9/11

Discussion in 'Columbus Crew SC' started by Bill Archer, Sep 11, 2003.

  1. Bill Archer

    Bill Archer BigSoccer Supporter

    Mar 19, 2002
    Washington, NC
    Club:
    Columbus Crew
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Forgetfulness occurs when those who have been long inured to civilized order can no longer remember a time in which they had to wonder whether their crops would grow to maturity without being stolen or their children sold into slavery by a victorious foe. . . . They forget that in time of danger, in the face of the Enemy, they must trust and confide in each other, or perish.

    They forget, in short, that there has ever been a category of human experience called the Enemy. And that, before 9/11, was what had happened to us. The very concept of the Enemy had been banished from our moral and political vocabulary. An enemy was just a friend we hadn't done enough for -- yet. Or perhaps there had been a misunderstanding, or an oversight on our part -- something that we could correct.

    And this means that that our first task is that we must try to grasp what the concept of the Enemy really means.

    The Enemy is someone who is willing to die in order to kill you. And while it is true that the Enemy always hates us for a reason -- it is his reason, and not ours.
     
  2. elderado

    elderado New Member

    Mar 5, 2001
    New York City
    Couldn't agree more......

    And as a New Yorker who lives and has lived for 7 years, 3 blocks from the site there is nothing more frustrating and sad when I run into people and they don't remember. They have gone back to living their lives as if it the same world still exist.
     
  3. hangthadj

    hangthadj BigSoccer Yellow Card

    A.S. Roma
    Mar 27, 2001
    Beacon, NY
    Club:
    Columbus Crew
    Thanks, Bill.

    It's tough to be at work today, its tough to concentrate at all really. This is from the Philly Inquirer Op-ed page.

    America, too, must remember 9/11 not only as a terrible day, but a day that produced communal heroism and patriotism that should inspire generations to come.

    In the last two years, those selfless feelings have faded, been imperfectly maintained. We may have promised to volunteer more after 9/11, and only some of us did. We may have promised to be better neighbors, but now don't even know who lives next door. We may have forgotten the promise to be more alert to civic danger and yet also to defend fellow Americans who, because of their religion or nationalities, may have themselves been subject to unpardonable attack.

    This day, two years on, is the day to remember both the loss and the promises we made then. Commitment to community and America is something no terrorist can take away.
     
  4. Sneever Flion

    Sneever Flion New Member

    Oct 29, 2002
    Detroit, MI
    Unfortunately, there's nothing going on at work that could help take my mind off of the day. I'm not saying that I want to forget. Far from it.

    I don't know about you guys, but I wish that we would build a new skyscraper in the shape of the bird aimed at the eastern horizon. That should be symbol enough of what we think of those fcukers.
     
  5. Eggy

    Eggy New Member

    May 28, 1999
    CBUS
    Nothing will ever be fixed until we wipe out the whole middle east...just a fact.
     
  6. diablodelsol

    diablodelsol Member+

    Jan 10, 2001
    North Ridgeville, OH
    That is what you meant, right?
     
  7. Jay U

    Jay U New Member

    Dec 17, 1999
    Columbus
    I know I'll never forget. I remember everything about that morning very detailed. Its rather strange and eerie. September 11 happens to be my birthday and we had a big soccer game that night. I only had to drive about 3 mins to school....and I remember driving my brother's car to school that day and listening to POD " I feel so alive"...and something about the lyrics in the song combined with how oddly perfect and calm that morning seemed, casted a weird feeling on me for some reason. I remember sitting on a chair in front of a computer in tech class goofing off waiting for morning announcements. Someone told me there was news a plane hit one of the towers. I sadly laughed, thinking some yeah right...some news chopper probably hit the radio tower. Only when I checked CNN.com to see the breaking news stretched across a picture of the smoking tower did it set in. I spent the rest of the day in disbelief w. a lump in my throat glued to a TV.
     
  8. Jay U

    Jay U New Member

    Dec 17, 1999
    Columbus
    I think the most depressing aspect of post 9-11 is how quickly we, as americans separated. In the weeks following the attacks we were incredibly strong and supportive as a nation. I had never felt that sense of brotherhood with a stranger. We all seemed to put our petty values and political views to the side and stood strong. I think it goes to show, however, that we as americans are comparable to a family when faced with such stunning adversity. Sure, we may fight and feel like moving out sometimes...but if someone tries to tear us apart...we fight like hell. Its a shame though we cant be as patriotic all of the time....
     
  9. Grouchy

    Grouchy Member+

    turkey bacon with swiss
    Apr 18, 1999
    Canal Winchester
    Club:
    Columbus Crew
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I remember being downtown where I was working at the time, in a government building; listening to the whole thing play out in real time on the radio on Stern; being the only one for about 45 minutes that knew what was going on; getting the first images and video from the Internet; sitting in a cold sweat with a bladder ready to burst until about noon or so when the New York feed went off air.

    Out of all the things I remember overhearing amongst those in disbelief, those angry, those sobbing quietly as they left to get their children, the small group of folks of varied religions praying in the break room; was the guy running things down there - "Terrible as this is, it gives us the excuse we need to get rid of all of 'em (referring to middle-east terrorists)".
     
  10. hangthadj

    hangthadj BigSoccer Yellow Card

    A.S. Roma
    Mar 27, 2001
    Beacon, NY
    Club:
    Columbus Crew
    I think my most vivid memory of the day is 3stripe calling me on the phone from her classroom (2nd and 3rd grade) in tears asking "what am i gonna tell my kids?"

    I still don't know the answer.
     
  11. Plowmanoo

    Plowmanoo New Member

    Apr 18, 1999
    Columbus, OH
    I was in class when it all happend, and had to run downtown to pick something up. The shop guys had NPR on, and I vaguely listened to the reports about a plane hitting one of the towers. I thought I heard them say one had collapsed, but I didn't believe it...no one could do something like that, could they? I got to the HUB (Union Building) and saw a huge crowd gathered in the main lounge where there's a big screen, and I saw it right there, the 2nd tower going down.

    I still don't believe it could've really happend...could it?
     
  12. YITBOS

    YITBOS Member

    Jul 2, 2001
    1.3 hours from CCS
    Club:
    Columbus Crew
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Try this:
    Talking to your kids about 9/11 (Onion Article from the Holy Fvcking Sh!t Issue)

    The following excerpt is from an essay I have enjoyed that relates to the humor circulated after 9/11.Gallows Humor
    I don't think people have forgotten. We have learned to cope. Is this a stiuation that we will ever forget? I, for one, know that I will ALWAYS remember that morning in excrutiating detail.

    I was going to class, late as normal, and passed a couple people talking about a plane hitting a building. I joked about in class with a couple friends and then went to the commons to chill before my next class. I sat down, then someone turned on CNN just before the second plane was slamming into the tower. After that, I remember one kid dropping his books and saying "My dad works there" right before he ran out as fast as he could to call home. I never did find out who that kid was, or what happened to his dad...
     
  13. elderado

    elderado New Member

    Mar 5, 2001
    New York City
    I was already at work in Mid-town (the 50's incase you are unfamiliar) when the first tower was struck. My wife was still at home and our apt. is on Gold St and Fulton St. I called her to see if she had left for work yet. She picked up the phone and started to ask me if I had felt the earthquake -I told her turn on the TV - she just started to become upset and asking what was happening. I began to explain to her what little I knew and while we were on the phone the second plan hit.

    I begged her to get on the subway/bus and get out of the area but unfortunately the system had been shutdown by the time she got dressed and down to it. She went back to the apt.

    We continued talk and argue - she didn't want me to come back downtown and of course wanted to go to her.

    When the first tower fell we lost phone service for a few minutes - and if you remember the pictures it looked like all of lower Manhattan had disappeared - needless to say I started heading downtown in bit of a panic. Thankfully the phones came back a few minutes later and I called her on my cell phone while I began to walk the 70 or so blocks home. I didn't actually know the second tower fell until my wife told me as we periodically checked in with each other - it took me 2 hours to walk home.

    One image I still have in my mind, that I can't shake was as I walking downtown, there were THOUSANDS of people walking the other way and there was one women in particular - she was covered from head to toe in this gray dust as were many of the people - she had bandage on her head and one on her left foot - As she walked up The bowery (lower east side) she was leaving this grayish bloody footprints and she seemed to be in a daze.

    When I got downtown - which wasn't easy getting by the security- it was as if day turned to night. And if walked up Fulton towards the site you could feel the fires on your face from about 2 blocks away - which is where the security zone started.

    We were never evacuated as the news reported - you could leave if you had somewhere else to go - which we did for that weekend only though. And the subsequent months were very difficult with sporadic water, electricity, cable, etc.....but I considered myself lucky. I had several cousins who worked around the site and made it out, the building came straight down and not sideways - saving my wife and my neighborhood. Having grown up in and around NYC all my 30 years I lost no one in my immediate circle - a drinking buddy from college who I hadn’t seen in years and a distant cousin who was a fireman.

    Thanks for giving me the opportunity to share my story – it is cathartic.
     
  14. CrewToon

    CrewToon Member

    Jun 13, 1999
    Greenbrier Farm
    I was on I-71 driving to the 'Nati when the planes hit the towers.
     
  15. Eggy

    Eggy New Member

    May 28, 1999
    CBUS
    I was talking to Splarg on AIM. He told me one plane hit and I said "Yeah yeah, I'll turn on the TV in a bit" then he said another one hit and I thought he was having a laugh.

    Then I told him a plane hit the Pentagon and he thought I was having a laugh.
     
  16. melloyello

    melloyello Member

    Dec 19, 2000
    Columbus
  17. house18

    house18 Member

    Jun 23, 2003
    St. Louis, MO
    I woke up and went to UPS to pick up some new rims for my bicycle (I race) and couldn't figure out why the local sports station had news on it. When I realised what happened I raced home and watched until I had to go to soccer practice(coaching a college team at the time). it was very weird because we were all in shock and our practice field is in the flight path to the airport a couple of miles away, so we were used to planes flying over, but they were grounded. The odd thing is that the rest of the season an airliner would always fly over our stadium during the national anthem, no matter what time it was.
     

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