2020/21 Hot Seat

Discussion in 'Women's College' started by Chris Mahr, Aug 13, 2020.

  1. Chris Mahr

    Chris Mahr New Member

    Liverpool FC
    United States
    Mar 6, 2019
    Well we're 'techincally' in a new, so who's on possibly on deck for this coming academic year?
     
  2. Wildcatter

    Wildcatter Member

    Sep 9, 2018
    Was having this discussion with a friend today. What do you think ADs will do? If someone is in the final year of their contract and don’t get a chance to play. Will they get a one year extension or do you think the AD just doesn’t renew even though they didn’t get the last year of games in? Probably depends how well a coach is liked by the administration
     
  3. Wildcatter

    Wildcatter Member

    Sep 9, 2018
    I would also say there are a ton of coaches on the hot seat and it has nothing to do with results. I would say the entire program is on the hot seat of being dropped because of lack of funds
     
  4. Eddie K

    Eddie K Member+

    May 5, 2007
    #4 Eddie K, Aug 13, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2020
    It will be interesting to see how it plays out some places. Does an AD cut a coach they don't like or even an entire program because of the coach? Based on competence, their high salary, or just contract situation?

    For example, the AD's new hire with 4 years left in one sport vs a high paid coach that is due for renewal? I think the contract status is maybe a bigger factor than normal. There are some older higher-paid coaches that may be in more trouble then they expected to be. You won't see many coaches hired near the top end of the salary range with revenues down sharply. Some coaches have been giving salary back already and that's about to be expected again. Could be a major readjustment in many college sports.

    I also really feel for assistant coaches. I posted that I read a story saying 45% of assistant coaches were not renewed for this year. That was across all divisions. If there's no team to train, and a recruiting "dead period' continuing, I guess that's to be expected. There are likely a lot of international coaches with visa concerns as well. We could lose a lot of good young coaches.
     
  5. PoetryInMotion

    Feb 7, 2015
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    I wonder if we will see mid-major like coaches get out of the college game and go to club, or maybe leave the coaching profession altogether.

    On the program elimination front, a lot of schools don’t have a ton of wiggle room without dropping below 14 sports mandated at the division 1 level. I can’t imagine women’s sports will be the first to go, but these are unprecedented times. It’s really important for everyone in college athletics that the NCAA does not allow a wavier to this rule.

    I know Wright State dropped below and was applying for a wavier to stay d1 eligible, but don’t know if they got it.
     
  6. Cliveworshipper

    Cliveworshipper Member+

    Dec 3, 2006

    ...because of the massive paychecks for making sure Precious gets her orange slice at halftime.:laugh:
     
  7. ytrs

    ytrs Member

    Jan 24, 2018
    This is incredibly shitty of you to say. There are excellent club coaches, and many making very good money. I know many club coaches making more than college coaches. Shame on your ignorance. These coaches are putting players into college at top levels, putting others into the National Team pool.
     
    sockerdad06 repped this.
  8. Cliveworshipper

    Cliveworshipper Member+

    Dec 3, 2006
    Sorry, coach.
     
  9. Nacional Tijuana

    Nacional Tijuana BigSoccer Supporter

    May 6, 2003
    San Diego, Calif.
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Georgia Tech, which has been a well known name in varsity athletics throughout the years, has no soccer on the varsity level, men's or women's. They do have clubs for both. I'm intrigued by club sports. It can fill in gaps.
     
  10. PlaySimple

    PlaySimple Member

    Sep 22, 2016
    Chicagoland
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    Let me know if you find out anything about the waiver. I searched for something and couldn't find anything. I couldn't find any NCAA meeting minutes that pertained to this. All that I could find was a press release from Wright State:

    https://wsuraiders.com/news/2020/6/3/general-wright-state-athletics-announces-program-changes.aspx

    In your post you states that 14 sports are mandated at the D1 level. While it is true that 14 sports are required by NCAA Division I member institutions, the Wright State press released shows that the rule is a little more nuanced than that:

    "NCAA Division I member institutions are required to sponsor at least seven sports for men and seven for women (or six for men and eight for women) with two team sports for each gender."

    I'm fairly certain that @ytrs's original reference to club coaches was not about club coaches at the college level. It is a reference to the club sports that kids play at the high school level.
     
  11. sockerdad06

    sockerdad06 Member

    Sep 12, 2004
    There will be a lot of programs cut in athletic departments. Probably more Men's soccer/ Swimming and Diving/ Tennis before Women's soccer. doubt it will have anything to do with coach salary or contract length.
     
  12. PoetryInMotion

    Feb 7, 2015
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    I haven’t found anything on Wright State but it just said that they were applying in late June. Apparently kept membership as they have continued posting on Horizon League stuff.

    you’re right about it being nuanced. Regardless, Wright State is currently deficient, and let’s hope the NCAA doesn’t permit as a rule schools to drop below 14.
     
  13. Nacional Tijuana

    Nacional Tijuana BigSoccer Supporter

    May 6, 2003
    San Diego, Calif.
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    My apologies. @ytrs' mention of oranges makes more sense now.

    ETA: @Cliveworshipper , not @ytrs, sorry.
     
  14. RUfan

    RUfan Member

    Dec 11, 2004
    NJ
    Club:
    Sky Blue FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    The school's web site shows only 10 sports, five each for men and women.
     
  15. Cliveworshipper

    Cliveworshipper Member+

    Dec 3, 2006
    i believe the 14 team requirement is to compete as an D1 program. There are grandfathered and D2/D3 exceptions. Also, conferences have their minimum participation requirements for full membership.

    From the wiki:

    there is also a minimum attendance requirement to be a D1 FBS program.

    Wright state’s football team is a NCFA collegiate club level team. It doesn’t compete at the NCAA level.

    https://www.wrightstatefootball.com/who-we-are
     
  16. Cliveworshipper

    Cliveworshipper Member+

    Dec 3, 2006
    BYU men’s soccer played as a purchased franchise in the USL division two.(Formerly the Premier Development League)
    No scholarships, but they were unhampered by NCAA seasons or regulations.

    with the folding of the PDL, they may now be a colegiate club level team.
     
  17. Nacional Tijuana

    Nacional Tijuana BigSoccer Supporter

    May 6, 2003
    San Diego, Calif.
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    BYU club was interesting, too. I remember the PDL team, but thought that had withdrawn in the mid/late oughts. Bringing it back to woso, I'd love to see a university club enter WPSL or UWS. Vive la difference.
     
  18. ytrs

    ytrs Member

    Jan 24, 2018
    I am not a coach. I just laid out facts that you cannot dispute. Club coaches are making a lot of money these days. You are a jackass without any basis for your juvenile comment. But, then again, why would I expect less when you are a grown man who worships a coach.
     
  19. PoetryInMotion

    Feb 7, 2015
    Club:
    Liverpool FC
    they actually have 11, women’s track counts as two (indoor and outdoor)...they had 14 before cutting softball, as well as mens and womens tennis in June. This is why they need to petition the NCAA wavier for minimum sports sponsorship requirement to remain a fully eligible division 1 program (to be eligible for postseason etc.)

    if the NCAA were to reduce the number from 14 or grant such a wavier on a blanket basis, this could become a big problem for women’s soccer. If it doesn’t change, we will see most woso programs unaffected in terms of cutting programs, it’ll be budgets, assistants, scholarships, restrictions on scheduling.
     
  20. Cliveworshipper

    Cliveworshipper Member+

    Dec 3, 2006
    #20 Cliveworshipper, Aug 14, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2020

    People who run around calling others jackasses are the jackasses. The personal attacks come when you have nothing else

    Some club coaches make a good living. Most don’t., unless they are they have established themselves as leaders. That’s different than a club corporation doing well. The majority get paid by the session. Clubs are pretty saturated right now. In fact they are retrenching with the demise of development programs. The opportunities are pretty limited as existing coaches guard their own jobs. As coaches have left Or been fired, they go to club until they can land another college or pro job. Randy Waldrum is a good example.

    and many club programs are attached to college teams. At some schools, it’s part of .the compensation package.
     
    Footyballs repped this.
  21. ytrs

    ytrs Member

    Jan 24, 2018
    Woah! You are the one who did the condescending post, not I. I reacted by calling you what you are ... a jackass. Anyone who makes fun of another's profession is just that ... a jackass. Many club coaches make very good money. Why do you think so many assistant college coaches (and even some head coaches) also coach club? Because their collegiate positions are the ones lacking in pay. Maybe you should actually research it before attacking others professions. And, for f*cks sake, these professionals don't hand out orange slices. They are the ones developing players for college and a national teams. Own up to your as*hole-ish behavior.
     
  22. Footyballs

    Footyballs Member

    Barcelona
    United States Virgin Islands
    Dec 19, 2018
    Lol, Ytrs panties in a twirl once again. Why you on a college hot seat conversation Ytrs if you're not even a college coach? Lacking in the home social life department? Oh well, I digress.
     
  23. ytrs

    ytrs Member

    Jan 24, 2018
    I am not a club coach. That is what the post was about. He was taking juvenile potshots at club coaches and you are going to attack me for defending them with factual information? Many club coaches far exceed college coaches pay. Also parents are on here. Fans are on here. College coaches are on here. What does my profession have to do with being on here? We all have interest in soccer.
     
  24. PoptartKing

    PoptartKing Member

    Feb 11, 2020
    I think the opposite. Men's Soccer and other non-revenue sports are certainly on the hot seat. Women's soccer in most cases is well protected with title IX (especially at schools with football).

    I think it's cheaper to offer a one year contract to a coach rather than start a new coaching search (fly coaches in and bump salaries/budgets to attract good coaches).

    I think most of the openings will be positions that the decision was made before the pandemic (coaches in the 3rd year of a 4 year contract that they have under performed on) or openings due to coaches leaving the industry for more money/stability.

    Any guesses for either of these?
     
  25. Soccerguy1022

    Soccerguy1022 Member

    Manchester City
    United States
    Nov 28, 2018
    I see a lot of hot seat coaches getting a pass this year due to budgets and that alone. Their salary is already in the budget and schools aren’t going to spend more to bring in someone right now. So i think there are going to be a lot of women’s soccer coaches who are REALLY helped out by this and will keep their job for another year simply because of the money. And I could be wrong, but just my thoughts. And yes, a lot of Men’s programs will be in jeopardy next year after the financial short falls from the past 2 financial cycles
     

Share This Page