Official Charlie Davies News/Updates Thread 3.0

Discussion in 'Yanks Abroad' started by Illusionbox, Aug 23, 2007.

  1. Hed7181

    Hed7181 Member

    Jul 1, 2003
    VA Beach, VA
    Club:
    New England Revolution
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I'm pretty sure the idea of starting Charlie Davies alone up top in a 4-5-1 was probably not exactly playing to his strengths, either.
     
  2. Raptor Coach

    Raptor Coach New Member

    Aug 28, 2007
    I think you all need to relax and let Charlie get use to the system of play, the players around him and the place he lives. Once he is use to all this he will settle down and play his game which is what you all expect. How do I know this I will tell you Charlie played for me on 7 different teams from like 11 years of age till 15, ate, slept and hung around my house. He is a great person and a great player and you will see that shine through shortly.
     
  3. Bruce S

    Bruce S Member+

    Sep 10, 1999
    he is a small, quick guy. It is odd to play him as a lone forward. Clearly that is not his game and I would be surprised if it is ever his game.
     
  4. Missionary

    Missionary Member

    Jul 13, 2003
    Mission Viejo
    Club:
    Los Angeles Galaxy
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Charlie was over hyped. He is just out of college and needs time to develop. He is a prospect that needs time to learn. Be patient and revisit this issue in 2 years.
     
  5. sidefootsitter

    sidefootsitter Member+

    Oct 14, 2004
    Any highlights?

    That old Swedish video site is now kicking all the non-Swedes out.
     
  6. Lorelaei

    Lorelaei New Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    Stockholm
    Don't know what the old site was, but http://www.viasatsport.se, then "Klicka här för mer webb-TV" and then the first clip that comes up. "Summering Hammarby - AIK".
     
  7. mschofield

    mschofield Member+

    May 16, 2000
    Berlin
    Club:
    Union Berlin
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    Not really sure that this is the place for this, but I think what we heard from the manager regarding young CD has applied to other young Americans, and it is not a poor or a postive reflection on them, merely a fact of different footie cultures. there's a big gap between being a good footballer and a good professional footballer. there might not be much of a talent difference, and the former can always step on the field and create a couple decent performances. but over time, players who are not fully professional in their approach cost their teams, and annoy the heck out of their manager/fans.
    It's not fatal, in any way, and is much more easily overcome than other short comings (say lack of speed or strength, lack of technical ability, or understanding of the game). it's an attitude that you're heading off to work, and you have to earn your pay all the time. Every second on the field, for games or practice requires you to prove your worth. every second off the field, requires you to be doing what benefits the club, eating right, getting the proper sleep, proper relaxation. it's gearing everything to the club, and fitting in around the corners the other stuff you want in life _ but only after you've fully taken care of business.
    Partially, it's about fear, knowing that there are hundreds of players, who may not be as talented, but are certainly capable of taking your spot if you slow down, even for a minute (and this doesn't mean run as fast as you can, but fail to perform at a peak level).
    It takes months, if not a full year or two, to overcome. Esp for a kid coming from college, it's a different world of attitude.
    IMO, we won't see nearly as much from BF, Adu, DS, CD, etc as we want. It's not about talent, or getting a fair shot. It's about hardening up.
     
  8. sidefootsitter

    sidefootsitter Member+

    Oct 14, 2004
    It was ... a green-colored site that had a lot of ABBA links in the banners.

    But this works ... so, thank you, Ma'am/Miss.

    I got my Allsvenskan back.

    Whoo-hoo...

    PS. It wasn't a bad assist - he got on a defender quickly and managed a good flick-back ... but then you don't see him anymore.

    They went 4-5-1, right? He probably couldn't hack it as a lone forward.
     
  9. bct81

    bct81 Member+

    Mar 17, 2007
    Mass (formerly northern Virginia/Colorado)
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    well said - it is about professionalism .... at its core - in business and on the sports pitch it is about maintaining a sense of confidence and insecurity all at once - to keep yourself driven for success .. in the MLS perhaps you can mail it in a couple of games because there aren't 10 other backups breathing down your neck .. but in the European pro systems - the competition and the pay is fierce .. this is not only about a game - it is a way of life and a profession. CD and Adu and others will do well to learn that. Never mail it in - always go in hard during games and in all training.
     
  10. mschofield

    mschofield Member+

    May 16, 2000
    Berlin
    Club:
    Union Berlin
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    I think it's difficult to adjust to coming out of a system where you're clearly the best.
    I'd think you can coast again, once you've achieved superstar status, except that's not working out real well for mssrs ballack (left of the CL roster, ouch) and shrev ...
     
  11. FCmagic01

    FCmagic01 Member

    Nov 10, 2006
    Charlie doing better in training??

    anyone know
     
  12. mschofield

    mschofield Member+

    May 16, 2000
    Berlin
    Club:
    Union Berlin
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    Did they have much training during an int week?
    :confused:
     
  13. Lorelaei

    Lorelaei New Member

    Aug 22, 2007
    Stockholm

    No, they had one (probably an easy one) training session the day after the game, then there's no training until monday.
     
  14. Dr Jay

    Dr Jay BigSoccer Supporter

    Aug 7, 1999
    Newton, MA USA
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    You hit the nail on the head.

    Remember also, until Charlie went pro, he was never on a team where he wasn't the best player/leading scorer...usually by far.

    One of the major weaknesses of the US system is our very best players don't get pushed consistently day-in-day-out til they go pro. Even the ones lucky enough to go to Bradenton.

    That is why so few of our teenage phenoms can go right to the first team, even in second tier (or third tier leagues).
     
  15. Bruce S

    Bruce S Member+

    Sep 10, 1999
    this is like a Rohrschack test. We have heard one comment from the coach, we do not even know it is true, and everyone wringing there hands about the USA system. Take your prozac boys.
     
  16. freisland

    freisland Member+

    Jan 31, 2001
    I dunno Bruce - the track record for top Ams coming out of college (and I think college is the issue more than the "us system") into Euro leagues is not great. Not completely gawd-awful, but not exciting either. Gooch's short time at Metz can be blamed on a coaching change. Hill has not caught fire in the B1. Benny has fared a bit better, but still not great. Dolo was a nice success, starting the B2 first. Yi, not so good. Charlie etc. etc.

    I've had this debate with others, but I think that in most cases, US college holds back a professional career. It is simply not specfic and intense enough.
     
  17. mschofield

    mschofield Member+

    May 16, 2000
    Berlin
    Club:
    Union Berlin
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    That's not true, though, is it? we've heard similar comments from hamburg about BR, Reading about Convey, we heard them this week from benfica about Adu, we even got similar sentiments about Mathis, Bease and Donovan, despite initial success. there are others, we discuss them all the time on here.

    We can, and usually do, go through each case and dismiss them as unique, but after a while it looks like a pattern. And it's not about talent, as many of the players discuss had find success. From results, their comments, their manager comments, it feels like they arrive without an understanding of being a real professional, or understanding the constant fight, in training as well as games, for a place in the team.
    I believe it is a very fix-able problem, it just takes time.
     
  18. johnh00

    johnh00 Member

    Apr 25, 2001
    CT, USA
    Club:
    New England Revolution
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Only one of your examples went to college (Mathis), and he was several years removed from it, so I don't know that this is good support for Friesland's argument that it's the college system.

    I'm not saying that there isn't necessarily an issue with US players coming from a system where they are the "stars", into one where they are just one of many good players. I just don't see anything to convince me. As much as we have heard bad things about some of these guys, others have had the exact opposite comments made about them: Reyna, McBride, Cherundolo, etc. You hear coaches talking about the "American mentality" of always working hard.

    I'm not saying you're wrong, just that the anecdotal evidence isn't strong enough to convince me. Is this problem also in place for players from other countries? I've got to think that most players coming in from a smaller league to one of the big 4 was a star in that league. That's why they are brought in. Do they also have problems? Is it cultural, or is the amount of flameouts of guys coming in who starred in the domestic youth leagues comparable?

    Lee
     
  19. freisland

    freisland Member+

    Jan 31, 2001
    Except Reyna took a couple of years (and a transfer out of Bayer) to get settled. McBride was fighting to hold on in the B2 etc. Dolo started in the B2. Now, tons of players start in lesser leagues and work their way up. It's the relatively rare player who walks into a top starting 11 at 20 or 21 and is an automatic starter, but looking at schof's post, it may be more than a college thing. I wouldn't be surprised if one of our number's guys did analysis of the transition time needed for our national teamers (U and sr.) to adjust to top leagues and found they took longer on average than most "similar" countries.

    Somebody grab a pocket protector!

    That said - it is also clear that competing for PT in MLS is increasing. It's one of the reason more players are looking and will look to Europe. Even with the addition of a couple of teams there are less "automatic starter" slots in MLS every year. That will help - as will skipping college.
     
  20. mschofield

    mschofield Member+

    May 16, 2000
    Berlin
    Club:
    Union Berlin
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    And maybe it would only take our players longer because the other guys have been in the system for a couple years when they're finally moved to the senior team, and with lower division teams before they move up to the adult table.
    I wouldn't disagree with Johnh, it's unlikely to be only an American thing. It's something everyone goes through. Which, I believe, provides the "chill out" position with good ammo. We notice the yanks, and compare them to the superstars, instead ofthe hoi poloi.
     
  21. DoctorD

    DoctorD Member+

    Sep 29, 2002
    MidAtlantic
    Club:
    Philadelphia Union
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Our low population density is the biggest factor here. While "pushing the best players" may be a weakness, it's hard to think of a system where these kids get real competition at before age 16.
     
  22. freisland

    freisland Member+

    Jan 31, 2001

    It's possible. It would be interesting to see an analysis of how quickly say, the Dutch U-20 or U-17 pool moves into the big 4 vs. the US or Ghana or English U-20 pool.

    I do think that the college guys - Benny, Davies, Gooch etc. are not helped by the few extra years of weekend soccer.
     
  23. Corn

    Corn Member

    Aug 17, 2006
    Charlie scored for the reserv team yesterday. Hammarby won with 2-1 against Gefle.
     
  24. russ

    russ Member+

    Feb 26, 1999
    Canton,NY
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States

    This sounds like you're saying that players are trying to avoid MLS competition by going to Europe-

    in which case I would suggest they just take their marketing degree and sell insurance instead.
     
  25. golazo68

    golazo68 Member+

    Dortmund
    United States
    May 21, 2004
    Brazil
    Given that's the equivelent of scoring for the MLS reserves vs. another MLS reserve team.......I'm not too excited.

    Good to know though! :)
     

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