Gianluca Busio at Venezia (R)

Discussion in 'Yanks Abroad' started by Dave Marino-Nachison, Feb 10, 2017.

  1. ChambersWI

    ChambersWI Member+

    Nov 10, 2010
    Club:
    AC Milan
    Let me also be clear and say I think do far the worst teams in Italy this year are Spezia, Genoa, and Salerinatana. Cagliari should be much better than they are but they just cannot figure it out (though they'll probably sneak by in the 2nd half of the season with a coaching change), and Torino has been awful for a couple years but hiring Juric is huge for that club.

    To me the biggest issue for Venezia is integrating all the pieces to first team but I like the ambition they play with.
     
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  2. Eldinter

    Eldinter Member

    Jul 28, 2009
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Club:
    FC Internazionale Milano
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    #527 Eldinter, Oct 4, 2021
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2021
    Both were #10s at that age and played further forward. Pirlo was moved to regista at Milan when he was like 23 by Anvelotti. He lacked pace to play as a #10. Modric at 18 was on loan getting hacked on terrible pitches in the Bosnian league.
     
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  3. Eldinter

    Eldinter Member

    Jul 28, 2009
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Club:
    FC Internazionale Milano
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Nope. The reason Italy hasn't lost a games in 2.5 years is that they have the best midfield trio in the world: Jorginho, Verratti, Barrella. Then they've got 23-year olds Locatelli and Pellegrini as bench options. And then emerging talents Tonali and Rovella coming through.

    In perspective, Pellegrini is Roma's new captain, absolutely on fire now, and has no chance of starting for the Azzurri because of this depth and quality.

    Fans will think it's cool that Busio has Italian heritage and he'd probably make the U21 team as a bench option, that's about it.
     
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  4. ChambersWI

    ChambersWI Member+

    Nov 10, 2010
    Club:
    AC Milan
    You've also got Pessina who while more of a Cam plays in the mid, Tonali, Castrovilli, Cristante, Pogeba, Sensi, and Mandragora
     
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  5. eliwood

    eliwood Member+

    Jul 25, 2016
    They're apparently leading the race for Sergio Romero. that would be huge for their survival
     
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  6. frankburgers

    frankburgers Member+

    May 31, 2016
    Yes it would their gk is a weak spot.
     
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  7. mschofield

    mschofield Member+

    May 16, 2000
    Berlin
    Club:
    Union Berlin
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    I was hoping they'd sign that Lithuanian named Turner
     
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  8. LouisianaViking07/09

    Aug 15, 2009
    Would be a great move for him.
     
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  9. Scotty

    Scotty Member+

    Dec 15, 1999
    Campania
    These quotes come from Venezia coach Paolo Zanetti, in an interview he gave a few days ago:

    "This kid is ready, more than anyone. But we're not talking about something hopeful. He's only 19 but he plays for the U.S. national team and has experience, which is why we paid for him [5 million, ed]. He fit himself in perfectly from a tactical standpoint. He combines quality and quantity, and he has the advantage of understanding Italian since his dad is from Brescia. He has enormous potential. He was being thought of as a regista, but I see him as more of a mezzala. He has some goals in his legs. He'll be an important crack for us, but he'll start showing talent in other areas, too. You'll see."

    https://www.trivenetogoal.it/2021/1...onto-sara-un-crack-importante-per-noi/137678/
     
  10. mschofield

    mschofield Member+

    May 16, 2000
    Berlin
    Club:
    Union Berlin
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    That's great for Busio. as rounding into a Serie A 8 means more employment opportunities. I do think Venezia have looked their best with him as a 6, though
     
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  11. Scotty

    Scotty Member+

    Dec 15, 1999
    Campania
    Translated from Tutto Venezia Sport:


    Busiomania?

    There’s not much to say after the disappointment against Spezia and the near-disappointment against Torino; finally scoring a goal in the 93rd minute has made us feel more than a little elated. And the fact that it was the 19-year-old Gianluca Busio to find the net has perhaps ignited in us fans something we could define as Busiomania.

    The fact is that, regardless of his goal at Cagliari, the Italian-American is impressing everyone (including Zanetti) for the consistency of his performances in relation to the intensity he displays on the field, all of which is combined with personality and a rapid acclimatization.

    Everyone across the Atlantic had described him to Zanetti (and to us) as a "little Pirlo", and perhaps it was also for this reason that he was initially deployed as a regista in front of the defense. Then only later it became understood that, shifted a bit further forward, he could make even more of an impact and that, perhaps, rather than a "little Pirlo", Gianluca is more of a "little Gattuso" (as he himself stated in an interview with DAZN). In the correct proportions, obviously.

    Busio is the third ‘02 to score a goal in the Serie A and the first to notch both a goal and an assist. Everyone has by now noticed how good he is, so I suggest that we all enjoy it. Because the attention he’s receiving is only going to increase. Trust me.

    https://www.tuttoveneziasport.it/ed...enezia-durante-la-amata-sosta-nazionali-11659
     
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  12. Gorky

    Gorky Member+

    Jul 28, 2006
    NYC
    Club:
    New York Red Bulls
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I still think more Pirlo than Gattuso.
     
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  13. felloveranddidanadu

    Plymouth Argyle FC
    Dec 12, 2009
    Club:
    San Jose Frogs
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Pirlo and Gattuso played in similar spots on the field, no? One was a deep lying playmaker and the other was a bulldog slash battering ram. Gattuso was in the mould of Nainggolen (sp?) and Nigel De Jong while Prilo (and Busio) is more along the lines of Xavi Alonso or Hector Herrera. I think he fits as a CAM/CM/CDM in equal measure, though you obviously have to balance the rest of the midfield to his strengths and weaknesses. Venezia is figuring it out and he won't be there long in all likelihood
     
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  14. dark knight

    dark knight Super Moderator
    Staff Member

    Dec 15, 1999
    Club:
    Leicester City FC
    Reminds me a bit of Valderrama - without the strength in possession (and as much creativity) which he needs to develop. The small passes and always keeping the ball moving at a tempo. Hopefully he becomes an assist machine like some of these comparisons.
     
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  15. dougtee

    dougtee Member+

    Feb 7, 2007
    Being exceptional at set pieces sure helps too
     
  16. SUDano

    SUDano Member+

    Jan 18, 2003
    Rochester, NY
    At the end of this says he really doesn't speak Italian anymore, but maybe that's different than understanding it?
     
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  17. comoesa

    comoesa Member+

    Aug 13, 2010
    Christen Press's armpit
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    He has probably started speaking it again once he go back in his brain when he made the move.
     
  18. Swami

    Swami Member

    Mar 5, 2005
    Where did Busio play in the 4-3-3?
     
  19. SUDano

    SUDano Member+

    Jan 18, 2003
    Rochester, NY
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  20. golazo68

    golazo68 Member+

    Dortmund
    United States
    May 21, 2004
    Brazil
    His style of play and abilities is going to limit his options. But Italy seems a great fit- speed and physicality of league seems just right. And he certainly has the potential to play for top clubs (even in other leagues) who can accommodate/compensate for his 'total package' of abilities.

    I knew a guy who played with Valderrama for Tampa. Told me it was simply impossible to take the ball off him. His legs were so thick, you could kick and knee him all you want- you couldn't move him. Like tree trunks. In fact, he would allow players to do this, because then he could spin off them into space.

    That will never be Busio ha ha

    If Busio can learn to control his tendency to give up 1-2 bad balls with cute flicks
    a game- he will be really solid player.

    I like the Jorginho analogy as well.
     
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  21. DirectK

    DirectK Member

    United States
    Jun 27, 2018
    Businho has a nice ring to it.
     
  22. Winoman

    Winoman Drinkin' Wine Spo-De-O-De!

    Jul 26, 2000
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    You heard it first, here, folks! :thumbsup:
     
  23. Eldinter

    Eldinter Member

    Jul 28, 2009
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Club:
    FC Internazionale Milano
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    He die a nice interview on Orange Slices podcast earlier this week. Said he understands Italian but doesn't speak it. His 24 year old brother speaks Italian and is in Europe with him.

    Had a nice story about being in Italy on vacation when Italy won the World Cup. That gave him the inspiration to pursue soccer.
     
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  24. mschofield

    mschofield Member+

    May 16, 2000
    Berlin
    Club:
    Union Berlin
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    With SKC, he played all three spots, but was, IMO, best as a single pivot. He also played a false 9 and on the wing on the front line. I mean, maybe goalkeeper, too?
    The problem he has as a single pivot for Venice is that he is so clearly vital to their game in that role that folks pack the center against him. I was shocked when, in his first start, after a dominating first half by him, the other side put three defenders around him, a little moving triangle to deny him the ball. We've seen versions of that since. He's really good for them in that role, but they really do not have enough players at that level to force another side to be honest when he's central. It's tougher to focus a defense on him when he's wider, though, because that leaves the center of the field open and even against Venice, that's not ideal.
    However, in one of their matches he played more what looked like a double pivot/free role, and i think that's probably what they're moving towards.
    I would like the Valerrama comparison to be true, but is it? El Pibe seemed, to me, to be the sort of player you either build a side around, or sit. He wasn't really a system guy, because he was the system. By convention in his part of the field, he was dead slow, but it really didn't matter, because he was the smartest player on any field he played on, by a pretty good stretch. I would love Busio to reach that sort of regal level. I do see the similarities in the way they move the ball. Even every back pass of his has a point to it, advances someone into a slightly better position, makes the attack that much more possible.
     
  25. Scotty

    Scotty Member+

    Dec 15, 1999
    Campania
    Translated below is this interview that appeared as a 7-page feature yesterday in Sportweek, which is the Saturday supplement of La Gazzetta dello Sport. And attached is an image of the opening two pages:



    Tu vuò fà l’italiano

    A father from Brescia, a mother from New York, and born in North Carolina. Our name and dark skin. A professional since the age of 15 and a starter for Venezia at 19. And a USA international. The story of this midfielder could already be a novella.

    Greensboro, where you grew up, is famous for metalcore music. Are you a fan of it?
    "I’m sorry?"

    Don’t you know it? It’s the musical genre that combines punk with heavy metal. It seems to me that it’s quite popular in you parts.
    "Well, it could be. I’ve never heard of it."

    The chat with 19-year-old Gianluca Busio confirmed our impressions; that this kid is on the right path, and that trusting Wikipedia leaves one open to coming off silly. Fortunately there are are many other areas to cover with this dark-skinned Italian-American from North Carolina who turned pro in Kansas City and arrived at newly-promoted Venezia, immediately winning a starting spot. And one of these areas deals with his hair.

    Have you always worn it that way, in an afro style?
    "I’ve had it this way for three years [laughs]. I’ll let it grow some more and keep it this way for a while."

    How much time does it take to comb it?
    "None, because I don’t touch it [laughing more]. I take a shower and let it dry naturally. It does what it wants."

    So then, an Italian father and an American mother.
    "Yes. My dad was born in Brescia, and when he was 21 he moved to America where he met my mom who’s from New York. They moved to North Carolina and had Matteo, 24, and Ilaria, 21. And I’m the youngest."

    Why did your dad move to the USA?
    "He worked for Lonati, which makes machinery for companies that produce stockings and socks. Now he’s near retirement and mostly takes care of the yard at home."

    You understand our language well, but you only use it to say "yes" and "ciao". Is it possible that your family doesn’t speak Italian at home? Does it work in American families like it does here, where the wife runs the show?
    "It was my dad who had to adapt to my mom’s language [laughs]. That’s why we’ve always spoken English at home. But he managed to give Italian names to the kids. I was going to be named Cristiano, but then my cousin was born two days before me and that’s the name he got."

    All the better for you. And in addition to American women being similar to Italian women as wives, are they also similar as mothers? By that I mean, how many times a day does she call you?
    "A lot. At least twice a day. When she wakes up and before I go to bed. But I’m used to her calling me. I left home for soccer at a very young age."

    On that subject, how did the game come into your life?
    "My dad is an Inter fan and every week in the States he watches Serie A games on TV. And then my brother played soccer and I wanted to copy him, as it often happens with younger brothers. Now Matteo is here to keep me company in Italy."

    Regarding him, are you better or luckier?
    "We’ve played many times against each other, and even in one-on-one situations when they happened to take place. Until two years ago he was better, even if only from a physical standpoint. He’s five years older, and when I was younger it was obviously going to be difficult to take the ball from him or win a shoulder-to-shoulder challenge. But now I can say that yes, I’m better than him."

    You turned pro at 15, the second youngest ever after Freddy Adu. In the USA is it easier to break through in the sport?
    "It’s certainly easier. Also because in America soccer is not the main focus in the sporting world. There are many other sports that get more attention and fans, like baseball, basketball, American football. But I’m not trying to say it’s easy to become a soccer player. It’s something that’s growing rapidly, but even in the next few years it won’t be comparable to the Serie A. So yes, where I’m from it’s easier to become a pro soccer player compared to Italy."

    You immediately became a starter for Venezia. What is the biggest difference compared to what you were used to? And what was the biggest obstacle you had to overcome?
    "The game here is faster, more tactical, and more aggressive. So in this regard you can’t compare it to the American game. Here there’s no margin for error; if you make a mistake you get punished. You get scored on. In MLS that’s not necessarily the case. Also, in Italy the players are more physically well-built."

    Venezia is a multiracial and multicultural team. Paradoxically could this have helped your adjustment?
    "Yes. All my foreign teammates are studying your language, but almost all speak English, including the Italians. Or at least they try to. This helps the team become united more quickly."

    What does coach Paolo Zanetti ask of you?
    "To pay attention tactically in the defensive phase. And that goes the same for all my teammates; each one of us knows how to move and what to do when we defend. Every detail is studied in advance, for both individuals and groups. However, we’re given more freedom when we have the ball at our feet, which is very important for a creative player like myself."

    You began as a forward, covering all the positions up front. Then you got shifted further back. Did that happen because you weren’t scoring enough? And in your new midfield position have you found your right situation?
    "Actually I didn’t begin as a forward [laughing]. I played up front out of necessity, because the attacking players had gotten injured. I’ve always wanted to play in midfield. It’s a part of the pitch that I’ve always felt was meant for me. Of course I like to attack. What matters is having the chance to touch the ball a lot. I love being involved in the play."

    Had you been to Italy before moving to Venice?
    "I had come many times to Brescia to visit my ‘nonno’ and ‘nonna’ [using the proper Italian term for grandparents]. And I had even come to Venice. It’s true that it’s really one of the most unique cities in the world."

    So when you got the call from the club you didn’t have to ask where it was?
    "To be specific, I didn’t know what league they played in, that’s true. But when I saw they played in the Serie A I had no second thoughts."

    Now that you’re here have you discovered you’re more Italian than you initially thought?
    "I’ve always loved Italian food. Pasta most of all. In that sense I’m very Italian [laughs]. As for the rest, I grew up in America. So of course my culture and lifestyle are American."

    So you go to training and games, then what?
    "PlayStation."

    Call of Duty or other shooting games, naturally…
    "Actually no: FIFA."

    Which team? Don’t say Venezia, because no one will believe you.
    "Chelsea. Or Manchester United, but less often."

    Gianluca, do you know Lilian Thuram?
    [thinks for a moment] "Yes, I think so."

    He was a famous player, and today he writes books on racism. In the United States have you ever been a victim of racism for the color of your skin or your Italian origins?
    "No. But I have friends that have dealt with it. It’s a very prominent subject in America. I’m convinced that slowly, little by little, certain prejudices are going to disappear."

    In the Premier League and other leagues players take a knee before the game to show solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. But not everyone does it. In your opinion is it right to continue doing it, or is it just a formality?
    "It’s right to do it. It’s useful because it helps the subject get attention. The more people talking about it the better."

    If one day someone in the stadium or on the street were to insult you for being black, would you react in a certain way or would you remain indifferent?
    "Since it’s never happened to me I can’t tell you if or how I’d react. I don’t know if I’d feel angry or disappointed, or if I’d remain impassive. I think, inside, a sad feeling would come over me. If it happened at the stadium I would certainly point it out to someone who could intervene. And I’ll certainly do everything I can to fight racism, which is something we shouldn’t even have to talk about by now. But this is a difficult subject for me. After all, I’m only a 19-year-old kid who’s just starting to look at life for the first time."
     

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