Question for Koreans

Discussion in 'Korea' started by Txtriathlete, Oct 18, 2004.

  1. Txtriathlete

    Txtriathlete Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Aug 6, 2004
    The American Empire
    I saw this in an article, they called the Koreans the 'Taeguk Warriors' Can someone tell me the history or origin of the name etc.?
    Id appreciate it

    Cheers.
     
  2. cosmicbutthairs

    Sep 9, 2004
    Taeguk is our flag. Also theres a place called Daegu. My dad's from there.
     
  3. Txtriathlete

    Txtriathlete Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Aug 6, 2004
    The American Empire
    Thats it?
    Flag warriors? :confused:
    What is Taeguk?
     
  4. K:thecore

    K:thecore Member+

    May 20, 2002
    Honolulu
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    What was the context of the article you read, Txtriathlete?
     
  5. Txtriathlete

    Txtriathlete Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Aug 6, 2004
    The American Empire
  6. yimmy

    yimmy Moderator

    Aug 23, 2004
    California
    Well, I'm not an expert so I hope I don't say the wrong thing but I always thought that the circle in the center of the Korean flag is called Taeguk and means the origin of all things in the universe. The circle is supposed to represent the eternal duality in nature ( good vs evil, etc. ) much like the Korean equivalent of yin-yang. The flag itself is called taeguk-ki (i have no idea what the ki means)
     
  7. Txtriathlete

    Txtriathlete Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Aug 6, 2004
    The American Empire
    :)
    Thanks
     
  8. Hyok

    Hyok Member+

    Sep 4, 2002
    California
    Ki means flag, LOL. By the way, the yin-yang symbol is Daoist in origin. Some Koreans do not like it on the Korean flag, because it is not of Korean origin, and feel that does not signify anything unique to Korea.
     
  9. yimmy

    yimmy Moderator

    Aug 23, 2004
    California
    haha, thx for the info. My Korean sucks! Good thing my wife is a Korean national, and now I'm gonna raise my son to be my own little interpreter!
     
  10. meron

    meron New Member

    Aug 12, 2004
    ny
    The oldest taeguk, aka yinyang was found in KOrea engraved on a stone.

    SOme people also claim that the taeguk was a battleflag used by a King who was called the "red devil". The king's name was Chiwoo:

    Chi wu: http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Chi-You
    http://www.kimsoft.com/2004/go-chosun.htm <-- I'm totally guessing but I swear this site is a front for NK spy activity.

     
  11. the_13th_redneck

    the_13th_redneck BigSoccer Yellow Card

    Sep 3, 2002
    Well.. Taeguk Warriors in Korean would be Taeguk Junsa-dul.
    Taeguk refers to the part of the flag that are the "sticks" that represent Heaven, Earth, Fire and Water.
    The "pepsi" thing is the Yin Yang (called Um Yang in Korean).
    Taeguk-gi is the full name of the South Korean flag. Taeguk referring to the "stick" patterns and gi meaning "flag."
     
  12. Txtriathlete

    Txtriathlete Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Aug 6, 2004
    The American Empire
    Wow,
    This information is really impressive. Didnt know yall had all those hidden meanings in the flag, certainly didnt know about the significance of the sticks.

    Thank you everyone :)
     
  13. Wargamer

    Wargamer Red Card

    Apr 24, 2004
    Except that most of them are completely made up or even downright false.
    Actually when I decided to write this piece, I confused "13th redneck" guy(whom I don't know very well) with "soju gorae"(who is a certified idiot that I came to know regrettably) and prepared an appropriate flogging for him.

    Well I will save it for next time.... maybe to an iranian.

    Anyway taegeuk is the circular symbol signifying yin and yang. It is Taoist in origin even though it may ultimately have a deeper root in east asian cosmology(I think Mongols have similar symbols as well).

    Broken sticks around are called kwae. There are 2^3=8(you figure it out) kwaes and the original flag sported the full 8 kwae system. Modern Korean flag dropped 4 and is using only the other 4(so it is called 4 kwae).
     
  14. Hyok

    Hyok Member+

    Sep 4, 2002
    California
    Hey, even a broken clock is correct twice a day...:) Wargarmer is absolutely right, except for the insults.
     
  15. Wargamer

    Wargamer Red Card

    Apr 24, 2004
    And I am sure you are still stupid enough to read it incorrectly.
     
  16. the_13th_redneck

    the_13th_redneck BigSoccer Yellow Card

    Sep 3, 2002
    Hmmm I'm pretty sure that the "stick" patterns are the Taeguk.
    If I'm wrong I deserve to be shot through the foot.
    I know the rest of the information is surely right though.
    Can someone confirm for me that I am right or smash me back to where I belong?
     
  17. the_13th_redneck

    the_13th_redneck BigSoccer Yellow Card

    Sep 3, 2002
    Okay I just looked it up.
    Here's a good English site:
    http://flagspot.net/flags/kr.html#symb

    I was wrong about which the "Taeguk" is in that it's the whole set of the Um Yang and the Kwae (the stick thing). So for that my apologies. But the rest of my information is right.
     
  18. Elliad

    Elliad Member

    Jun 22, 2002
    Sydney, Australia
    Yeah, Wargamer's right in this one. And those 'gwae's also have their own names - "Gun( 건 )", "Gon( 곤 )", "Garm( 감 )", "Yi( 이 )", if my memory serves me correctly.

    The actual Um-Yang's actually a bit different to the Chinese Taoist symbol, I think. It might be a variation, but their symbol is in black and white, with a little circle in each of the semi-circles. And of course ours is just red and black without any circles.
     
  19. the_13th_redneck

    the_13th_redneck BigSoccer Yellow Card

    Sep 3, 2002
    Sounds about right.
    The last time I read about it was when I was like 8 years old so my memory is a bit faded.
     
  20. Hyok

    Hyok Member+

    Sep 4, 2002
    California
    I hope you're wearing steel toed shoes. :)
     
  21. the_13th_redneck

    the_13th_redneck BigSoccer Yellow Card

    Sep 3, 2002
    There goes my foot.
     

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