FC United of Manchester(Part2)

Discussion in 'Other Divisions' started by no prawns ere, May 10, 2007.

  1. no prawns ere

    no prawns ere Member

    Dec 9, 2005
    Manchester
    FC United's impossible dream goes onFormed in rebellion against Old Trafford's millionaire owners, a football club owned and run by its fans tastes FA Cup triumph

    Share145 Comments (22) Julian Coman The Observer, Sunday 7 November 2010 Article history
    FC United players join fans in celebration after the final whistle against Rochdale. Photograph: Dave Thompson/PA

    When it comes to seeking inspiration for football terrace anthems, the 1970s melodies of the Carpenters are not an obvious option. But late into the evening on bonfire night in Rochdale, thousands of beery Mancunian voices were channelling sunny Californian optimism into the damp Lancashire air:

    "I'm on the top of the world," they sang, "looking down on creation, and the only explanation I can find, is the love that I've found ever since you've been around. Your love's put me at the top of the world."

    The song is the latest favourite of the supporters of FC United of Manchester, the rebel club formed five years ago in opposition to the debt-laden takeover of Manchester United by the American Glazer family. And this weekend the lyrics just about sum the situation up.

    I became a founder member of FC United in the summer of 2005, but never expected to witness scenes such as those at Rochdale AFC's stadium on Friday night, when FC United won 3-2. A non-league club conceived by a few angry dreamers in a Manchester curry house reached the second round of the FA Cup, beating a team four leagues above it with a winning goal in the last minute of injury time.

    Bedlam, hysteria, delirium: no word can do justice to the scenes that followed. Jerome Wright, the club's cult forward, was still being chaired half-naked around the pitch half an hour later.

    For many of the 4,000 FC fans who were wiping their eyes or locked in embrace with total strangers, a big away game used to mean Milan or Barcelona, following Manchester United. They still sing the name of Eric Cantona, the French forward and United hero, who has gone on record to support their anti-Glazer stance.

    But somehow, for many of them, Rochdale was bigger than Milan. One fan said before the game that he had not looked forward to a game so much since Manchester United played in the European Cup final in 1999.

    There were tears, flares, flags and endlessly swirling green and gold retro scarves. And at the final whistle there was sheer incredulity at the fact that something no one in the 7,000-plus crowd thought could happen actually had happened. "That was simply unreal," said Adam Brown, a member of the board of directors.

    It was a night that gave sublime, heady vindication to a rebellion without precedent in the history of football. At the time of FC's formation, in the bleak aftermath of the takeover, there was a recurring image that summed up the attitude of a protest movement that wanted to do more than just oppose.

    Back then the archetypal FC rebel would listen politely to all the pundits, Premier League officials and financial experts, nodding dutifully when told that the new Glazer regime, high ticket prices and outlandish salaries for players were just "part of modern football".

    Then he or she would say: "Sod that. We'll do it this way."

    FC are fan-owned. Each of the members has a vote on all important matters. Tickets are kept inexpensive. A commitment to community work is written into the club's constitution.

    Manchester city council has been so impressed with the activities organised by the club in some of the most deprived areas of the city that it is expected to grant FC a lease to build their own ground in Newton Heath – where what was to become Manchester United was founded by railway workers in 1878.

    More than 300 of the club's members volunteer in vital tasks to help keep the costs down. If David Cameron wants a vision of the "big society" in action, he can find it at FC.

    The players play not for the money, but for the adulation of some of the biggest crowds in non-league football. The club's star striker, Michael Norton – scorer of the winning goal on Friday night – earns £80 a week playing for FC, almost £200,000 a week less than Wayne Rooney.

    One much-loved ex-player, Rob Nugent – a big Manchester United fan – has just been voted on to FC's board. In his introductory statement to members, he wrote: "I retired from playing football after qualifying as an accountant, but still want to be involved with a club that I have supported since the first meeting. I have already been assisting the board with the management accounts, and would like to use the skills I have gained professionally in this manner and show that there is another way for football clubs to be run."

    All this passion has found joyous expression in a set of supporters who are perhaps the loudest, most colourful and irreverent in English football. The banners and flags on display at Rochdale – and every week at the club's current home in Bury – are a triumph of attitude and chutzpah. "MUFC – FCUM – I've got love enough for two" reads one, reflecting the fact that almost all FC fans remain attached to their first love, Manchester United.

    "A Right Bunch of Dicks" states another, in happy acknowledgement that not everyone has welcomed the FC revolution. Certainly not the Manchester United manager, Sir Alex Ferguson, who once described the club's fans as "self-publicists".

    The songs are upbeat and defiant, ranging from the Carpenters cover to an FC reworking of the Sex Pistols' lyric "I am an anarchist" ("I am an FC fan"). Another favourite, "He sells asparagus", celebrates manager Karl Marginson's past as a fruit 'n' veg delivery man.

    Friday night's triumph at Rochdale, which was shown live on television, announced FC United of Manchester to the wider world. In that packed, rocking stand, where the level of support would not have disgraced the Nou Camp in Barcelona or the San Siro in Milan, it felt as if we were attending a political rally and a raucous religious service, as much as a football match.

    The money from this scarcely believable cup run – ESPN paid FC £67,000 for the right to screen the Rochdale match – will go towards building the club's own ground. The publicity will build the profile of a club that is already taking on a special charisma of its own.

    An extraordinary thing has happened. Out of the bitterness, division and recriminations that surrounded the debt-fuelled takeover of England's most charismatic football club by a Florida businessman, a new club has been born. Bring on the second round.


    And Woking or Brighton in the 2nd Round, tough one.
     
  2. fc united fan

    fc united fan Member

    Jul 18, 2010
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    Fox Soccer channel Saturday 8pm EST Brighton Vs FC United OF Manchester 2nd round FA Cup on tape delay...

    a tonking awaits
     
  3. Hachiko

    Hachiko The Akita on Big Soccer

    Jun 8, 2005
    Long Beach, CA
    Club:
    Los Angeles Galaxy
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Give it your best shot. Nothing to lose.
     
  4. fc united fan

    fc united fan Member

    Jul 18, 2010
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    Planning approved for Ten Acres Lane


    FC United is pleased to announce that following a meeting today of Manchester City Council’s planning committee, its application to develop a 5,000 capacity ground and community sports complex at Ten Acres Lane, Newton Heath has been given approval.

    General manager Andy Walsh said: "This is fantastic news and testament to the hard work and support we have received from New East Manchester and Manchester City Council, in particular the help and guidance from the planning department.

    "None of this would have been possible without the dedication and committment of our supporters and their desire to see supporter ownership at all clubs."
     
  5. Hachiko

    Hachiko The Akita on Big Soccer

    Jun 8, 2005
    Long Beach, CA
    Club:
    Los Angeles Galaxy
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Good for you guys. You get to shake away from the home of the Shakers and get your own ground to play in. Well done.
     
  6. WarriorDome

    WarriorDome Member

    IFK Göteborg
    United States
    Sep 27, 2008
    Dundee, MI
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    0-1 FC United at the half.
     
  7. fc united fan

    fc united fan Member

    Jul 18, 2010
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    1 1 Aston saves last min penalty for a replay where you can actually buy a ticket

    Category C my Arse!!!

    And we are in the hat for tomorrows draw
     
  8. Wilko66

    Wilko66 New Member

    Jul 25, 2010
    United Kingdom
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    --other--
    Nice one, what a result! Got a few Brighton fans said they have never seen an away support with so much passion.

    In the F.A Cup draw as well, Great stuff.
     
  9. Hachiko

    Hachiko The Akita on Big Soccer

    Jun 8, 2005
    Long Beach, CA
    Club:
    Los Angeles Galaxy
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Did better than my guys did. Well done.
     
  10. fc united fan

    fc united fan Member

    Jul 18, 2010
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
  11. no prawns ere

    no prawns ere Member

    Dec 9, 2005
    Manchester
    Taken from the World Soccer magazine

    By David Conn

    When I went to Gigg Lane, Bury, to write about FC United of Manchester, the rebel football club formed by Manchester United fans disaffected by the Glazer family’s takeover at Old Trafford, I took my 11-year-old daughter with me – and we got more than we bargained for.

    Started in 2005 and serially promoted since, FCUM are now in the Northern Premier League – which is three levels below the Football League - and have launched a community share scheme for supporters (of the club and its cause) to raise £1.5 million towards a stadium of their own in Newton heath, where Manchester United’s extraordinary story began.

    FCUM’s founding fathers, I already knew, have tried to build their club with the positive values they feel United lost: owned by supporters, cheap entry, a community ethos written into the very constitution.

    And if such allegiance to principles can sound worthy, I also knew from going to prior FCUM matches that the fans stand and sing throughout, loud and proud, mixing FCUM celebration songs with protests about the Glazers’ unholy debt.

    What never occurred to me was that might be wandering into the most glorious two matches of FCUM’s young history: a 1-0 victory over Barrow in the FA Cup fourth-qualifying round, and then a magnificent 3-2 win at league 1 Rochdale, which was televised live. That game, with it’s fiercely passionate atmosphere created by the FCUM fans and the delirious celebrations which erupted after the final whistle, thrust the achievements of the self-started club – and its possibilities for a better way to run football – finally into mainstream recognition.

    Secret plotting
    My daughter has never been interested in football and my secret plotting to brainwash her into its live joys have previously been half-hearted. The £60 cost of going to a Premier League match has never offered a great incentive, so she hadn’t been to a match since she was four – when I was told off at Glossop North End, the famous one time First Division club now in the depths of non league, for not stopping her running onto the pitch just before a corner.

    At Gigg Lane, standing in the FCUM singing section, she was captivated. Particularly by the swearing. “What you hear at the game, stays at the game,” my friend instructed her, with a smile. She loved the fans’ signature song, Sloop John B, and then when they sang: “Glazer, wherever you may be\You bought Old Trafford but you can’t buy me,” she asked what it meant.

    And so I tried to explain. These people, many in their 40’s and 50’s, always supported Manchester United, went as boys when it was cheap as chips to get in, then a family from America was allowed to buy the club, they put their debts on to it (I’m not sure she quite grasped the niceties of the leveraged buyout), put ticket prices up, and then these fans decided they’d had enough and formed their own club, to do things the right way. Oh – and Old Trafford is where United play.

    In the second half, she tapped my arm and pointed. “Look, that banner over there says ‘pies not prawns’, she said. I did my best to explain.

    I also warned her that the team you sympathise with – I can’t quite support FCUM, having always been a Manchester City fan –don’t always win, that Barrow are two leagues higher (in the Conference Premier) and therefore will be much stronger. They were, but then in the 76th minute Carlos Roca scored the winner, and my daughter was stunned by her first experience of a home crowd celebrating a goal. Afterwards, I interviewed Roca and he joked that, on Monday, the women at his office job in posh south Manchester wouldn’t care less – and my daughter felt a bit sorry about that.

    It was her insistence that we go to Rochdale, in the first-round proper. There, at a packed, floodlit Spotland, with FCUM 2-0 up, the fans began to sing: “Are you watching, David Gill?” I was in the foothills of explaining that one when Rochdale scored. I had warned her that Rochdale are four leagues above FCUM, they are fully professional, their players don’t have to work like Roca and so in the second FCUM would tire. They did – but then, in the 94th minute Mike Norton scored the winner and everybody went disbelievingly mad.

    I’m now worried that FC United of Manchester might have given my daughter a fantasy idea of what football is like: the fans own the club, they’re friendly, bound by a solid core of common purpose, sing all the way through, and the team always scores a late winner.

    When they sang “Que sera sera” I had to explain that Wembley is the famous stadium in London where the FA Cup final is played. She replied: “Were going there, aren’t we Dad?”


    By David Conn

    When I went to Gigg Lane, Bury, to write about FC United of Manchester, the rebel football club formed by Manchester United fans disaffected by the Glazer family’s takeover at Old Trafford, I took my 11-year-old daughter with me – and we got more than we bargained for.

    Started in 2005 and serially promoted since, FCUM are now in the Northern Premier League – which is three levels below the Football League - and have launched a community share scheme for supporters (of the club and its cause) to raise £1.5 million towards a stadium of their own in Newton heath, where Manchester United’s extraordinary story began.

    FCUM’s founding fathers, I already knew, have tried to build their club with the positive values they feel United lost: owned by supporters, cheap entry, a community ethos written into the very constitution.

    And if such allegiance to principles can sound worthy, I also knew from going to prior FCUM matches that the fans stand and sing throughout, loud and proud, mixing FCUM celebration songs with protests about the Glazers’ unholy debt.

    What never occurred to me was that might be wandering into the most glorious two matches of FCUM’s young history: a 1-0 victory over Barrow in the FA Cup fourth-qualifying round, and then a magnificent 3-2 win at league 1 Rochdale, which was televised live. That game, with it’s fiercely passionate atmosphere created by the FCUM fans and the delirious celebrations which erupted after the final whistle, thrust the achievements of the self-started club – and its possibilities for a better way to run football – finally into mainstream recognition.

    Secret plotting
    My daughter has never been interested in football and my secret plotting to brainwash her into its live joys have previously been half-hearted. The £60 cost of going to a Premier League match has never offered a great incentive, so she hadn’t been to a match since she was four – when I was told off at Glossop North End, the famous one time First Division club now in the depths of non league, for not stopping her running onto the pitch just before a corner.

    At Gigg Lane, standing in the FCUM singing section, she was captivated. Particularly by the swearing. “What you hear at the game, stays at the game,” my friend instructed her, with a smile. She loved the fans’ signature song, Sloop John B, and then when they sang: “Glazer, wherever you may be\You bought Old Trafford but you can’t buy me,” she asked what it meant.

    And so I tried to explain. These people, many in their 40’s and 50’s, always supported Manchester United, went as boys when it was cheap as chips to get in, then a family from America was allowed to buy the club, they put their debts on to it (I’m not sure she quite grasped the niceties of the leveraged buyout), put ticket prices up, and then these fans decided they’d had enough and formed their own club, to do things the right way. Oh – and Old Trafford is where United play.

    In the second half, she tapped my arm and pointed. “Look, that banner over there says ‘pies not prawns’, she said. I did my best to explain.

    I also warned her that the team you sympathise with – I can’t quite support FCUM, having always been a Manchester City fan –don’t always win, that Barrow are two leagues higher (in the Conference Premier) and therefore will be much stronger. They were, but then in the 76th minute Carlos Roca scored the winner, and my daughter was stunned by her first experience of a home crowd celebrating a goal. Afterwards, I interviewed Roca and he joked that, on Monday, the women at his office job in posh south Manchester wouldn’t care less – and my daughter felt a bit sorry about that.

    It was her insistence that we go to Rochdale, in the first-round proper. There, at a packed, floodlit Spotland, with FCUM 2-0 up, the fans began to sing: “Are you watching, David Gill?” I was in the foothills of explaining that one when Rochdale scored. I had warned her that Rochdale are four leagues above FCUM, they are fully professional, their players don’t have to work like Roca and so in the second FCUM would tire. They did – but then, in the 94th minute Mike Norton scored the winner and everybody went disbelievingly mad.

    I’m now worried that FC United of Manchester might have given my daughter a fantasy idea of what football is like: the fans own the club, they’re friendly, bound by a solid core of common purpose, sing all the way through, and the team always scores a late winner.

    When they sang “Que sera sera” I had to explain that Wembley is the famous stadium in London where the FA Cup final is played. She replied: “Were going there, aren’t we Dad?”
     
  12. Nehiyaw redder

    Nehiyaw redder Red Card

    Apr 27, 2011
    Club:
    TSG 1899 Hoffenheim
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    How painful i was to see FC lose in the final playoff against Colwyn bay...Wrights and Nortons suspensions hurt the cause in the worst way. Think it is crazy only Fc Halifax was promoted to the National Conference, should be two promotions with the playoff winner playing off against the last spot above relaegation form the conference North...but congrats ona great year, rasied alot of funding for the stadium project, development fund is close to 400K, here is hoping they have the 2 million required to start building as Gigg Lane is too big, too costly and Bury's home pitch...
     
  13. Hachiko

    Hachiko The Akita on Big Soccer

    Jun 8, 2005
    Long Beach, CA
    Club:
    Los Angeles Galaxy
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Lousy performance against Colwyn. You're not going to move up if you can't beat scrub teams like that.
     
  14. Nehiyaw redder

    Nehiyaw redder Red Card

    Apr 27, 2011
    Club:
    TSG 1899 Hoffenheim
    Nat'l Team:
    Germany
    Yes..play all season to blow it on the most important game...those two top players getting suspended hurt the most and no doubt they need to accept alot of blame for the loss...so another year in the Northern premier..boring...if they do not build the park and bring in more reveneue I am worried they will be stuck in the lower leagues for years..i follow Barnet FC who will most likely drop to the Conference. They have slowly been scrapping by since they made it to League 2 from the conference levels...FC draws crowds of equal numbers..yet over the years barnet has retained the same squad and it seems to get them no where quickly..hope Fc do not have this same fate...with a new stadium, their collective ownership I can see them progressing if they can bring in better players...been a few frustrating years..but they have a great website and I follow them very closely
     
  15. JackBastard

    JackBastard Member

    Jan 21, 2007
    Bridgend
    Club:
    Swansea City AFC
    Nat'l Team:
    Wales
    Three divisions at step 3 go into two divisions at step 2, so promoting three from each step 3 level means we have to relegate nine teams from step 2, not going to happen.

    Scrub team? I have no idea what that means, but that "scrub team" finished second in the league, above FCUM. They're called Colwyn Bay, by the way.
     
  16. Hachiko

    Hachiko The Akita on Big Soccer

    Jun 8, 2005
    Long Beach, CA
    Club:
    Los Angeles Galaxy
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    American thing. It means "an unheralded, not-as-touted side," essentially.
     
  17. Droylsdenfan

    Droylsdenfan New Member

    Jun 8, 2011
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    Ask the majority of non league sides and they hate Fc newton heath of Bury.
     
  18. no prawns ere

    no prawns ere Member

    Dec 9, 2005
    Manchester
    Wrong again!!
     
  19. Droylsdenfan

    Droylsdenfan New Member

    Jun 8, 2011
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    You are kidding yourself mate every time you guys travel somewhere there is always some kind of incident. The last one involved you guys charging the Colwyn bay fans because you were losing.
     
  20. no prawns ere

    no prawns ere Member

    Dec 9, 2005
    Manchester
    Every time....Go on tell me the rest. As for Colwyn 3 or 4 young chavs exchanging handbags not much really is it....your user name explains your bitterness towards FCe like many conf north teams...i'm surprised you dont support the berties :D
     
  21. Droylsdenfan

    Droylsdenfan New Member

    Jun 8, 2011
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    You guys kicked off at Newcastle town, Blackpool,Fleetwood and plenty more places. Every club i visit not one fan says a good word about you lot. The fact the Manchester evening news covers up your hooligan fans is disgracefull.
     
  22. no prawns ere

    no prawns ere Member

    Dec 9, 2005
    Manchester
    Is that the best you can come up with??? in five years i can count on one hand wheres theres been any sort of trouble worth talking about...Newcastle...was Stoke fans turning up and lasted all of 3mins, NO trouble at Blackpool? NO trouble at Fleetwood? Why is it that when fcum play there home games there are only 3 police officers in attendance? i'll tell you why because we have to follow league rules...otherwise they'd be none. you,ve been reading too many stories on the www try getting yourself to a game instead of feeding us with internet stories.:cool: what is the manchester evening news hiding?? the truth.
     

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