Django Reinhardt ---

Discussion in 'Movies, TV and Music' started by servotron, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. servotron

    servotron New Member

    Mar 4, 2004
    St Paul, MN
    WTF.. HOW did I go thirty years without hearing this genius?

    A spectacular guitar virtuoso, jazz master, and just overall perfect music.

    I love it. Anyone who appreciates old style jazz/blues/swing, and/or guitars in general... needs to get some Django.

    The CD I have, which oddly enough MY MOM had in her car when we swapped cars for a day, instantly stuck to me... I stole it from her! It's that good!

    It's called Django Reinhardt - Un Livre Et Un CD

    WOW...just wow.
     
  2. taosjohn

    taosjohn Member+

    Dec 23, 2004
    taos,nm
    Its a sort of a crossroads story-- he was by contemporary accounts a very ordinary player, just getting by in the European equivalent of medicine shows until he suffered severe injuries in the explosion of a kerosene lamp. Several fingers were crippled or destroyed, and he was so compulsive in his recovery-and-compensation process that he became a phenomenal player in a short period thereafter... When his path crossed that of the young Stephane Grappelli, each found a foil in the other's virtuousity, and a whole bunch of stunning music ensued. The Club Hot Quintet was the world's greatest band for a while there...
     
  3. Quango

    Quango BigSoccer Supporter

    Jul 25, 2003
    Colorado
    Club:
    Colorado Rapids
    Check out "Sweet and Lowdown", a Woody Allen film with Sean Penn. It's about a guitar player desperately trying to be better than Django Reinhardt. Has a great guitar soundtrack as well.
     
  4. Haole

    Haole Member

    Feb 14, 2005
    costa mesa, ca
    Club:
    Los Angeles Galaxy
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Django the great gypsy guitarist captured the respect of many American players after hearing him in Paris. The man could flat out play and swing.

    Check all the cd's out, there's a lot and some are sheit and some are poorly reproduced. Of interest to me back in the day were some electric guitar numbers he did in a USA studio session. The dude could bite into some blues like nobodies biz.

    The 'Hot Club' group is the soundtrack for Paris 1930's for me.
     
  5. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I once saw an interview with Willie Nelson where he is talking about how much he loves music and all the great music he's heard in his lifetime. So the interviewer asks him "What's the best music you've ever heard?" or something similar, and Willie answers "Django Reinhardt."

    You have to get the Hot Club stuff with Stephane Grapelli from pre-WWII.
     
  6. servotron

    servotron New Member

    Mar 4, 2004
    St Paul, MN
    I think that's what this CD that I have is. There's a lot of fiddle, and it's quite old sounding, but still surprisingly clear and clean. A true joy to listen to.
     
  7. taosjohn

    taosjohn Member+

    Dec 23, 2004
    taos,nm
    Yeah the electric recordings are special too-- he really focused on electric when he finally picked it up after the war... for some reason the critical book on his electric stuff is that it is too boppy, but I don't hear it that way...
     
  8. chapulincolorado

    Jul 14, 1999
    McAllen, Texas
    Club:
    FC Dallas
    Nat'l Team:
    Mexico
    Wow...indeed....I am not much of a jazz aficionado, but I know some of the basics. I too am surprised how this guitar virtuoso had escaped my radar. Your post has become a good topic of discussion with my 84 year godfather.
     
  9. Haole

    Haole Member

    Feb 14, 2005
    costa mesa, ca
    Club:
    Los Angeles Galaxy
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    If you're a player and, dig Django take a look at a close-up of his left hand.

    A couple of his fingers are basically fused together as a result of the fire he was in. Listen to the lines he puttin' down and imagine doing that with only partial use of your left hand fingers.

    His brother (also a guitarist) is in/out of many of the 'Hot Club' dates. You can see the two of them together in some of the more famous club photos.

    Guitarists still play the type of guitar he used and,there are more than a few French (and other) jazz players who play the same accoustic swing that Django laid down.

    His lines are often copied, note-for-note and the style itself is referenced frequently as well. For my taste, after you've heard Django and Stephane it's quite apparent that they each had the gift and it's nuances are imitated but never replicated.

    Stephane Grappelli was burnin' it up until well into his 80's. His story and music are well worth checkin' out. He was a great soul too.
     

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