The Eyebrow's Daily Musing

Discussion in 'Youth & HS Soccer' started by Cantona's Eyebrow, May 16, 2019 at 9:21 AM.

  1. Cantona's Eyebrow

    Dirty Leeds
    Togo
    Oct 8, 2018
    I was reading over a football blog today and I came across a great quote by Roy Keane. To paraphrase, it was something along the lines of, coaches don't make great football players, it's the love affair between a child and a ball that does.

    That really struck a chord with me. The love affair between a child and a ball. To be great at something you really need to love what you do.

    I think that no matter how great a coach is, if a player has that love for football, he or she will always reach their full potential. A coaches greatness makes little difference to talented players. However, I think a truly bad coach can have a much greater impact on a talented individual. A poor coach can suck the enthusiasm, fun and motivation out of a talented kid. With very talented young players, it's only the really bad coaches that can make any kind of impact; albeit a negative one.

    So, you seasoned soccer parents, as long as Little Johnny doesn't get a clueless, monster of a coach then everything should be just dandy!
     
  2. DaBurg

    DaBurg New Member

    Liverpool FC
    Apr 18, 2019
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    This is so true. It's so difficult to get to the higher levels that the child has to love playing to get good. Being forced to do things that they don't want to do is the easiest way to ensure a player will never love the game enough to get better. They have to want to get better because it's everything.

    I was listening to the Peter Crouch podcast and it really stuck out to me how different England and the US are as far as soccer culture goes. In primary school, he reminisced about how they'd get a ball out every chance they could, and the younger kids would be playing perpendicularly to the older kids, all crammed on the same field because they didn't have enough room for all the kids who wanted to play. Here in the US we do that with basketball, sometimes kickball, which is essentially baseball with feet, but I never remember it being that way with soccer. So it's tough to develop that love of the ball like exists elsewhere. The best coaches, in my opinion, try to develop that.
     
  3. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I think you conflate criticism of systemic dysfunction with personal attacks on individual coaches.

    As a coach yourself, it's likely that that's natural and understandable. But from my POV that's what you often do.
     
    mwulf67 repped this.
  4. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I agree with you and Coach Eyebrow, but the problem as I see it is that our system doesn't really facilitate a natural love of the game. You almost need to go outside/around the youth soccer system to develop as a player.

    Our system incentives players to deliver short-term results to the benefit of coaches and clubs.
     
    mwulf67 repped this.
  5. DaBurg

    DaBurg New Member

    Liverpool FC
    Apr 18, 2019
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    You definitely have to go around the current youth system to get better. It's as much an individual sport as a team. We can't rely on the off chance that we get a coach has the right knowledge and perfect training regimen. Parents are going to have to understand that a foot on the ball is more powerful than anything. The kids aren't going outside to play the sport on their own. That's a problem. Not sure how to fix it.
     
  6. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Around here, LOTS of kids are going outside to play soccer. Just not the ones playing club soccer.

    My son did both--played club AND played pickup in the community. It was with two very distinct group of kids.
     
  7. DaBurg

    DaBurg New Member

    Liverpool FC
    Apr 18, 2019
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Sounds wonderful. Is that in a neighborhood, or like pickup games somewhere in town?
     
  8. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Well, we live in a suburban area with a large immigrant population. Once my son started playing Middle School soccer he got to know kids in the community who played pickup with older brothers, dads, uncles, etc. Even more so through High school soccer. Got to know lot of pickup players in the area--they would meet at local parks, school grounds, any open space they could find. And he would also play indoor "open gym" sessions a lot. Stayed and played after-hours a lot.

    Not saying he got nothing out of club soccer--he likely learned quite a bit about field positioning, basic tactics, etc. through his early years in club.
     

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