BigSoccer Democratic poll

Discussion in 'Politics & Current Events' started by Chizzy, Oct 24, 2003.

  1. Chizzy

    Chizzy Member

    United States
    Aug 7, 2003
    Upper Left, USA
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Retired general and former NATO supreme commander Wesley Clark has led the Democratic field ever since he formally announced his candidacy in September. Governor Dean's support increased in early summer and his support still in a high note since June.
     
  2. DoctorJones24

    DoctorJones24 Member

    Aug 26, 1999
    OH
    Kucinich is the best man and would be the best president. No chance though.

    I honestly don't care much either way, as no matter what it'll be a HUGE upgrade from W.
     
  3. obie

    obie New Member

    Nov 18, 1998
    NY, NY
    Club:
    New York Red Bulls
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    From where are you getting this? In NH Dean is destroying everybody. It's Gephardt & Dean neck-and-neck in Iowa, where Clark isn't even running because he can't get the organization together.

    Nationally, where there are still huge "I dunno" numbers, Dean leads Clark in about half, Clark leads in the other half, but it's still so fluid with these nat'l polls that you can't put any real value in them other than determining who should drop out.
     
  4. Chizzy

    Chizzy Member

    United States
    Aug 7, 2003
    Upper Left, USA
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Re: Re: BigSoccer Democratic poll

    Support among Democrats that are registered to vote
     
  5. Ian McCracken

    Ian McCracken Member

    May 28, 1999
    USA
    Club:
    SS Lazio Roma
    Nat'l Team:
    Italy
    That's a joke, right?
     
  6. DoctorJones24

    DoctorJones24 Member

    Aug 26, 1999
    OH
    You're right. He does have a very slight chance, I guess. I misspoke.
     
  7. superdave

    superdave Member+

    Jul 14, 1999
    VB, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Could you clarify the poll? Is this asking for predictions or preferences? The word "should" goes either way.
     
  8. Chizzy

    Chizzy Member

    United States
    Aug 7, 2003
    Upper Left, USA
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    It's about the Democratic presidential nomination poll, and its two leading candidates. (i.e Clark, Dean)
     
  9. Ian McCracken

    Ian McCracken Member

    May 28, 1999
    USA
    Club:
    SS Lazio Roma
    Nat'l Team:
    Italy
    Should means who do YOU think SHOULD be the nominee. Will means who do YOU think WILL be the nominee. This is not a prediction, it's a preference.

    For example, I think Al Sharpton SHOULD be the nominee because it's high time the Democrats rewarded their most loyal constituency, African-Americans, with a spot on the highest ticket. Of course, I'm not holding my breath, as the Dems won't let black people off the plantation any time soon so long as blacks continue to be solid votes in the bank for them.
     
  10. aloisius

    aloisius Member

    Jul 5, 2003
    Croatia
    I saw one debate and the Reverend was great. He and Kucinich are my kind of folk. But out of the more realistic candidates I say Go Dean
     
  11. riverplate

    riverplate Member+

    Jan 1, 2003
    Corona, Queens
    Club:
    CA River Plate
    Dean is clearly the man to beat. Unless he screws up big time on the stump or some skeleton in his closet is revealed, he looks like he's got it. I think he's building up a huge head of steam and is going to roll over the bunch pretty quickly in the primaries.

    A Marist poll for New York last month had Lieberman at 23% and Dean at 13%. This month, here's how it reads:

    18% Dean
    14% Lieberman, Clark
    10% Gephardt
    8% Kerry
    5% Sharpton
    2% Moseley Braun, Kucinich, Edwards
    23% Undecided
    (Registered Democrats. Plus/minus 5 points.)

    I voted for Lieberman in this thread's poll, even though I'm not a Democrat. He's the only one that makes any sense, from my point of view.
     
  12. superdave

    superdave Member+

    Jul 14, 1999
    VB, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Let's try this one more time.

    Are you asking for predictions, or preferences? Like this...if the US played Brazil in soccer, I would PREFER that the US win, but I would PREDICT that Brazil would win.
     
  13. Chizzy

    Chizzy Member

    United States
    Aug 7, 2003
    Upper Left, USA
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Ok, I'll bite.



    It's early in the campaign season: I wouldn't predict a winner right now, the nomination process still up for grabs for atleast 5 leading candidates which could be either Clark or Dean, and or other candidates, I don't know. I would like Clark to win the nomination just for the heck of it.;) I have to think that Clark is the only candidate who can beat G.W. Bush on issues, leadership and charisma. I've always liked Howard Dean's position on a lot of issues, but i'm afraid his tough anti-war position is not going to meet the Democratic party's main objective in '04, as the party trying to make the bad economy a main issue on the campaign..... not the war.

    Yes, I would say it is more like a preference, and I wouldn't predict a winner, yet.;)
     
  14. BillQ

    BillQ New Member

    Oct 11, 1999
    Chicago, IL
    I think, though, that its clear that the candidates that have been using the grass-roots of the Internet (Dean and Clark) are right now the strongest candidates. I have thought for a while that Dean is the best of the bunch (although I would put Kerry as 2nd choice). In any case, the Dems need to close out this battle quick so they can save cash to fight Bush up until the General Election begins.
     
  15. verybdog

    verybdog New Member

    Jun 29, 2001
    Houyhnhnms
    And that's the reason why DNC are losing support early on. The truth is, everybody can make the economy the main issue, but only Dean has the credential for sticking to anti-war. He can do it either way, while Kerry and Clark can't. I think Dean is going to make the nomination.
     
  16. Mel Brennan

    Mel Brennan PLANITARCHIS' BANE

    Paris Saint Germain
    United States
    Apr 8, 2002
    Baltimore
    Club:
    Paris Saint Germain FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Who should win the Democratic nomination?

    Whoever understands that its not by becoming Republican lite that the Democrats are ever going to take power (except when the Republicans absolutely fail, and the people select the Dems as a false choice that is just "Not republican," but that's not taking power, that's the Repubs giving it away), but rather by making concessions to the substantial so-called left that is currently repped by the Greens and others; only by garnering that vote will the Dems win. Anything else, regardless of candidate, will likely doom them to failure. Of course, it makes it difficult to get al lthat corporate money by making those concessions, so don't expect anyone on your list to follow my advice anytime soon; you folks enjoy another four years of environmental isolationism, military expansion, media fear-mongering, and tanking economies...
     
  17. NGV

    NGV Member+

    Sep 14, 1999
    This "substantial left" that won't vote for the Dems because they aren't leftist enough is a myth, unless your definition of "substantial" is really generous. Nader got, what, under 3% of the vote? A baloney sandwich could probably have pulled 3% of the vote with the amount of free publicity that Nader got. How much did Camejo draw in the California recall? What do Kucinich's numbers in the Democratic primaries look like?

    Here's a link to some exit polls from the 2000 election.

    http://edition.cnn.com/ELECTION/2000/epolls/US/P000.html

    Look at the question on "vote by ideology." Note that 20% of the public describes themselves as "liberal" - and of those self identified liberals, only 6% voted for Nader. Then, look at the question about "Gore's position on issues." Note that only 9% of the public said that Gore was "too conservative," and of that 9%, only one in ten voted for Nader. This leaves us with less than one percent of the total voting public that opted for Nader because they thought that Gore was "too conservative." Note that only 10% of the public said that they wanted the next president to have policies more liberal than Clinton's - and of that 10% who wanted the next president to be more liberal, once again, less than one in ten voted for Nader.

    This supposed rebellious left wing of the Democratic party that punished them for not being liberal enough by voting for Nader looks to be nearly nonexistent, statistically speaking. The only reason they were able to give the election to Bush in 2000 was the freakish closeness of the Florida result, along with our defective electoral system.
     

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