Mainstream media show true colors with WUSA demise

Discussion in 'Business and Media' started by okcomputer, Sep 18, 2003.

  1. okcomputer

    okcomputer Member

    Jun 25, 2003
    dc
    I'm not one that usually falls into the US media hates soccer crowd, but I must say the piling on by many of these guys the last few days really ticks me off. The Telanders and Lopresti's of the world, who have never once written about the league or gone to a WUSA game, are now all of a sudden writing headline columns about its demise from their expert point of view. Where were these clowns when the league could have used some good publicity? What makes it even worse, is they use the demise of the WUSA as a way to say soccer will never make it here. Instead of saying it is more of a problem with womens sports and poor management. Moreover, the gloating that they are doing shows a true lack of professionalism and character on their part. If anything these women were, what these types of guys are always claiming is missing in sports today, people who play for the love of the game not the paycheck. These clowns are a bunch of hypocrites.
     
  2. roarksown1

    roarksown1 Member

    Mar 30, 2001
    Playa del Rey, CA
    Club:
    Hamburger SV
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    A train wreck is more exciting than a train museum.
     
  3. Roehl Sybing

    Roehl Sybing Guest

    The face of soccer in America continues to be the women's team, and will remain so for a while after the WUSA is gone. Women's soccer equals soccer. Men's soccer is just a happy novelty that occurs once every four years, as if nothing else takes place between World Cups. That's just a reality that people have to contend with for now, a reality that soccer bashing journalists are happy to cling to. There's nothing that can be done about them.
     
  4. diablodelsol

    diablodelsol Member+

    Jan 10, 2001
    North Ridgeville, OH
    This is true for the most part, although this has diminished somewhat. However, your contention that this is not also true for the women is absurd.
     
  5. DoyleG

    DoyleG Moderator
    Staff Member

    FC Edmonton
    Canada
    Jan 11, 2002
    Victoria, BC
    Club:
    FC Edmonton
    Nat'l Team:
    Canada
    The women have been on an extended sucess for years. The men's phenom has only begin to emerge.

    The women crashing at the WWC might change things.
     
  6. pupusa3000

    pupusa3000 Member

    May 15, 2001
    East Bay Area
    I don't even think the women's game has an impact like it once did. Due to the MNT doing it big in Japorea and the MLS, the face of soccer in America is shifting to the men's side where it should be. The potential for the men's team is so great that it can't be denied.
     
  7. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    So, if this is the case... what happens if the mens' team crashes at, or fails to qualify for, Germany '06?
     
  8. sregis

    sregis Member

    Nov 5, 1999
    Hoboken, USA
    ...and i'm guessing few tears will be shed over your way. if only we could keep them barefoot and pregnant!
     
  9. Roehl Sybing

    Roehl Sybing Guest

    "where it should be"? What does that mean?
     
  10. bostonsoccermdl

    bostonsoccermdl Moderator
    Staff Member

    Apr 3, 2002
    Denver, CO
    Well, as far as not making '06, the thoughts of continuing any momentum and growing enthusiasm for the MLS and US soccer in the mainstream: we are up shits creek.

    Or at least set back another possible decade...
     
  11. Bryan Gividen

    Bryan Gividen New Member

    Mar 8, 2003
    Provo, UT (BYU)
    Where it should be. Where the rest of the world has their priorities. I'm going to be completely economical about this whole thing.

    The vast majority of the people in the world don't care about women's sports. I would say, of the total world population, probably 5% care about women's sports and that's a high estimate. The shift of "where focus should be" is very much reflective of the fact that the rest of the world cares about men's teams. Therefore, logically, we would follow the trend and the focus would be on men's teams.

    The quote I love best, "[WUSA] should be run as a business not as a crusade for women's rights." Women's sports as a business model, is not as succesful as men's. The media coverage ought to be given to the more succesful business model.

    But, as someone so eloquently put it, train wrecks are more exciting to see than train museums.
     
  12. bostonsoccermdl

    bostonsoccermdl Moderator
    Staff Member

    Apr 3, 2002
    Denver, CO
    I am guessing he means that the American public's attention is swinging more to where the rest of the world place emphasis.

    Yeah, we are proud of our womens team, but as far as a continuing our development as a soccer nation, we need our country to continue to move up the ranks as far as a a mens national team and a respected MLS club system..

    lets call a spade and spade...
     
  13. CyphaPSU

    CyphaPSU Member+

    Mar 16, 2003
    Not Far
    Club:
    Philadelphia Union
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I agree.

    BTW, Jim Rome is one of the worst "experts" I've ever seen.
     
  14. Real Ray

    Real Ray Member

    May 1, 2000
    Cincinnati, OH
    Club:
    Real Madrid
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    http://www.nytimes.com/2003/09/20/sports/soccer/20araton.html

    Harvey Araton today hints at this today when he writes
    In some ways with Harvey, it closes a circle re: the flap the NYT found themselves in re: Augusta and women members. Yes, I would argue there are merits to the Augusta arguments, but in comparison to a real bread-and-butter issue for women in sport-employment-how silly and petty does their effort look now? How "Entertainment Tonight," does Mr. Raines' "flooding the zone" on that story seem in comparsion to the the folding of a league that provided a wage for some women?

    Don't confuse this with me saying the NYT or any outlet should carry water for pro sports leagues-that's not what I'm saying. My point is that is the if "Times" cares about reporting on womens issues, cares about diversity as they say they do, than perhaps they could learn a lesson from this: learn how better to picks your fights; use sounder editorial judgment instead of going for tabloid-like sex and sizzle.

    If they had instead spent the energy/resources used in defending Martha Burke on the WUSA and giving it better coverage, would it have saved the league? I would think no-but it wouldn't have hurt-and it would IMO have shown a hell of a lot more class and journalistic integrity.
     
  15. okcomputer

    okcomputer Member

    Jun 25, 2003
    dc
    Re: Re: Mainstream media show true colors with WUSA demise

    Totally. Thats what I stressed when I emailed to them.
     
  16. okcomputer

    okcomputer Member

    Jun 25, 2003
    dc
  17. Roehl Sybing

    Roehl Sybing Guest

    Ah, I see.

    Why do we care about the priorities of the rest of the world again?
     
  18. Bonji

    Bonji Moderator

    Feb 4, 2003
    Denver, Colorado
    Club:
    Colorado Rapids
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Cnn has a link to a SI Grant Whal article all about how the US WWC team is being overshadowed by the "demise" of their league. The link is right out front on CNN. I have never seen a MLS story linked on the front of CNN.
     
  19. sregis

    sregis Member

    Nov 5, 1999
    Hoboken, USA
    if mls failed a week before a us-held world cup, you don't think it'd make it on cnn's front page?
     
  20. sregis

    sregis Member

    Nov 5, 1999
    Hoboken, USA
    and this has what to do w/ the development of the men's team? let's call a spade a spade.
     
  21. Pauncho

    Pauncho Member+

    Mar 2, 1999
    Bexley, Ohio
    Club:
    Columbus Crew
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    The response to WUSA going belly up is exactly zero surprise:

    (1)The bellicose part of the mainstream American sports establishment hates both women's sports and soccer. They will pass up no opportunity to bash either, and this is a golden opportunity to bash both.

    (2)The liberal part of the mainstream American media establishment thinks that women deserve equal prizes in tennis and golf, and a league of their own for basketball and soccer. This should not be confused with their wanting to spend $20 of their own money and a Saturday afternoon of their own time watching any of those things.

    If WUSA had as many people willing to spend a rainy Wednesday night sitting outdoors, getting worked up over which bunch of women did a better job of chasing after a ball as they have who will say they think women should have equal opportunities, we wouldn't be having this conversation. Liberal political opinions does not a women's sports fan make. And we are talking about a commercial enterprise, not a human right. I regret the failure of the WUSA, but I am not surprised by it. The only reason there is still a WNBA is because shutting it down would not be worth the embarassment, not because it shows any chance of ever making money. This isn't because women's sports are "bad", but it is because there isn't enough of a fan base to make them a paying proposition.
     
  22. sregis

    sregis Member

    Nov 5, 1999
    Hoboken, USA
    there are many who believe a women's league can be successfully sustained w/ crowds of 5-7 thousand.
     
  23. kpaulson

    kpaulson New Member

    Jun 16, 2000
    Washington DC
    If breakeven points for other (admittedly minor) league franchises are around 5k, one would think it's at least possible, no? Of course, whether you can get 5k to come to a women's league without WUSA's relative media hype (and cost) is an open question.
     
  24. TOTC

    TOTC Member

    Feb 20, 2001
    Laurel, MD, USA
  25. USAsoccer

    USAsoccer Member

    Jul 15, 1999
    Tampa, Florida
    Unless....

    You can see a train wreak while AT the museum....
     

Share This Page