What! You Are So Reading! v. 2021

Discussion in 'Books' started by Ismitje, Jan 1, 2021.

  1. Q*bert Jones III

    Q*bert Jones III The People's Poet

    Kingston Stockade
    Feb 12, 2005
    Woodstock, NY
    Club:
    DC United
    [​IMG]

    In some ways, this is a throwback to a time when great white historians would write about great white historical figures and tell the story of how great and white and historic they were. It ignores basically all the strides made by real historians in the last 40 years to broaden the lens of history.

    But Mike Duncan is such an endearingly wonderful writer and storyteller that, just this once, I'll allow it. Hell, I'll even recommend it.
     
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  2. Chesco United

    Chesco United Member+

    DC United
    Jun 24, 2001
    Chester County, PA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Added it to my Amazon Wishlist.
     
  3. Chesco United

    Chesco United Member+

    DC United
    Jun 24, 2001
    Chester County, PA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    The Book of Lamentations by the late Mexican author Rosario Castellanos. The Chiapas born author details the conflict between the indigeneous Maya and traditional Mexicans.
     
  4. TheJoeGreene

    TheJoeGreene Member+

    Aug 19, 2012
    The Lubbock Texas
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    [​IMG]

    While Charles Duhigg's book on habit formation is more of a journalistic approach to scientific findings, James Clear is more practical in the application of those techniques to making very small changes consistently over time. I should probably get around to reading B.J. Fogg's book which has most of the actual research in it, and likely should have started there. Either way, this is an easy read and something I needed as I get lost in the ideas and often struggle to put them into practice.
     
  5. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    [​IMG]

    The Teaching Archive: A New History of Literary Study, a complicated and nuanced piece of scholarship that basically shows that the work of literary scholarship isn't the work of great men (mostly) writing influential essays and books and keynoting conferences. Well, that's part of it, but Rachel Sagner Burrma and Laura Heffernan have looked at the syllabi of some major figures and have suggested that much of that work isn't the product of networking professionals, but the outgrowth of attempts to teach (undergraduates in most cases, but the students who helped T. S. Eliot formulate the ideas that went into his first two books that featured essays that are still assigned to students today where adult students in a night school setting). One of those books where the biggest flaw, the thing I absolutely hate THE MOST about it, is that I didn't write it.
     
  6. TheJoeGreene

    TheJoeGreene Member+

    Aug 19, 2012
    The Lubbock Texas
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    [​IMG]

    An interesting read that relies on several Puritan authors, as well as a solid understanding of Greek and Hebrew, to push back against the fire & brimstone style of messaging.
     
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  7. chaski

    chaski Moderator
    Staff Member

    Mar 20, 2000
    Itchycoo Park
    Club:
    Lisburn Distillery FC
    Nat'l Team:
    Guam
    New Grub Street - George Gissing

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    130 years ago, Gissing recognized the attraction of Twitter --

    "As a rule they care for no newspapers except the Sunday ones; what they want is the lightest and frothiest of chit-chatty information—bits of stories, bits of description, bits of scandal, bits of jokes, bits of statistics, bits of foolery. Am I not right? Everything must be very short, two inches at the utmost; their attention can’t sustain itself beyond two inches. Even chat is too solid for them: they want chit-chat."
     
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  8. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    [​IMG]

    The Bassoon King: My Life in Art, Faith and Idiocy, an actor's memoir that is extraordinarily well written for a book in the genre, mostly funny and often insightful, along with a harrowing description of the successful, but nearly disastrous and fatal birth of his and his wife's child, by Rainn Wilson. The brief description of the Baha'i faith in which Wilson was raised, and which he practices to this day (he returned to it after a period of time in college and shortly after that he refers to as a "Baha'i Rumspringge" -- hilariously detailed in the book) in the appendix is a concise introduction that could probably be used in a college course on World Religions.
     
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  9. Excape Goat

    Excape Goat Member+

    Mar 18, 1999
    Club:
    Real Madrid
    [​IMG]


    The book is too spiritual for me. It was about Paulo Coelho finding something spiritual through a trip he embarked in the 1980's with his wife. I would have enjoyed it more if I read it as a younger man in search of something.

    I stopped after reading over 50% of the book.
     
  10. Ismitje

    Ismitje Super Moderator

    Dec 30, 2000
    The Palouse
    Club:
    Real Salt Lake
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    May I ask, to push back against Puritans who implemented such policies/preached such policies, or against the idea that Puritans were fire and brimstone types at all?
     
  11. TheJoeGreene

    TheJoeGreene Member+

    Aug 19, 2012
    The Lubbock Texas
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    Moreso to push back against the idea that the fire & brimstone approach was all they did.
     
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  12. Ismitje

    Ismitje Super Moderator

    Dec 30, 2000
    The Palouse
    Club:
    Real Salt Lake
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I am giving brief remarks next Monday in Ralph Bunche Park in Manhattan, and I know only the basics of his role in the UN, the US, and the world so I wanted to dive deeper. He's under-studied; he's a giant. His role as international mediator won him the Nobel Peace Prize (the first person of African descent to win one); he marched at MLK's side in the famous Civil Rights protests in the 1960s. And neither the internationalists nor the civil rights folks talk much about him.

    Neither have I to this point; I will do better.

    Ralph Bunche, An American Odyssey by Brian Urquhart.

    [​IMG]
     
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