Corona Virus

Discussion in 'Youth & HS Soccer' started by Cantona's Eyebrow, Mar 17, 2020.

  1. Cantona's Eyebrow

    Dirty Leeds
    Togo
    Oct 8, 2018
    In the UK, all youth football from pro-youth to grassroots has been cancelled (or at least the recommendation from the sport's governing bodies is that it ceases.) Is that the same in the US for youth fixtures and training?

    Stay safe people!
     
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  2. ppierce34

    ppierce34 Member

    Aug 29, 2016
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Yes sir. We've got nothing, nada, zippo going on. All those parents consumed by Fear of Being Left Out (FBLO) can relax and breath a sigh of relief.
     
  3. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    Really dumb to cancel youth sports. Super low risk endeavor.
    I've been playing soccer through this whole thing with a big group, many appear to be in their 50s and 60s and no one has gotten sick.
    Probably being outside does more good than harm.
    The virus doesn't do well in sunlight, and is easily dispersed in outdoor wide open air.
    The vigorous running is good for health, good for oxygen saturation, good for lung efficiency, good for calorie burning (keeping weight off), good for keeping blood-sugar in check, good for Vitamin D synthesizing, and the fun and social aspect is good for immune system.

    Seeing that the biggest comorbidity risk factors are obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and Vit D deficiency... I'll bet if every person went outside and played soccer we'd have way fewer deaths!
     
  4. BigBear

    BigBear New Member

    NY/NJ MetroStars
    United States
    Apr 20, 2020
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Mate, really silly post. This is a soccer forum; you don't need to sell the general health benefits of the game to anyone. But with regards to COVID-19, this is a very serious health crisis. We need to just listen to the advice of the medical professionals here...
     
  5. smontrose

    smontrose Member

    Real Madrid
    Italy
    Aug 30, 2017
    Illinois, NW Suburb
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I'll put my medical experts up against your medical experts! ;)
     
  6. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    I think you replying to BigBear but it's a good point, there is no consensus amongst medical experts. I have heard many MD's and PhD's criticize the draconian measures we took.
     
  7. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I think when all is said and done, it will boil down to the lack of adequate testing. Once we entered this with inadequate testing, everything was a crapshoot based on best-guesses.
     
  8. CornfieldSoccer

    Aug 22, 2013
    My son's Illinois high school team started working out a little today, informally, led by the seniors, in a park. And man it perked him up for a big chunk of the day. No word yet on when or if they'll be able to do anything officially. But it's something.
     
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  9. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Glad to hear it!
     
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  10. VolklP19

    VolklP19 Member

    Jun 23, 2010
    Illinois
    Hearing that because of the spike in cases in AZ that the state may pull back and youth soccer may be taken off the table. There are currently 26 states where cases have spiked. Could this be a pattern.
     
  11. smontrose

    smontrose Member

    Real Madrid
    Italy
    Aug 30, 2017
    Illinois, NW Suburb
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    The only thing spiking is bullsh1t.
     
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  12. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    We need to open up. Period. Life comes with risks.
     
  13. BigBear

    BigBear New Member

    NY/NJ MetroStars
    United States
    Apr 20, 2020
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    So sorry that people literally dying are inconveniencing your quest to get back to normal. Shocking how little regard you have for your neighbors and community members...
     
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  14. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    Shocking how you have no regard for the children suffering because they are not in school and not playing sports. Already there has been an increase in teenage suicide and child abuse. Sad that you also don't care about the impact to people's livelihoods. I am seeing so many tents (ie homeless communities) sprouting out of nowhere. It's scary. Shutdown comes with health consequences. Don't be so narrow. See the whole picture.
     
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  15. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    The children are the future. literally. The elderly, god bless them, but they are not the future. We need to invest in the future. We are harming children, mentally and physically, due to the shutdown. Also harming them financially by adding trillions in debt that they will have to deal with. Bleak future. Shameful. The virus doesn't harm children. It harms the elderly, who can be protected/isolated. Avg age of death is 80, and most deaths are from nursing homes. Learn the facts.
     
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  16. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    #16 bigredfutbol, Jun 16, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2020
    I agree with some of your logic here--while we don't know as much about the virus definitively as we would like, it does seem that's it's pretty low-risk in a normal outdoor setting. Playing sports and other outdoor activities that don't crowd people together in close quarters with little movement are likely very safe.

    At the risk of coming across as a sanctimonious scold: I'm leery of your rhetoric about the elderly. The elderly in our society are already more isolated than they should be--that's a separate issue--but while I actually agree that going forward, we'll need to be smarter and less one-size-fits-all about preventative measures, I would caution you to avoid that kind of rhetoric. I've heard it said that "Most people who have died from COVID-19 were going to die soon anyway" and let me tell you, NOBODY should want anybody to die this way.

    My wife and I both used to work in a nursing home (it's where we met) and she has been a nurse focused on gerontology for most of her career. And my sister is currently a nurse at a nursing home that was hit hard by coronovirus (double-digit deaths).

    It's a gruesome, terrifying death. Just because a lot of the victims were near the end of their life and were likely going to die soon of some other 'natural cause' doesn't mean we should be cavalier about this. In my five years working as a CNA in two different nursing homes, I attended to many people who were dying, or had just died. I've carefully repositioned and cleaned patients who were mere hours(maybe even minutes) from death, and I've cleaned up recently deceased patients in preparation for the mortician to take away their bodies. I was in the room with at least two patients at their moment of death--I was the lone witness to their final breath. In every case, they went quietly & naturally, after a period where their body shut down. Dying from COVID-19 ain't nothing like that. From what I've read and heard, it's a ********ing nightmare.

    I DO agree with you that we've underestimated how hard this has been on children; I'm very sympathetic to young people who on the one hand are constantly badgered about how much time they spend on electronic devices & video games, yet also society and their elders are forever crimping their opportunities for unstructured play and outdoor time.

    PS In many places, nursing homes were assigned a lot of the cases--the home my sister works in was directed by the State government to open up a COVID-19 unit to accept and treat patients; I mean, where ELSE you gonna send them? Nursing homes are set up to accept longer-term patients in large numbers, more so than hospitals.

    So, the statistic that most deaths were in nursing homes was to some degree a self-fulfilling prophecy. Not completely, mind you--the nursing home in my home town got hit hard even though they weren't taking outside patients.
     
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  17. CornfieldSoccer

    Aug 22, 2013
    Well said, your whole post.

    My wife's a nurse and has had a small number of patients with COVID. One, in their 40s, was hospitalized late last week. Here's hoping that person recovers, but at the moment they are essentially in there on their own and scared to death. The family can't visit, ... I've known three people who've had it -- two healthy people in their 40s, one in their 60s -- and the two younger, healthy people suffered badly for many weeks. Be careful not to be dismissive of those who have gotten this or will get it as somehow expendable.

    And after reading a lot -- and trying to read source material where I can (and where I can understand what's being written -- I'm no scientist) from the increasing number of studies being conducted -- I've hit the point where I'm comfortable with outdoor activity provided it isn't in a tightly packed group of people. And even then, if people will wear masks, there's growing evidence that that greatly cuts down the spread of the disease in those circumstances.

    So my son just rode off on his bike for player-run practice. And I'm thankful for that because, as you and others have said, this is just plain hard on kids. My wife is less comfortable with it and is just keeping her fingers crossed that it's OK.
     
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  18. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Well said.

    I think a lot of the patients who recover and survive will be traumatized. And there's evidence that there are long-term physical health problems associated with having the virus. Many young people who recover from the disease appear to have suffered permanent lung damage--that's something that's been underreported.

    It's weird--I agree with the shutdown critics who argued we made a mistake closing parks and playgrounds. Yet at the same time, I think far too many of those same critics have convinced themselves that the disease itself isn't all that bad.
     
  19. TheKraken

    TheKraken Member

    United States
    Jun 21, 2017
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    It's not that the disease can't be bad, it's that you cannot close up the country and expect anything less than Great Depression 2 will be coming next. That will kill far more people than COVID-19. Quarantine the sick and at risk populaton just like they have done throughout human history. Let the rest live their lives as best they can going to work and school.
     
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  20. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I'm not sure why that's your takeaway from what I said. At any rate, this is veering away from the focus on youth soccer so I'll drop it.
     
  21. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    I agree that nobody should want anybody to die of Covid.
    I guess I am of a fatalistic mindset about this virus. A few months ago I resigned myself to the fact that the virus was here to stay and would become integrated into all of society over time. So there was no point in worrying too much about it. I assumed, and still assume, that every person will likely be exposed at some point in their life. It is a hardship put on us from mother nature, just as there have been many viruses since the beginning of time. There is no guarantee of a vaccine. It may just have to be something we go through, just as we went through chicken pox and other viruses before there were vaccines. (And many still do not get the flu vaccine.)
    I just accept it and feel we can only capitulate to the reality that people will continue to die from it, albeit likely much less than 1% of the population will die from it, and with each day we learn more about it and find better ways to treat it, so I am optimistic that overall suffering will decrease over time.
    I also feel we can mitigate the risk of exposure and, if exposed, how bad the symptoms become, by using masks and trying to optimize our immune systems. I do have sympathy for nursing homes because the elderly there are reliant on others to help mitigate the spread and there's been some failure there as we've seen.
     
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  22. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    As Covid cases pickup in places like CA, FL, TX, it looks like we are moving back to more restrictions and the soccer season will continue to be a big question mark.
     
  23. TheKraken

    TheKraken Member

    United States
    Jun 21, 2017
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    #23 TheKraken, Jun 26, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2020
    Yeah, it's going to be tough for a lot of places I think. Where we live has a very low infection rate, but other parts of the state not so much. With travel soccer we go to these other cities. I'm not worried about my son catching COVID from playing soccer, but I'm also not too enthusiastic about traveling to places if they're still semi-locked down. If the travel league isn't viable, I would hope the club would entertain the idea of playing in the more local league. We could play up an age bracket to make it a little more competitive.

    On a more positive note, one of our preseason camps opens next week and is a full go. Will be good to see them back on the field doing real training. They've had some practices this past month, but they had do be of the socially distant variety. They will be able to actually scrimmage after July 1st.
     
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  24. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    I still don't understand why the world is freaking out over coronavirus when we don't freak out over all the other causes of death.

    So far this year 29 million people have died globally.
    About 500k from covid 19.
    About 28,500,000 from other causes. That's an aweful lot of death that no one seems to care about.

    It seems, at a high level, what has happened is society has simply become accustomed to a non-pandemic life. Throughout most of human history, pre vaccines, humans simply dealt with all the various viruses and bacteria that came our way. And it was bad at times. But we accepted that life wasn't fair, it was tough. But with stuff like chicken pox... it wasn't that bad... but we just accepted that we had to go through it. Then vaccines came along and made life grand. (even though many - about half - still don't take the flu vaccine).

    The past few decades we became so used to a pandemic free life that all of a sudden one hits, that is no worse than many we have had before, but since we simply have become soft to these, we are freaking out as if it's the end of the world if the virus spreads.

    I believe the virus has reached the point of no return and is essentially now endemic to society. Many have gotten the virus that will never be counted since many are asymptomatic. Yet people keep yelping "we have to stop the virus"... uh no... there is no stopping it... there is slowing it down yes. I say wear the mask and live healthily. But outside of that, worrying about it is like worrying over spilled milk.

    Even with the recent increase in numbers, there doesn't seem to be an increase in deaths; though deaths lag so we won't know for a couple weeks. But, Governors are saying that the recent spikes are largely in younger people so it would make sense that the death rate would not spike along with cases this time.

    I played pickup soccer every week this year. One day a week during the heart of the pandemic in march-may. And the past month I have played every single day.
    I still have not heard of a single person getting sick from playing soccer. It just doesn't happen. It's more likely to happen indoors, perhaps in the car ride there or in a locker room, but not outside on the pitch.
    Most likely playing soccer is having the opposite effect, making people less likely to get sick since it increases oxygen saturation and helps synthesize vitamin D. And the amount you are exposed to outdoors is nominal (the viral dose matters).
     
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  25. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    "the presence of SARS-CoV-2 genome in March 2019, before any notification of COVID-19 cases in the world."

    As I suspected, the virus may have been with us far before the media hyped it.
    https://www.ub.edu/web/ub/en/menu_eines/noticies/2020/06/042.html

    While I don't think the virus is at all a hoax (it is very real), I do feel that the high fear around it was to some degree manufactured. The virus was probably around, but once you name it and the media sensationalizes it (amplified by social media), then you get the extreme reaction.
     
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