeless in Denver. Not the case in coastal California.
     
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  22. Cascarino's Pizzeria

    Apr 29, 2001
    New Jersey, USA
    I always open this thread thinking "what grifting has Clarence done now?"
     
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  23. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    Yeah. Kinda like the Dick Cheney thread. That one always got my hopes up.
     
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  24. Deadtigers

    Deadtigers Member+

    Jul 23, 2015
    Independent Republic of the Bronx, NY
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    Nat'l Team:
    Ghana
  25. Funkfoot

    Funkfoot Member+

    May 18, 2002
    New Orleans, LA
    They refuse to believe that the parties are split along racial lines, at least in South Carolina. They already decided racism doesn't exist any longer.
     

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