News & Media II: Articles, photos, videos, etc.

Discussion in 'USA Women: News and Analysis' started by Bonnie Lass, Jan 26, 2009.

  1. Klingo3034

    Klingo3034 Member

    Dallas FC
    United States
    Oct 11, 2019
    https://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2019/03/olivia-moultrie-feature

    Legacy in the making

    It all started for Moultrie a few years ago at a UNC women’s soccer summer ID camp — a camp designed to find young talent.

    “She ripped it up,” North Carolina head coach Anson Dorrance said. “She was excellent. The dad (K.C. Moultrie) basically approached us, and says, ‘You know, Anson, I’d love for her to commit to the University of North Carolina,’ and I said, ‘No problem.’”

    Although she was young, Dorrance thought she was worth the gamble.

    “Like the Nike ad is saying, is this crazy?” Dorrance said. “Well, maybe, but you know, maybe not.”

    The soccer phenom started specialized training when she was seven years old, later than most players nowadays. She was a quick learner. By fifth grade, Moultrie’s parents started home schooling her, allowing her to focus on soccer. The young girl trained abroad at youth academies for European clubs like Bayern Munich and Paris Saint-Germain.

    By 11, she verbally committed to UNC and accepted a full scholarship that would amount to around $300,000.

    Moultrie is the youngest women’s soccer player to publicly accept a collegiate scholarship offer, but the commitment was originally planned to be kept secret. Dorrance and Moultrie’s parents agreed not to announce that she was going to UNC until Moultrie was much older.

    However, as more collegiate coaches reached out to her current coach, the recruitment became too much. Her father reached out to Dorrance, and they agreed to go public.

    “Then, of course, there’s a media storm like this one because of how young she was,” Dorrance said.

    In December 2017, Moultrie posted on Instagram and announced her decision to play soccer at UNC. After that moment, her life completely changed. The media became fixated on the young star, and the publicity grew, the very thing Moultrie’s parents and Dorrance had tried to prevent.
     
  2. FanOfFutbol

    FanOfFutbol Member+

    May 4, 2002
    There are other things that cause girls (I am sure there are similar things for boys) that cause sometimes very promising youngsters to leave soccer and other sports as they pass trough puberty. I have had extremely gifted girls decide to go in a completely direction from her possible sports career. The most promising goalkeeper I ever coached decide to dedicate herself to raising a family and being a simple housewife and mother right after graduating high school even though she had several scholarship possibilities. I have stayed in contact with her and I cannot say she made a bad choice. She has been one of the best I have seen at raising four kids and a husband. And NO she did not have to get married. Her first child came about 2 years after marriage.

    We, as soccer fans and fans of other sports, often forget that there is more to life than sports and that "more" can really be more important than soccer. As much as that seems nearly blasphemous it is often quite true.
     
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  3. jackdoggy

    jackdoggy Member+

    May 16, 2014
    Big D
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    And I, as jackdoggy, will never forget that there is nothing more important in life than the United States Women's National Soccer Team.
     
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  4. hotjam2

    hotjam2 Member+

    Nov 23, 2012
    Club:
    Real Madrid
    This article doesn’t mention the Nike contract she signed which makes her now ineligible for UNC. Couple of questions;
    How much is the Nike contract worth?

    did the parents NOT want the media attention? After all, it’s what led to the Nike contract

    how much money in total did the parents spend on her before getting the Nike contract? Here you got to add all the summer camps as well the trips to Europe to practice with top pro clubs(Barca’s camp is around $12k) plus they build a soccer turf field in their own back yard that cost them $60K?)

    does it really cost $300K to go to UNC? Maybe the 1st year can be expensive, but then a student should be able to qualify for in state tuition & all the other perks that go with it
     
  5. BostonRed

    BostonRed Member+

    Oct 9, 2011
    Somerville, MA
    Club:
    New England Revolution
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Living at the school usually doesn't qualify you for in-state tuition.

    From UNC:

    FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT NC RESIDENCY FOR TUITION PURPOSES

    What does the law say? In layman's terms, North Carolina law says that a person who wishes to be classified as an in-state resident for tuition purposes must have lived in North Carolina for at least one calendar year AND show intent to maintain permanent legal residence in North Carolina. Simply residing in the state is not enough. A student must show permanent ties to North Carolina by proving that he/ she has abandoned any previous state of residence. A person may not have more than one legal residence (domicile) at one time. A person may not be considered for in-state if he/she has lived in North Carolina for less than one year.

    What does this mean to me? A student must prove his/her their intent to be a permanent legal resident of North Carolina. This means he/she must establish ties to North Carolina including maintaining a permanent residence and show that he/she has relocated to North Carolina for reasons other than educational purposes. A student cannot simply come to a North Carolina university, and indicate a claim to North Carolina residency.


    Otherwise, almost all students would qualify for in-state tuition after their 1st year.
     
  6. Klingo3034

    Klingo3034 Member

    Dallas FC
    United States
    Oct 11, 2019
    #3631 Klingo3034, Jun 5, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2020
    I apologize, the article does mention about it. Its just not being mentioned by me when i quoted the important parts IMO, since we already know about the Nike contract. Obviously the story was mentioned prior to talking about the contract. Nobody knows the amount since its not disclosed. But its enough for her to skip college. Just like Mallory Pugh. If you have a young daughter or son, Wasserman looks like the agency to go to.

    https://www.si.com/soccer/2017/04/18/mallory-pugh-ucla-womens-soccer-turning-pro-nwsl
    Multiple sources told SI.com that Pugh was set to sign with Wasserman agent Richard Motzkin. She is planning to meet soon with Nike and Adidas, who will be in heated competition to get Pugh’s signature.

    According to NWSL rules, the Washington Spirit has the first crack at Pugh through the league’s allocation process. But SI.com has learned that Washington is not a preferred destination for Pugh.

    Three sources close to the situation told SI.com that Portland was one of Pugh’s preferred destinations in the NWSL. But multiple sources said that destinations in France, including Lyon and PSG, were also in play if Pugh was not satisfied with what the NWSL was willing to offer.

    https://www.si.com/soccer/2019/05/29/olivia-moultrie-pro-us-soccer-nwsl-portland-thorns-nike
    For the Moultries, college was always the plan. Until Olivia kept improving. The U-14 national team called. Nike and Adidas sent free gear. Spencer Wadsworth, the agent who reps Heath and Horan at Wasserman Media Group, reached out. He’d seen Moultrie’s clips on YouTube—the ones little girls now mimic, of Olivia with the ball magnetized to her feet, launching benders—and so he met with the Moultries. He invited Olivia to pickup games in Playa Vista with Stu Holden and Steve Nash. Like Dorrance, Wadsworth saw a tiny Tobin Heath. And he was all in, despite her age. “My boss thought I was crazy,” says Wadsworth. “I was like, You have to see her play, see her mentality. We can push the limits.”

    https://www.sbnation.com/soccer/201...-uswnt-nwsl-psg-lyon-portland-thorns#comments
    Why now?
    The biggest factor in Pugh making this decision now, rather than last season or putting it off for another year, seems to be the USWNT collective bargaining agreement. Under the old deal, Pugh would have made in the high-five or low-six figures as a full-time national team player. Under the new deal, she should make $200,000 per year or more.

    So if Olivia Moultrie combine with the Nike contract and IF she's able to make the senior national team, making 200k a year, well she makes more money than most female soccer players that would have graduated from UNC except for those unique players like Mia Hamm or Tobin Heath. Thats not to say they couldn't be as successful, it just takes a little more time.
     
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  7. Klingo3034

    Klingo3034 Member

    Dallas FC
    United States
    Oct 11, 2019
    Oh they did want the media attention, but I think they were waiting for opportunities. Because if you show commitment to an institution, other institutions could have backed off. Since they already got what they wanted with UNC, they decided to make it public since they are being constantly asked by other coaches what are her plans and are they interested in their school. Is Barca camp really 12k? Pay to play eh? This is being paid to be scouted. Smart for the family to try hard to get attention through videos too. Not unusual for other athletes instead of constantly have to pay for it to get scouted.
     
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  8. Klingo3034

    Klingo3034 Member

    Dallas FC
    United States
    Oct 11, 2019
    https://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/27/...tion=click&module=RelatedLinks&pgtype=Article

    A fascinating insight into how college coaches approach the young girls to build up their super team. This is not the whole article I'm posting here. Just partial. You can read the rest in link.

    SANFORD, Fla. — Before Haley Berg was done with middle school, she had the numbers for 16 college soccer coaches programmed into the iPhone she protected with a Justin Bieber case.

    She was all of 14, but Hales, as her friends call her, was already weighing offers to attend the University of Colorado, Texas A&M and the University of Texas, free of charge.

    Haley is not a once-in-a-generation talent like LeBron James. She just happens to be a very good soccer player, and that is now valuable enough to set off a frenzy among college coaches, even when — or especially when — the athlete in question has not attended a day of high school. For Haley, the process ended last summer, a few weeks before ninth grade began, when she called the coach at Texas to accept her offer of a scholarship four years later.

    “When I started in seventh grade, I didn’t think they would talk to me that early,” Haley, now 15, said after a tournament late last month in Central Florida, where Texas coaches showed up to watch her juke past defenders, blond ponytail bouncing behind.

    “Even the coaches told me, ‘Wow, we’re recruiting an eighth grader,’ ” she said.

    In today’s sports world, students are offered full scholarships before they have taken their first College Boards, or even the Preliminary SAT exams. Coaches at colleges large and small flock to watch 13- and 14-year-old girls who they hope will fill out their future rosters. This is happening despite N.C.A.A. rules that appear to explicitly prohibit it.

    The heated race to recruit ever younger players has drastically accelerated over the last five years, according to the coaches involved. It is generally traced back to the professionalization of college and youth sports, a shift that has transformed soccer and other recreational sports from after-school activities into regimens requiring strength coaches and managers.

    The practice has attracted little public notice, except when it has occasionally happened in football and in basketball. But a review of recruiting data and interviews with coaches indicate that it is actually occurring much more frequently in sports that never make a dime for their colleges.

    Early scouting has also become more prevalent in women’s sports than men’s, in part because girls mature sooner than boys. But coaches say it is also an unintended consequence of Title IX, the federal law that requires equal spending on men’s and women’s sports. Colleges have sharply increased the number of women’s sports scholarships they offer, leading to a growing number of coaches chasing talent pools that have not expanded as quickly. In soccer, for instance, there are 322 women’s soccer teams in the highest division, up from 82 in 1990. There are now 204 men’s soccer teams.

    “In women’s soccer, there are more scholarships than there are good players,” said Peter Albright, the coach at Richmond and a regular critic of early recruiting. “In men’s sports, it’s the opposite.”
     
  9. lil_one

    lil_one Member+

    Nov 26, 2013
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    If you're a podcast listener, I recently became aware of a second Equalizer podcast besides the main news/analysis one called "Kickin Back." On it, of the USWNT players/coaches, Jeff Kassouf has already interviewed Jill Ellis, Becky Sauerbrunn, and Crystal Dunn.

    Here's the link to the Jill Ellis one, which I think is pretty insightful: https://equalizersoccer.com/2020/04/20/kickin-back-with-jill-ellis-debut-podcast/
     
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  10. hotjam2

    hotjam2 Member+

    Nov 23, 2012
    Club:
    Real Madrid
    Things are different in my crappy state; either a change in drivers licenses/car tag/utilities bill will do. But then again the cost of an semester in our three D1 schools is only around $7K(before some sort of scholarships kick in).
     
  11. jackdoggy

    jackdoggy Member+

    May 16, 2014
    Big D
    Nat'l Team:
    United States

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