Батес Стеван in Russia?

Discussion in 'Yanks Abroad' started by Dave Marino-Nachison, Nov 1, 2004.

  1. Dave Marino-Nachison

    Jun 9, 1999
    Well, I know that "Батес Стеван" is hardly an American-sounding name, but it happens to be Russian for "Stevan Bates," which is hardly a Russian name. As it happens it's the name of a player for Russian club FC Alania Vladikavkaz who hails from Serbia & Montenegro.

    I try to avoid playing the name game, but I though this one was worth throwing out there to see if anyone knew anything about him.

    http://www.fc-alania.ru/player.php?id=14

    He's also played for clubs in Belgrade. He's a 1981.
     
  2. Hank Rearden

    Hank Rearden New Member

    Jul 9, 1999
    Dundee, Illinois, USA
  3. johnh00

    johnh00 Member

    Apr 25, 2001
    CT, USA
    Club:
    New England Revolution
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Where do you find this stuff, Dave?? :eek:

    Not much to add - Hank covered it pretty well. He appears to be a 22 year-old defender. He turns 23 later this month. There's a link on the page that looks like this: [задать вопрос]. That link sends you to a page where you can send an e-mail if you have a question for him. If you'd like me to help translate a question into Russian I'll give it a shot, but I'm guessing there is probably someone else around here that could do a better job: I haven't said more then hello or goodbye in Russian in over 10 years. :D

    Lee
     
  4. nicephoras

    nicephoras A very stable genius

    Jul 22, 2001
    Eastern Seaboard
    If you actually want a question sent in Russian, PM it to me.
     
  5. Dave Marino-Nachison

    Jun 9, 1999
    Maybe you could email the team and just ask what they know about Bates' lineage -- whether he has American parents or something?

    Thanks for the offer.
     
  6. nicephoras

    nicephoras A very stable genius

    Jul 22, 2001
    Eastern Seaboard
    If I have some time tonight, I'll see if I can do it.
     
  7. aloisius

    aloisius Member

    Jul 5, 2003
    Croatia
    Stevan is a very common Serbian name. Bates is an uncommon last name but it can be found in Serbia.

    Nothing to look for here, people.
     
  8. pething101

    pething101 Member

    Jul 31, 2001
    Smyrna, Ga
    Club:
    West Ham United FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    We are not going to fall for your Jedi mind trick. Keep looking.
     
  9. Hank Rearden

    Hank Rearden New Member

    Jul 9, 1999
    Dundee, Illinois, USA
    Since he has played for the S&M U-21's, even with US parents, he would have a difficult time ever being "nationalized" to the US in FIFA terms. However, it can't hurt to look.

    I think that when we find someone with the surname Bates born in Belgrade, it is fair to assume that the person has some non-Serb ancestry (likely from Great Britain or one of the former colonies). The same is true when you find a person in the US with a surname like Petrovic, that it is fair to assume they have some non-English ancestry (most likely Serbian).

    BTW: I checked the online phonebook for Telekom Srbija, and there are 7 listings for Bates in Belgrade proper (and none with English-sounding first names). So apparently there are quite a few second or third generation Serbians with the surname Bates. Quite surprising.
     
  10. Dave Marino-Nachison

    Jun 9, 1999
    I just think it's neat that those characters worked on BigSoccer. Which reminds me, I need to check in on how дамарцус беаслей is doing in Eindhoven...
     
  11. aloisius

    aloisius Member

    Jul 5, 2003
    Croatia
    His name is StevAn not StevEn. That’s about as Serbian as Predrag, Miodrag or Slobodan. His last name is probably of Hungarian origin.

    There, I’ve solved the mystery for you.
     
  12. Hank Rearden

    Hank Rearden New Member

    Jul 9, 1999
    Dundee, Illinois, USA
    Now that we are off-topic, let me add that a person born in Belgrade to an English father and a Serb mother could quite reasonably have a Serbian first name and a surname that is English. Apparently, Bates is not only an English surname - that is what surprised me.
     
  13. aloisius

    aloisius Member

    Jul 5, 2003
    Croatia
    The –es ending is quite common in Hungarian last names.
    This is a funny thread even by YA standards. Imagine if DMN or someone else contacting him…
    “hey Steve how about playing for USA…”
    :D

    But maybe your theory is correct, maybe his father is Anglophone. Not very likely but can’t exclude it 100%
     
  14. PaulGascoigne

    PaulGascoigne Member

    Feb 5, 2001
    Aotearoa/NZ
    That's close. You wrote "DaMartsus" rather than Damarcus. I guess I'm too lazy to go out and get the Russian fonts. A 'k' in its place will do.
     
  15. Dave Marino-Nachison

    Jun 9, 1999
    Ah, well... I blame the online translator I used! Probably it had never been used to translate "DaMarcus" before, whaddya think?
     
  16. Hank Rearden

    Hank Rearden New Member

    Jul 9, 1999
    Dundee, Illinois, USA
    The "ц" is typically translated as "č" rather than "ts", so actually it seems right. :)
     
  17. nicephoras

    nicephoras A very stable genius

    Jul 22, 2001
    Eastern Seaboard
    Sorry, I've been busy with work and the election, but I'll try and send out that question tonight. Now I just have to figure out where I stuck my cyrilic keyboard. :p

    Incidentally, Bates is NOT a common Russian last name at all. Unless things have changed a great deal recently.
    And while it may not be very uncommon for a Hungarian, there are very few Hungarians, and their language is radically different from any others in the area. (Plus, I don't believe "es" is a common Hungarian ending, as opposed to "is" or "us".)
     
  18. sidefootsitter

    sidefootsitter Member+

    Oct 14, 2004
    In Hungarian, it'd be probably be something like Batecz (Bah-tesh).

    And, to get rid of the Anglo-form, it'd be ~ "Batic" (Bah-teech) in Serbian.

    BTW, I'd also assume that a Russian soccer team could find someone to translate the English text. And if someone wants to write in Russian, in leiu of the Cyrilic alphabet, the English alphabet can work just as well.

    Tam vse ponimayut i tak.
     
  19. nicephoras

    nicephoras A very stable genius

    Jul 22, 2001
    Eastern Seaboard
    True, but I can use the practice.
     
  20. PaulGascoigne

    PaulGascoigne Member

    Feb 5, 2001
    Aotearoa/NZ
    No, the "ц" is prounounced "ts". I don't know enough about dictionaries to know what sound "č" is in English ("č" is Serbian for "ч" in Russian--the ch as in "church--actually the "ch" is harder in Serbian than in Russian) , but "k" is what we want here for DaMarcus' name rather than "ц".

    Trust me, you are saying we should be writing his name as DamarTSus rather than Damarcus.

    Ц, ц Like English [ts] in rats
    ПИЦЦА, ОФИЦЕР, МЕДИЦИНА, ЦИНЦИННАТИ
    (Pitsa, Ofitser, Meditsina, Tsintsinnati)

    go to the following link to learn more about the Russian alphabet:
    http://www.semiology.com/rwt/read-russian/read-russian3.html

    Phonetically, дамарцус беаслей

    really comes out to Damartsus Byeaslay.

    I would go with "Даmapkyc Биcли" as the correct Russian spelling of his name. The "и" isn't quite a long "e" that occurs twice in his last name, but it's the closest they've got. Of course when Russians wrote about him they might reverse the first and last names.

    Ciao
     
  21. sidefootsitter

    sidefootsitter Member+

    Oct 14, 2004
    I'll write a quick "I concur" and move on.
     
  22. 1953 4-2-4

    1953 4-2-4 Red Card

    Jan 11, 2004
    Cleveland
    Actually, "es" and "os" and "as" are common endings, not "us" nor "is" in Hungarian but "si" is. Take Lisztes as a name (Bremen & Hungarian player)--liszt means flour, lisztes changes it to "floury." Babos, Lantos, Puskas, Gyepes, are some HU footballers. Bates could be Hungarian, but wouldn't be like the english bates, but something like, "bah-tesh" in sound.
     
  23. nicephoras

    nicephoras A very stable genius

    Jul 22, 2001
    Eastern Seaboard
    :confused: Why would they do that? I've never seen that in the Russian language.
     
  24. sokol

    sokol Member

    Aug 4, 2004
    Fixed it for you. You probably didn't notice, but you actually wrote Datarcus Beasley.

    you could write Дамаркус Бислый and they could almost decline it. It might sound a little funny, but no matter how you spell it, a native Russian would pronounce it funny if he were reading a Russian spelling.

    Гол забит Дамaркусом Бислым!!!!!

    Well, on second thought that sounds terrible. But with the language reforms being made and the big push to avoid westernization of the Russian Language and the resistance to that by many people, I wouldn't be too surprised to see something like that in the press during the 2006 World Cup.

    And the reversing of names was and still is common, although it is becoming less so. It seemed to me that it was done when introducing someone for the first time. But that's just a sense I got and I could be totally off.
     
  25. aloisius

    aloisius Member

    Jul 5, 2003
    Croatia
    Who said anything about Bates being a Russian name? He is born in Belgrade, plays for Serbia’s U-21 and Alania Vladikavkaz.
    Bates is a Hungarian last name and there is a large Hungarian minority in the north Serbia. That’s all there is to it.
     

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