Possession Soccer/Positional Play Thread

Discussion in 'Coach' started by elessar78, Nov 13, 2015.

  1. CoachP365

    CoachP365 Member

    Money Grab FC
    Apr 26, 2012
    I liked doing a 3v1, 4v2 or pentagonal 5v2 (since I ran 3-2-3-2 this fit our "formation") with the progression to "if the outside make 5 passes the 6th one should release someone to goal/if the inside win the ball its 2v1 past the "base" of the pentagon" just playing to 2 puggs. We'd mix it up with 2v1 with the guy who gave up he ball having to make the recovery run, every nth pass could be a release to goal (so 4th,8th,12th)/defenders have to figure out the pattern, defenders win it's 2v3, etc....

    I think there's a disconnect at the u10/12 vs full field with "rondos" and "recycling, resetting". You can probably run your kids ragged on a u10 field especially by having them in rondo mode full time, since teh space is so small. On a full field it seems you really only "rondo" to break into a zone/get to a shooting situation or relieve a numbers down situation. Circulating through the back line - even if they're at midfield - is different, maybe covered in shadow play?
     
    elessar78 repped this.
  2. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    #152 rca2, Nov 23, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2019
    @CoachP365 When I coached U10s, it was an 11v11 format so I had to plan for transfer of the skills and tactics to the larger size. I did that using 11 a side shadow play and by running front 2 lines against back 2 lines in a half field. Typically popup goals set at midfield on each side by the touch line is how the back two lines scored and of course the front 2 lines were playing to a full size goal with keeper.

    After that I always ended with an unrestricted scrimmage. So I used a classic session format, starting with the individual performing the targeted technique or tactic, progressing to SSG, progressing to multiple lines, and ending in a full scrimmage. The team had no problems adapting the learning to matches. All but one of our opponents played kick and run bunch ball, so the kids had no trouble seeing and playing into the open spaces. Finally toward the end of the season we played a team of older girls who were not coached to play bunch ball, but the girls applied the fundamentals appropriately, playing very well.

    It made me a big believer in the classic session format and the focus on fundamentals instead of team tactics.

    The old "teach a man to fish" vs. giving him a fish. I think some coaches then and now spend too much time on team tactics and telling players what to do, instead of teaching the players to solve tactical problems.

    My pet peeve was coaches telling players to "stand here". Some of the coaches who know that soccer is dynamic, say it without thinking of what they are communicating. I think nothing does as much damage during player development as that simple sentence. I vowed before I ever coached my first session that I would never say "stand here" to a player. And I never did.
     
  3. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
  4. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Even better that it came against one of the best defending teams in, maybe, 30 years?
     
  5. CoachP365

    CoachP365 Member

    Money Grab FC
    Apr 26, 2012
    I dunno man, I think the guy with the painbrush hairdo should have unloaded it when he was pressured from 00:02 - 00:04 - looks to be a centerback....
     
  6. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    That is a great clip for coaching. It shows a lot of things done right. It is a tribute to playing simple. I particularly liked how the dribbling was effective either finding more space or else forcing the defense to collapse into the center creating more space out wide.
     
  7. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    #157 elessar78, Aug 21, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2020
    Played a new (to me) possession activity last night.

    6v6 half field (1 big goal, 3 PUGGs at midfield)
    60-second active intervals/3 minute recovery or more.
    Objective: be the team with the ball at the end of 60 seconds. Play 3 rounds.

    High intensity activity where Teams are either possessing to keep it or pressing trying to get the ball back. Short duration forces them to maintain high levels of work.

    Edit:
    Progression(s)—3 passes unlocks the goal. Win the ball back from the other team unlocks the goal. Score a goal and the opponent is immediately knocked out.
     
    Malabranca repped this.
  8. blech

    blech Member+

    Jun 24, 2002
    California
    I like this.

    Still recall seeing the benefits of shifting to high intensity with longer breaks - go hard and then let's break - stay focused, do it right, and avoid developing bad habits
     
  9. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Exactly. It's a new to me concept. We ask our players to "go all out" in games, but at practice but rarely show them or have them experience what that means. It has to be exposed and trained. Can it be sustained for the whole match? Maybe. Passages of play tend to be <2 mins before there is a stoppage.
     
    blech repped this.
  10. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    The last thing we should want players to do is to stand around for a couple of minutes and then sprint for a couple of minutes. It isn't realistic, it isn't good soccer, and it is completely unnecessary. Most of the time in matches is spent in low intensity movement--walking and jogging. The movements are random and the intensities are random too. (That assumes experienced players playing organized soccer.)

    Intervals are fine for endurance training, but that is not technical or tactical training.

    I suspect that you are interested in players playing hard, focused, and trying to win. That has little to do with sprinting. If a player needs to sprint more than a few steps, then that means some player made a mistake.
     
  11. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Whole training session is not set-up like this. This can be squeezed into a 10-minute window and the rest of practice is more traditional. It allows them to push and experience what "all-out" means.

    Secondly, many of the speed/strength and conditioning trainers I follow recommend doing sprints with full recovery (5 mins). It's NOT soccer applicable in general, but in terms of overall athletic development, you want them to know/feel what their top speed feels like. The athlete may not know that over 10-20 yards, so you have to expose them 40-100y(?). It's important to note that this is NOT a conditioning exercise—speed, power output.
     
  12. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    Speed training and technical training is done when fresh. So ususally at the start of combined sessions. If you do sets of sprints, the length of recovery period between sprints determines if the training is endurance training or speed training. Same movements different purposes.
     

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