Shooting w/ power

Discussion in 'Youth & HS Soccer' started by ppierce34, May 2, 2019.

  1. ppierce34

    ppierce34 Member

    Aug 29, 2016
    Fort Wayne, IN
    So my poor U11G has all the tools but just cannot strike the ball with any type of consistent power. She has great footskills, fast, has a very high soccer IQ for her age, is an exceptional passer and sees the field very well. Poor thing just cant shoot all that well. She does small group trainings twice a week where they work on finishing. It just isnt working. Anyone have any tips??
     
  2. Iniesta62106

    Iniesta62106 New Member

    Sep 17, 2018
    Finishing and striking are two different skills. I don’t mean to be nit-picky but it sounds like what she is really struggling with is striking technique? Is this what her small group works on?

    If neither you nor she can see where her form is poor you should have a trainer evaluate it. He/she may need to break it down for her but once she understands the mechanics she will get it!
     
  3. ppierce34

    ppierce34 Member

    Aug 29, 2016
    Fort Wayne, IN
    The trainer (for her small group training) goes over technique but i'm wondering if he's missing something. Almost feel like she needs it to be filmed and broken down like a golf swing.
     
  4. Iniesta62106

    Iniesta62106 New Member

    Sep 17, 2018
    Yes. Most kids (people?) assume (like in golf!) more power = try to kick harder. But I think it’s more about proper approach and follow through. Maybe if you show her a slowed-down video of herself v. someone with good technique she will be able to see the difference.
     
  5. pu.ma

    pu.ma Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    Try doing drop kicks. Start with shorter distances for accuracy first. Can partner up and kick it to each other. Do it with both feet. One step plant. Simple drop. Land on kicking foot. Progress to longer distances. Doing it this way, it's a lot easier for a player to measure their progress. It translates well to striking the ball.
     
    ppierce34 repped this.
  6. ppierce34

    ppierce34 Member

    Aug 29, 2016
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Let it bounce first or out of air?
     
  7. pu.ma

    pu.ma Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    Out of the air is a lot easier. You'll get way more quality reps in.
     
  8. pu.ma

    pu.ma Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    Just wanted to add, you're not going to land on the kicking foot taking light kicks, so just step forward with the kicking foot rather than placing it beside the planting foot. After progressing to kicking with power, body should naturally lift and will have opportunity to land on kicking foot then.
     
  9. ppierce34

    ppierce34 Member

    Aug 29, 2016
    Fort Wayne, IN
    i think thats what we're missing. she strikes it well with her laces but i dont think she's getting the body lift required to land on kicking foot.
     
  10. CoachP365

    CoachP365 Member

    Business Metrics SC
    Apr 26, 2012
    From the coaching thread - I've used this with 2 boys teams

    http://www.bigsoccer.com/threads/coaching-the-instep-drive.2017965/

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=F4WXCLOQH2E
     
    Iniesta62106 repped this.
  11. Cantona's Eyebrow

    Dirty Leeds
    Togo
    Oct 8, 2018
    Agree with the first paragraph, disagree with the second.

    Striking a ball and finishing aren't necessarily the same thing. Good finishing requires the most appropriate technique, being well executed, depending on the situation. This could be finishing with the inside of the foot, outside, poking with the toe, or striking the ball through the laces.

    As Iniesta says, the usual problem in being unable to strike the ball properly isn't a lack of power, but a lack of correct technique and timing.

    I'd disagree with involving a trainer. in my opinion, this is a waste of money and unnecessary. Working on striking technique is very simple. All the player needs is a ball and a wall:

    Stand 15 yards from a wall and practice striking the ball against it. Focus on striking through the centre of the ball, with a locked ankle, toe pointed and kick through the ball. Again focusing on accuracy over power. Look at body shape and the position of the planted foot. There are lots of videos on Youtube to demonstrate proper technique. Additionally, you could also video your daughter to highlight any areas for improvement on her technique. This can be progressed onto striking a moving ball that has rebounded from the wall, or a bouncing ball that can be struck on the volley or half volley. Also, don't forget the OTHER FOOT!

    Ball and a wall and some time to practice and she'll see big improvements quickly :)
     
  12. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Perhaps. In many cases you may be right.

    But some players may have developed a poor technique and don't even realize it. With a ball and a wall, they may end up reinforcing poor mechanics and getting frustrated in the process.

    I agree with you that going to a trainer shouldn't be the default response.
     
    TheKraken repped this.
  13. TheKraken

    TheKraken Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Jun 21, 2017
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    There are two things I would measure any kid by first when I see them play. Are they a natural runner and can they kick the ball. I see many kids that can dribble through 5 defenders, but can't kick a soccer ball due to poor technique. Forget shooting. How about a simple 10 yard pass, on the ground, with some velocity? It escapes a lot of kids who are supposedly good players. I rarely see coaches working on this though at the younger ages.
     
  14. ppierce34

    ppierce34 Member

    Aug 29, 2016
    Fort Wayne, IN
    And i think free dribbling is the easiest way to determine a kids athleticism and ability. Have kids dribble around a defined area and within 5 minutes you'll easily see what you have to work with. This will cover running, dribbling technique, moves, creativity and athleticism. I'm not saying that if a kid dribbles properly and can execute a scissors against nobody you'll have a superstar on your hands but you should be able to tell if theres a soccer player somehwere in there.
     
  15. CoachP365

    CoachP365 Member

    Business Metrics SC
    Apr 26, 2012
    When he goes over technique - is it stationary like "plant your foot, throw back your arm, shift the weight, hit the ball, land on your kicking foot" and then all the finishing drills are movement based - dribble to a cone and strike, run to a cone take a pass control with 1 touch and strike. I've had plenty kids who could hammer a dead ball turn into wile e coyote like piles of body parts trying to hit a ball on the run.
     
  16. pu.ma

    pu.ma Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    I think one of the reasons a coach may not spend a lot of time on refining techniques is that young players lose focus fairly quickly when asked to do something they struggle with. So have to find activities they may enjoy that repeat certain movements, not necessarily the exact movements (say transferring weight thru when striking a ball), but ones that are part of or close to. Then build off that. Really, I think that is what you would pay for if hiring a trainer.
     

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