COVID-19 and coaching

Discussion in 'Coach' started by elessar78, Jun 27, 2020.

  1. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    1. Stretch your lines so the players are 6 feet apart. Use cones.

    2. Use half pressure for 1v1. Require the defender to not approach closer than 6 feet. The defender will still be reacting to clues, just not approaching as close. The attacker will still be reacting to visual cues. Actually is a good vehicle for trying out new moves.
     
    elessar78 repped this.
  2. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Our state association brought on a professor of Immunology from the area on to speak in a "Town Hall" for a video conference. It was really illuminating. The Professor is also a soccer dad so, at the end, he gave an honest answer of balancing his role as a scientist and as a father. He gave really good background on the virus, protocols, and what to expect moving forward (re: vaccines). For me, I really liked it because the talk was given to/for a soccer player/coach/parent model.

    DM me if you want the link to the video. I don't want to post it publicly.
     
    rca2 repped this.
  3. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Our governor just made a "strong recommendation" to shut down sports until Jan 1 and (maybe) we're one of the better states in terms of managing the spread (despite very vocal resistance from what is probably the minority of residents). For soccer, it feels a bit harsh but I don't know if right now is the time to be surgical with what we're cutting out. Cleaver is probably the more appropriate tool right now.

    Football, water polo, cross country, volleyball (indoor) should probably be not played.
     
  4. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    @elessar78 I would think cross country training would be about as safe as a sport can be. Keep a 100 yards between runners and I don't think there would be a problem. (There is some information online about safe running outdoors.) Meets on the other hand are risky.
     
  5. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    if I recall my cross Country days correctly, we trained in packs and race starts were rather bunched, even in the course runners would be in small packs of 4(?) sometimes more. So that's a lot of heavy breathing around each other for multiple minutes? Not sure how the inhalation of virus particles works since you'll have run away from where you breathed too
     
  6. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    elessar78 repped this.
  7. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC

    Additionally, an argument can be made that one is racing the clock—not other racers. Although logistically more difficult at youth/high school races—a staggered start would be better.
     
  8. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    "Staggered starts" is a great idea. If the high school has a track then staggered starts are easy for 4-8 runners. Especially if the track has a "tail" to enter and exit the oval.
     
  9. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    What would it take for you folks to resume to normal? If the medical world comes up with treatments that bring the risk and harm of Covid down to say equal to the levels of flu, would then you resume to normal?
     
  10. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    We've been practicing with regular scrimmages. There's distancing (getting better at designing sessions for it), it's outdoors and community spread is low. Coaches are masked.

    Back to normal is weird. My day job lets me work from home and I'm as if not more productive due to fewer meetings and fewer interruptions. Since before the pandemic I've been doing my shopping online as much as I can. I like it now that I can drive up and target will just throw my purchases in the trunk.

    My kids are doing online learning though despite the option of in person school. My older kid said she really liked online learning (hence the soccer—she needs kids her age).

    In the general, having a vaccine helps but we live with idiots in America. The antivaxxers already weren't getting their flu shots or getting their kids vaccinated against measles, which is way more deadly than COVID. Am I having Xmas and Thanksgiving with the extended family, not if I can have my way. Unless there's a vaccine.

    We have to learn to live WITH this virus, but the way many many people in the US is not how you live with it.

    The 156k deaths is an undercount based on excess deaths that we are recording. But nothing kills this many people in 4.5 months outside of heart disease, which can't spread person to person.

    I'm okay with the way it is. I rarely go to bars and restaurants. Don't like going to stadiums for sports. I'll miss the annual rock concert I go to. Prob won't see Hamilton live for awhile. But I'd trade all that short term stuff to keep my 75 YO mother safe (and the people like her). Would trade that all so my kids don't suffer potential life long systemic damage.

    Do I feel empathy for those that need things to go back to the way they were in Feb? Sure. Most of my family is self employed. But I've also seen that other modern economies have knocked case growth down to almost zero. IfAmericans would just stop the denying and just toughen up we'd be there now too.

    During Bush 43's tenure, after 9/11 he asked what the existential threats to America were. A terrorist attack certainly wasn't it. One of the things his advisers threw back was a pandemic. The lockdown worked extremely well, but we wasted that time.
     
    CoachP365 repped this.
  11. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
  12. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    Not going to happen. This is a disease that needs to be avoided. There is a study that determined that out of a sample of 100 recovered persons, a large majority had damage to their lungs and hearts. (Two thirds of the sample recovered at home and were never hospitalized.) This will cause significant long term risks for those people as they age.
     
  13. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    i agonize(?) over this point all the time regarding long term damage. At first the vaccine didn't seem likely for at least two years. And experts said we had to learn to live with it. Now the vaccine may be here in a few months.

    Mywife is a mental health expert and the psychological damage can be very real. I'm trying to find the balance, esp for the kids—low risk activities and trying to even further reduce that risk.
     
    NewDadaCoach repped this.
  14. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    I'm glad you are taking into account the damage caused by shutdowns and stuff. (ie the unintended consequences like increases in domestic abuse, depression, etc).

    Interesting anecdote - there's a guy who plays pickup around here. In his 70s. The oldest guy out there. Playing with a bunch of younger guys. He wears a mask. He's immunocompromised. And has parkinsons. Says he has to move to fend off parkinsons effects. I mean, he could just go out and run/walk by himself, but he chooses to play soccer, even though he's in a high risk group. Apparently he must feel that doing something enjoyable and fun is worth it.
    I told my neighbor about this and she said "yeah when you get old you don't want to waste chances to enjoy life"

    it's all relative
     
  15. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    #65 elessar78, Aug 10, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2020
  16. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    #66 NewDadaCoach, Aug 11, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2020
    Myocarditis can also be caused by the virus that causes the common cold. How come you folks haven't been concerned about it until now?
    (this is a good example of the sensationalization and fear porn taking over people's minds. very sad)

    CAUSES:

    • Viruses. Many viruses are commonly associated with myocarditis, including the viruses that cause the common cold (adenovirus); COVID-19; hepatitis B and C; parvovirus, which causes a mild rash, usually in children (fifth disease); and herpes simplex virus.

      Gastrointestinal infections (echoviruses), mononucleosis (Epstein-Barr virus) and German measles (rubella) also can cause myocarditis. It's also common in people with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.
    • Bacteria. Numerous bacteria can cause myocarditis, including staphylococcus, streptococcus, the bacterium that causes diphtheria and the tick-borne bacterium responsible for Lyme disease.
    • Parasites. Among these are such parasites as Trypanosoma cruzi and toxoplasma, including some that are transmitted by insects and can cause a condition called Chagas disease. This disease is much more prevalent in Central and South America than in the United States, but it can occur in travelers and in immigrants from that part of the world.
    • Fungi. Yeast infections, such as candida; molds, such as aspergillus; and other fungi, such as histoplasma, often found in bird droppings, can sometimes cause myocarditis, particularly in people with weakened immune systems.
    Myocarditis also sometimes occurs if you're exposed to:

    • Medications or illegal drugs that might cause an allergic or toxic reaction. These include drugs used to treat cancer; antibiotics, such as penicillin and sulfonamide drugs; some anti-seizure medications; and some illegal substances, such as cocaine.
    • Chemicals or radiation. Exposure to certain chemicals, such as carbon monoxide, and radiation can sometimes cause myocarditis.
    • Other diseases. These include disorders such as lupus, Wegener's granulomatosis, giant cell arteritis and Takayasu's arteritis.
    https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/myocarditis/symptoms-causes/syc-20352539

    Also, it's peculiar that everyone is ok with athletes getting brain damage (CTE), but hey, let's shut it down for a virus that is low risk to them.
     
  17. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    You missed the point. The majority of people in the study had lung and heart damage. It isn't low risk with Covid 19.
     
  18. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Yes. To be more specific, I believe their doctors are saying this is COVID induced myocarditis.

    If this is something we potentially expose a 10/16/22 YO to for a lifetime to deal with?
     
  19. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    Keep in mind that risk from anything is never zero.

    Some quotes from the article regarding risk ---

    MacKnight said "the likelihood the individual goes on to have myocardial complication is very low"
    ....

    But he said it's helpful to keep in mind that the danger posed to athletes overall from COVID-19 is small.

    "These are healthy kids who are generally not overweight ... The risk of something awful is incredibly low,"
     
  20. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    Many things cause myocarditis. So you have been exposing kids to this risk all along, for decades. How does this make you feel?

    a quote from the article -
    "Myocarditis itself is certainly not new," Drezner said, adding that prior studies have found that myocarditis represents up to 9% of sudden cardiac deaths among athletes.
     
  21. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    We can't control random events, but we can limit exposure to infectious desease.
     
  22. CoachP365

    CoachP365 Member

    Money Grab FC
    Apr 26, 2012
    #72 CoachP365, Aug 11, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2020
    Incidence is usually estimated between 10 to 20 cases per 100,000 persons.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459259/

    Are there 100,000 Big Ten athletes? Yet they already have 5 incidents.

    To put this insoccer terms - there's a risk of 40 US players out of a pool of 4.1 million players in the US playing professionally in Europe. In Brazilians, we see 840 players in a pool of 2.1 milloin playing professionally in Europe. The risk of becoming a professional player in Europe is much higher if you are Brazilian.
     
  23. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    #73 rca2, Aug 11, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2020
    You are misinterpreting the article. The passage pertinent to viral disease says:"

    "According to some estimates, 1% to 5% of all patients with acute viral infections may involve the myocardium.

    The majority of patients are young and healthy. Individuals who are susceptible include children, pregnant women and those who are immunocompromised."

    Since it mostly attacks the young and healthy, young athletes are particularly at risk for this complication.

    It is just a game, and exposure to covid 19 an avoidable risk.
     
  24. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    You forgot the next line:
    "The overall incidence is unknown and probably underdiagnosed."

    You also forgot this line:
    "Individuals who are susceptible include children, pregnant women and those who are immunocompromised."

    Tell me - Do college athletes sound like they fall under "children, pregnant woman, immunocompromised"?
     
  25. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    #75 NewDadaCoach, Aug 12, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2020
    Young athletes are the least risk of any group ever for anything due to Covid. Get your facts straight dude. Seriously, you are spreading misinformation.
     

Share This Page