The MLS should let the owners of the teams pay the salaries...

Discussion in 'MLS: General' started by Texas4x4, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. Texas4x4

    Texas4x4 New Member

    Jul 18, 2004
    the other day two of the espn hosts were talking about how the league owns the players and disperces(sp?) them throughout the league, i think having the owners of the teams pay the salaries of the players would raise the payroll of the league and draw more players to it who now dont want to play for such a small amount of money.
     
  2. scaryice

    scaryice Member

    Jan 25, 2001
    The owners do pay the salaries. Why would you raise the payroll for a league that has never been profitable?
     
  3. Tyler66

    Tyler66 New Member

    Apr 22, 2004
    Massachusetts
    That would also turn into baseball's salary mess. We'd have big spenders like Jorge Vegara's CD Chivas USA become the New York Yankees of MLS, while small markets like Columbus and Salt Lake City would suck even worse.
     
  4. aosthed

    aosthed Member

    Jul 16, 2004
    40º30' N 111º52' W
    Club:
    Real Salt Lake
    Nat'l Team:
    Sweden
    Oh... I don't know. Salt Lake City may actually get to enjoy the revenue that comes from averaging 20,000+ per game (the major source of revenue in MLS is attendance/ticket-sales).

    It's truly a shame that Columbus couldn't enjoy the ticket revenues it had for solid attendance for the first 9 years.

    The irony of MLS is that teams like the Metros would go bankrupt in a heartbeat - as they are the big money losers. Until media deals and advertising in large markets become a significant part of MLS the financial winners/power-houses will be the ones that have the highest attendance. The irony of MLS is that a team like Columbus, DCU, LA, RSL can't take advantage of attendance and REWARD the fans by signing players... instead it's the luck of the MLS draw and eventually they manage to alienate fans almost in every location.
     
  5. aosthed

    aosthed Member

    Jul 16, 2004
    40º30' N 111º52' W
    Club:
    Real Salt Lake
    Nat'l Team:
    Sweden
    Another point - What will MLS do to help RSL get some talent so that they don't turn a tremendous franchise start into a disaster by fielding a crappy team?... Unlike Vergara, RSL doesn't have a parent club that can artificially provide players to its team in MLS.

    I mean, how does MLS reward a team for having high attendance?

    Supposedly, Dean Howes (RSL CEO) said the magic break-even number for RSL would be averaging 15,000 - now when then do 20,000, what do they get for it? Under single-entity, no team can be greater than the sum of the parts... or do they have a method for resource allocation based on the performance / sales of the FO? (I really don't know - perhaps someone on here does)
     
  6. needsashower

    needsashower New Member

    May 2, 2004
    down by the river
    What is it with this mentality that an athlete deserves to earn a million dollars a year? I think most of these guys got it made, they get to work a couple hours a week playing soccer and get paid.
     
  7. okcomputer

    okcomputer Member

    Jun 25, 2003
    dc
    This is false. The NY market is severely hampered by MLS low salary cap. 99% of people who like soccer in the NY area don't give MLS the time of day because they think it is a minor league. If they had ownership that was allowed to spend what they want on players their attendance would be easily the best in MLS. Salary caps help smaller markets and hurt bigger ones.
     
  8. aosthed

    aosthed Member

    Jul 16, 2004
    40º30' N 111º52' W
    Club:
    Real Salt Lake
    Nat'l Team:
    Sweden
    While this could be true... would they be able to net enough to cover the lease?

    ... sure, the NY market in some respects is hampered by the salary cap but it's also saved by single-entity.

    EDIT - ... but you're talking about how it could be, not how it is... I'd love to see attendance go nuts for the Metros (any MLS team actually), but why does the NY area struggle so much? Were they comparable in attendance to LA prior to the HDC? (I really don't know)

    Aren't they the big money losers in MLS? I thought the lease was killing them?...
     
  9. DoctorD

    DoctorD Member+

    Sep 29, 2002
    MidAtlantic
    Club:
    Philadelphia Union
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Here we go again.
     
  10. bunge

    bunge BigSoccer Supporter

    Oct 24, 2000
    This is true in Chicago as well.
     
  11. voros

    voros Member

    Jun 7, 2002
    Parts Unknown
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    God forbid. :rolleyes:
     
  12. McGinty

    McGinty Member

    Aug 29, 2001
    Club:
    Sporting Kansas City
    True, but as bunge alluded to, almost every market has this predicament.

    The lack of a salary cap sure doesn't help the Mets, and it surely didn't help the New York Rangers.
     
  13. Jabinho

    Jabinho New Member

    May 29, 2004
    The Metros had their best year for attendence since the first year in 2001..
    The numbers are all here:

    http://www.kenn.com/soccer/mls/team_averages.html
     
  14. Metros Striker10

    Metros Striker10 New Member

    Jul 7, 2001
    Planet Earth
    I agree. It's not like MLS is making billions of dollars like the other big leagues. There, players should be paid millions, since they are bringing in billions. Why should MLS teams worry about spending million of dollars on players who will get most of their playing time on the reserve team?
     
  15. ElJefe

    ElJefe Moderator
    Staff Member

    Feb 16, 1999
    Colorful Colorado
    Club:
    FC Dallas
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Since the owners of the teams own the league as well, the owners of the teams already do pay their players' salaries.

    (And by the way, any discussion of the MLS economic model should begin with the fact that it's there because MLS' owners want it that way. The salary cap, the single entity model, the whole nine yards.)
     
  16. Michael CM1

    Michael CM1 New Member

    Jun 5, 2002
    Atlanta, Georgia: US
    Landon Donovan makes $900k. Eddie Johnson makes $875k. Considering the league is ten years old I *think* they're doing well on salaries. They just increased the league minimum last year with the Adidas 10-year contract. If you'll notice the league right now is concentrating on something way more important: soccer specific stadia. That will allow greater profits and in turn allow the teams to pay more. The single-entity structure will be around for a few more years so you may as well get used to it.

    By the way, go check on the prices of some of the stars in the EPL. I think David Beckham makes more than Pay-Rod. In other words I don't think we'll EVER draw the top talent during their prime. The league was able to keep Landon and maybe could do the same with EJ. Baby steps.
     
  17. okcomputer

    okcomputer Member

    Jun 25, 2003
    dc
    Yes, they lose the most and their lease is the worst in the league. I would argue that the talent defficiency in MLS affects NY more than any other team in the league because the people in the area that like soccer used to flock to watch the cosmos play and fair or not the metro product will always be compared to that. So when people see Tim Regan on the field they just completely dismiss the product. A real stadium would help and they would probably do well with that but its a market that will always be a tough sell with a 2 million dollar salary cap. Whenever I try to get people to go to games I always get the same excuses like "its a bunch of college kids" "MLS stands for minor league soccer" etc. Its quite telling that everytime there is a big international game they draw 50k+ yet struggle to get 10k for an mls game. Its much like the chicago market. The question becomes how you can increase the product where it makes sense financially. Thats the million dollar question.
     
  18. DoctorD

    DoctorD Member+

    Sep 29, 2002
    MidAtlantic
    Club:
    Philadelphia Union
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Here we go again: New Yorkers complaining that the quality is not what they deserve or remember "back in the old country".

    What I'd like to know is whether these NY or Chicago sophisticates would go to an Eredivisie game that does not involve one of the big three. Because that is the best comparison to MLS: a lower division league that is selling its best players to better leagues. IMHO the quality is similar.

    If Gaven ever becomes an internationally known star, half the population of NYC will claim to have gone to his MetroStar games - just like Woodstock.
     
  19. okcomputer

    okcomputer Member

    Jun 25, 2003
    dc
    I'm just telling you the reality of the market. The problem the MLS has is that Americans are used to all the best players playing in their leagues. The concept of selling away good players and being a feeder league is a completely foreign concept. Its a tough sell.
     
  20. PJohnson

    PJohnson Member+

    DC United
    Dec 16, 2004
    South Dakota
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    As usual you have made some good points in your previous posts. But I would disagree that the concept of selling players is foreign to the core market for soccer in this country. Because the core market consists of people that already love and follow the game. They just don't follow MLS.

    The concept of selling players as a revenue stream is only foreign to Americans that are not likely to become soccer fans anyway. So rather than a "tough sell", I would suggest that it is an impossible sell to that crowd.

    MLS needs to focus on the core market. And I think they are doing that by building infrastructure, and by steadily improving the level of play on the pitch. I think we need to be a little patient during this phase.
     
  21. Michael K.

    Michael K. Member

    Mar 3, 1999
    There or Thereabouts
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Don't be silly.
     
  22. Michael K.

    Michael K. Member

    Mar 3, 1999
    There or Thereabouts
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    No, they'll say he sucked here, but as soon as he got overseas the European System did something magical to him - the Midas touch - and he became the star he is now (then.) Because MLS produces not a single good player, yanno.
     
  23. aosthed

    aosthed Member

    Jul 16, 2004
    40º30' N 111º52' W
    Club:
    Real Salt Lake
    Nat'l Team:
    Sweden
    Amen.

    My concern isn't as great in terms of competing with OTHER leagues - it's competing WITHIN the league... how do you reward a team for attendance/financial solvency?

    I mean in RSL's case they'll have a stellar first year in terms of attendance (i.e. revenue) and rather than build on that... I'm worried that the Salary Cap / Player acquisition & transfer rules will doom them to mediocrity - and like other markets, people may become disenfranchized.

    You could still have single-entity (just like corporations with Business units / P&L centers) AND reward those units performing the best financially by allowing them to spend more money (i.e. Capital Expenditures are easiest for business units within a corporation that are the best performers - i.e. corporate tends to treate them preferentially)... otherwise, what is the incentive for putting butts in chairs and sellling the product? ... goodwill and redistrubition of revenue to those who don't? (perhaps some of you know how MLS does it?)
     
  24. aosthed

    aosthed Member

    Jul 16, 2004
    40º30' N 111º52' W
    Club:
    Real Salt Lake
    Nat'l Team:
    Sweden
    I guess this is my question for MLS - or you out there who know what they do?

    Corporations (i.e. Single Entity) often have multiple business units that are tied to the same overall cash/revenue issues YET are incentivized and rewarded for both individual business unit performance (e.g. bonuses) AND overall company performance (e.g. stock options).

    If MLS can align it's corporation to incentivize business units (teams) and employees (FO & players) where you create inherent performance incentives so that the teams who "win" benefit, the FO's that get butts in chairs benefits, and the players who produce benefit (I mean Pat Noonan is a crying shame what he gets paid relative to his performances - injustice).

    Businesses do it all the time, does MLS do this?
     
  25. MightyMouse

    MightyMouse BigSoccer Supporter

    Jun 19, 2003
    Island paradise east of the mainland
    Club:
    FC Barcelona
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I am sure once MLS gets every team with a single owner it will get around to being more selfish as per teams needs. Till then enjoy single entity!
     

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