Carding coaches

Discussion in 'Referee' started by soccerchick584, Oct 7, 2003.

  1. ProfZodiac

    ProfZodiac Moderator
    Staff Member

    Jan 17, 2003
    Boston, MA
    Club:
    New England Revolution
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I haven't done so since then. In fact, I don't think I've carded a coach in two years. I just ignore them, or talk back. I don't need the card anymore to do the talking for me.

    How in the hell did you know I was at that specific recert?
     
  2. rcleopard

    rcleopard New Member

    Aug 26, 2003
    Shoot, he prolly taught it. :)

    Jarrod
     
  3. whipple

    whipple New Member

    May 15, 2001
    Massachusetts
    Along with experience comes omniscience ;)

    Actually, I was there, though not as an instructor, but as one of the administrators. I help out at about half the recerts every year.

    One thing you need to realize is that when you become a referee, it not just passing a test, paying your dues, getting a book and badge and being sent out alone to fend for yourself on a soccer field. Soccer referees are a very special community. We provide help and support to our fellow officals, track their progress, provide in-service training, clinics, assessments, tournament invitiations, etc.

    I am glad to hear you have followed the intstruction you received.

    Sherman
     
  4. nsa

    nsa Member+

    New England Revolution; Boston Breakers
    United States
    Feb 22, 1999
    Notboston, MA
    Club:
    New England Revolution
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Vee have our vays. ;)
     
  5. njref

    njref Member

    Mar 29, 2003
    New Jersey
    Coach Warnings

    Coaches do not get cards, which are a clear indication of a sanction. When I "warn" a coach, I make a clear distinction between an informal warning (which is the same as speaking to a player without a card) and a formal warning that is the equivalent of a yellow card.

    "Coach, I am giving you a formal warning, which is the equivalent of a yellow card..."

    I think this is important for 2 reasons. First, it puts the coach on notice that they have received a formal sanction. If you give a (yellow card equivalent) "warning" without this notice, the coach may not realize the severity of your warning.

    Second, unfortunately many leagues still have by-laws that refer to sanctions for yellow and red cards for coaches. By couching your warning as the equivalent of a yellow card in your words and report, you will not be giving the coach wiggle room to avoid whatever sanction the league gives out.

    Any comments/better ideas?

    NJRef
     
  6. whipple

    whipple New Member

    May 15, 2001
    Massachusetts
    While I agree that warning or assisting a coach to behave responsibly is common sense and a good practice, it is important to note that, under the Laws, it is not necessary, nor are we required to do so. This is at the referee's discretion. They could be gone at the first occurrance or the tenth.

    This is very different from NCAA Rules where, for example for a touchline violation, referees are instructed to warn on the first, caution on the second and eject on the third. NF Rules specify a caution for UB on the same offense, therefore two occurrances and you are out.

    Sherman
     
  7. uniteo

    uniteo Member+

    Sep 2, 2000
    Rockville, MD
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    But in most youth leagues, players are only allowed to play if a coach or team official is present. If you eject the only team official, you leave yourself no choice.
     
  8. rcleopard

    rcleopard New Member

    Aug 26, 2003
    Then you abandon the match, and send the report in. Let the league decide what to do.

    Jarrod
     

Share This Page