U.S. Soccer coaching curriculum (Great stuff!

Discussion in 'Youth & HS Soccer' started by truthandlife, Apr 23, 2011.

  1. Pete Bond

    Pete Bond Member

    Oct 25, 2006
    You will never be able to put the blame for what has happened to our game on one of the big three.

    You have to include all three: parents/parent politicians/club and state DOC"S.

    So, I am asking for centralized control to reel in the wild, wild, west.

    There are no financial models that will change the finances, and the resulting corruption of the game, that currently exists. Its too late. I can see that you don't see it, and haven't understood that from my writings. Or, you disagree. Well, I believe I was where you are currently at, about 7 years ago. I have watched soccer in many areas dramatically regress.

    Reel in the parents? Really???

    The leviathan has grown too large. It will only be corralled by force.

    Too direct? Yes, I no longer spend hours trying to beat around the bush, anticipating people's feelings, when getting to the point. I've been in this battle for a long time. In many, many ways things are actually getting worse, not better (player development, playing style, playing philosophy, corruption). I'm fighting a losing battle. I don't like to lose. I've invested 30 years of my life in coaching the game -- 47 including playing. If someone is too sensitive to read my stuff, try to get it, make a judgement, and then move on, well they aren't going to help initiate the change we need anyway.

    I'll try once again. The only way you can change this situation with youth soccer is by US Soccer teaming up with US Youth Soccer. They must mandate that all State Associations develop state run leagues for REC and Clubs to play in. They then must establish guidelines for independent clubs to operate (be chartered). By withdrawing, threatening their charter they then would have leverage to dictate initiation of programs, procedures, and standards.

    I may be wrong, but I'm convinced I'm not. I have read through all your responses. I wish someone would spend a few minutes telling me why I'm wrong.
     
  2. Pete Bond

    Pete Bond Member

    Oct 25, 2006
    Porinoki,

    I have never, ever, once lived in a State where they had a Director of Coaching who was a good teacher of the game. Never, ever had one who worked hard at all. Never had one that established leadership and tried to manage a program. Never had one that put 1/100 of the time and effort needed to build a viable ODP program.

    Come to think of it, I've never lived in a place where the State DOC wasn't a rip off -- A Complete and toal rip-off! Everbody just wonders "what is that these guys do?" Answer is... they are gangsters, mobsters, money making machines.

    They are a huge part of the problem.

    No accountability to anyone outside of the parental politician whose bidding they usually serve. A tool.

    Specifics? I'd love to give them to you and name names.

    I realize that your experience is different.

    I realize that other's experiences are different. I know there are some good ones.

    But, I wonder how many can be described as you did yours? It seems like individuals from parts of New York, Penn, Virginia, some of these places have really made sure they hired a good person who fits the requirements of the job.

    There are 50 States.

    Ever had a situation where a club or two control the State Board and they control who is hired? The guy they hire ends up being a tool, a corrupt tool, for the clubs who sign his check and who he owes the job to? No? Well, I got news for you.

    Ever had a situation where a guy drew near 6 figures and did absolutely nothing for 10 years? Ran the game into the ground? Lost thousands of registered players every year? Ran around (travelled) and double dipped off of US Soccer, collected his awards, made lousey DVD's that set the game back 20 years, left the game in shambles, and then retired in Florida to collect more awards?

    Ever had a situation where the DOC's main claim to fame, after 6 years on the job, were 3 DWI's (one where he totalled the State Soccer Van), and
    b%#@&ed a record number of female licensing candidates?

    How about the State (big soccer State) who hired a coach who had just been released from his previous job as a club DOC, for embezzling thousands of dollars? He moved right into the new State DOC position and a year later is gone. Guess what he did!

    Mobster, Gangster, Back Country Hillbilly Politics. It doesn't only happen in the small States.

    How about you guys from Illinois? Chicago seems to have some decent soccer and structure. Is your DOC a builder of the game? Is he a teacher of the game? Are his priorities in order? Is he a hard worker? Does he believe in a strong technical base for 8-12 year olds? What is his philosophy? Is playing the ball on the ground emphasized?

    Your ODP program, how is it?

    Has he shown leadership in bringing the top coaches in his State together and tried to get them on the same page, on the same team, in order to improve player development?
     
  3. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    I've lived and grown up in two of the places you mentioned, Pete so my view on DOCs are slanted to the positive.
     
  4. Mirzam

    Mirzam Member

    Jan 21, 2010
    @Dick's
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    England
    I have a question for you all. How about the MLS what part can they/should they play in all this? They have money, although it seems little of it is put towards youth soccer. Do you think the future of US youth soccer might lie in that direction?
     
  5. Pete Bond

    Pete Bond Member

    Oct 25, 2006
    I still wish for the positive.

    I began coaching in Southern California. To this day, I think its the best youth soccer environment in the world (yes, even in lieu of the fact that the English Invasion, no not the Beatles, completely overtook San Diego). I believe that up to U12 any child would benefit from living there. People in Southern Cal don't have to read this stuff. They practically have their own soccer country. The free market worked down there. They still have many problems, but the game survives and thrives in spite of them. There are so many options.

    In many other places, politics are used to reduce options. That is how many recruiting based cultures grow and succeed. The more options the kids have the more honesty and integrity the coaches and directors are required to have.

    A free market model will work if there is a sheriff to police those who collude to build monopolies.

    Two or three clubs can actually work together (collude) to ensure financial success. I've seen it done. They established a standard of mediocrity. They don't have to work hard, they don't have to get their licenses, they don't even have to win! Where I live, we have one Englishman (once got a trial at _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ , yada, yada has an "English Coaching Diploma" No not a prelim or full badge, an "English Coaching Diploma") For 10 years he used to lose, at State Cup, every single year, on purpose. He didn't want to coach for the extra 6 weeks to take them through Regionals if he wasn't going to make additional money for it. He pilfered his 60,000 from his club and had no way to charge parents for the additional time. He didn't care, still doesn't.

    How does this rant become evident? He has been allowed for decades to operate in a yahoo, hillbilly, soccer state because he took away options. He aided the two big clubs who had a huge vested interest in keeping the level of mediocrity going and keeping the standard down. They needed to win to keep things the way they wanted, but they didn't really want to coach kids, do quality training, learn and improve themselves with coaching education, they didn't want to travel. This guy would chase his older teams away every year, then in the spring he would wear his Diadora short shorts, get tan, and really amp up his English accent. He would recruit 3 U11 teams and could destroy any start ups trying to do something new. The parents knew, but once spring came they fell for the same schtik every year. They would respond with "we didn't know." Then they'd do the same thing next year. The two big fish, money making clubs, knew they could supplement their teams with his players once they got to U13 or 14. Most of all, they knew that between them, and his little racket, it was impossible for someone else to sustain a club, regardless of the quality, for more than a year or two. They could drive out competition. Many top coaches came, and left. Still do to this day.

    Gangsters -- Mobsters. Parents who destroy from within.

    The game of soccer, the kids, are used as W_ _ _ _ s.

    When the State DOC, the guy entrusted with the game -- the supposed Sheriff. When he becomes a player in this sordid drama, and the conflict of interest is there for all to see, but we all just ignore it, what do you do? What do you do when the coach mentioned in the paragraph above is a close buddy with the State DOC? Is partially responsible for him getting the job? Employs the State DOC's wife?

    You watch the devastation. You speak up, but they don't listen. You watch kids leave the game in droves.

    Once again, we have over 19 million registered soccer players and one Landon Donavon to show for it. I've watched this whole thing unfold since 81. For the most part, nobody in US Soccer, and especially US Youth soccer is held accountable.

    If Claudio fails, he won't be held accountable. We will all just make excuses.

    Ideas, money, I don't think they are the most important things we need for change. We need to reign in a corrupt system that never should have been allowed to continue on this path in the first place. That and establish a new one with some accountability.

    The solutions are easy. They aren't complicated.
     
  6. Pete Bond

    Pete Bond Member

    Oct 25, 2006
    Mirzam,

    The curriculum, youth development, is somewhat separated from MLS.

    You will have people boldly state: But, MLS is linking up with youth clubs in other states who do not have MLS teams. That will allow them to develop young players and not just in MLS cities.

    Reality is, what I see is that they get some really decent marketing and branding in those cities (ie Las Vegas). On the development end, they occasionally allow coaches to travel to the club and receive a coaches seminar from Nigel Higgenbottem on the complexities of the flat back four, or something thereof.

    Ajax succeeds because 70% of Dutch kids would do anything to play for Ajax. Once there, they develop players. They develop real players. I've been there. I've been trained by their coaches.

    Youth Soccer in the United States in 95, 96, 97 was really beginning to be something. It was fun. It was exciting. The World Cup sparked the "ignition" that was great to be a part of. I had great hope for the game, for the future.

    The US brought in a top guy and paid him over a half million to review our player development and to turn it upside down. He did and wrote a report. A report that we ignored. Entirely ignored. The "know it alls" even mocked it.

    The primary element in the report. The biggest single suggestion, that we could have easily done, was dismissed by everyone including Bruce Arena.

    That suggestion, that element, is now the #1 thing that Germany credits for turning around their once stagnant, dead in the water youth system.

    In 98 I was walking accross a field at my B license and I went to the US Soccer Director of Coaching (there actually was one with that title at the time) and I asked him "what happened with Querioz?" why didn't he take the job as National Team Coach like he was lined up to do? He responded with one sentence and then repeated it a little later:

    Querioz believed we have no chance of success. "All of our decisions are being made by people who have never stepped between the lines." This was a very dangerous career choice for him.

    "All of our decisions are being made by people who have never stepped between the lines."

    Then the invasion happened.

    Its no wonder we are where we are at.

    MLS? Its not going to hurt. The academies will develop some players even if most of them currently are developing kids from out of country.

    But, the potential we are p_ _ s _ _ _ away is not going to stop anytime soon. It hurts to see that.
     
  7. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    We are not supposed to be concerned about teaching team tactics to pre-teens.
     
  8. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    No. If we wait for that, we will be waiting 20-30 years. Even in Europe, professional clubs only touch a small portion of youth soccer. There are 20 million youth players in the US.
     
  9. Pörinoki

    Pörinoki Member

    Apr 15, 2011
    A few good DOC I know either bounced around to find a state where they can work and get things right, or simply locked themselves in the ivory tower and accepted that they can not change this diabolical system. Are they good enough then?
     
  10. Pete Bond

    Pete Bond Member

    Oct 25, 2006
    Some pretty heavy stuff, yet not alot of feedback.

    Makes you wonder...
     
  11. mostpreferignorance

    mostpreferignorance New Member

    Nov 2, 2010
    Club:
    FC Barcelona
    Country:
    United States
    I have a similar experience where I live. I would like to write about just how lazy/lethargic/ uncommitted to the game our DOC is. (This is just one example) Where I live the DOC has appointed local Club President to be a regional representative (over our portion of the state). This club president is the first to hear about new kids moving into the area, recieves all of the team rosters from competing clubs, and is the go-between for local clubs and the state. The club he represents has 3 "D" licensed coach and no director of coaching - the rest of the coaches are parents. Meanwhile, other teams have their parents called for recruiting reasons during all times of the year and nobody can get through to the state unless they are contacted directly. I have heard the state DOC comment that soccer in our area is the most undeveloped in the state, but when told about this problem in particular, his comment is something close to..."but that is our policy." Wow. Talk about sitting around for a paycheck!
    We talk about rating systems for clubs (which is a good idea), but it won't solve the problems that we have when the system is broke. The tires may be full, but we will never get where we need to be when the driver doesn't have directions (or a clue).
     
  12. Mirzam

    Mirzam Member

    Jan 21, 2010
    @Dick's
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    England
    PB, thanks for taking the trouble to answer my question. But I have to ask, what was the primary element in the report that Germany has used with such success?

    My son does play for an MLS youth team and he is getting a great deal of interest from the senior trainers in the club, it seems they have hope for him making it. Very flattering, but he works very hard. We'll see.....
     
  13. Pete Bond

    Pete Bond Member

    Oct 25, 2006
    Does your club have a history of filling the older age groups with players from outside the country? Some do. Does your son spend time each week on aspects of the 1V1 environment?

    Obviously I didn't specify because I needed to throw out a teaser to see if we could get some people to bite and join in.

    Maybe this is getting too close and people are familar with each other and can't come out for fear of ....

    Recently, I think it was either my copy of Success in Soccer (co-written through the DFB), or Champions where Germany's youth program was broken down and the primary change they made, that they gave credit to for creating success, was one of the very same programs (in my opinion it was always the most important, the most relevant one) the Q Report suggested we implement -- 13 years ago. Of course it pi$$ed me off and sent me through the roof.

    Does anyone have a guess?
     
  14. soccershins

    soccershins Member

    Jan 3, 2011
    Club:
    FC Porto
    Something that this article brought up, almost goes without saying, is the lack of humility that most US coaches have. Many of the coaches of 'elite teams' will scream and try to put their hand in every decision so they can make an impact like most coaches in other major sports, but like Reyna points out, that's not the way to get it done when you look at other top flight coaches around the world.

    Humble Coaches key for Player Devlopment

    Is this missing the point or do you think that the coaches' attitudes are having a large impact on player development?
     
  15. de Kromme

    de Kromme Member

    Jan 26, 2009
    Burbville
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    Netherlands
    American coaches largely coach soccer the way we coach our other sports. Soccer is fundamentally a players sport. American sports are largely coaches sports. They fail to see that.

    Coaching soccer this way (far too much time on formations and tactics and systems before, say, u12 or u14) imposes a false ceiling on our players. So when they produce a "great" (read: winning) team, we think they've done their job. Really? Imagine how much better they'd be if they were allowed to learn the game, as opposed to being rigidly taught it from U6 on.

    Do we know why the majority of players on any given "superteam" at age, say, u12 aren't even playing the sport at 18? It's not simply because other players passed them by. It's because they never were allowed to love it and express themselves in it. There is no joy in it for them, even if they've won State Cups etc. because they haven't learned the true game. It becomes a been-there done-that kind of problem. They don't learn to enjoy the game for it's essence, which is an amazing expression of individual abilities and individual decision-making that they are forced to share and integrate with others, and to enjoy the same qualities in others, in a free-flowing fashion. They can only be told so many times by their screaming American coach to "get to the damn endline and cross the damn ball" (for example), even if they're successful at it and win because of it.

    The ones that put up with it, or don't mind it, end up playing in college where mediocre soccer reigns supreme. They've done exactly what their coaches told them all through their careers, and their reward is the pinnacle of averageness. The rest, who give it up, are the ones I ache for. That is the group of players I think would have produced a special player if only they had been nurtured and developed instead of being yelled at and blindered.

    That should tell us something.
     
  16. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    The more you write, the more "golden nuggets" I find, but you still have too much rhetoric. Perhaps it is due to your passion for the game which is laudable, but it also makes your posts difficult to follow.
     
  17. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    Well put. But "overcoaching" also hurts matches with senior players. It takes away the players' ability to adapt to circumstances. It makes teams who must wait for the coach'es halftime instructions to change a team tactic relatively inflexible compared to a team with a "player's coach." As I am sure you know, traditionally coaching during the match came from the team captain. Sideline coaching was banned by the LOTG. Today the super sideline coach has stolen the role of captain, and the game is poorer for it.
     
  18. so1mio

    so1mio Member

    Jan 10, 2007
    Lake Zurich
    Club:
    FC Kaiserslautern
    Country:
    Germany
    I like it. Like it a lot but I can't think of a single doc in iwsl, yssl, or nisl who would go along with this idea. Oh, wait... maybe that's the problem.
     
  19. Mirzam

    Mirzam Member

    Jan 21, 2010
    @Dick's
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    England
    I would say no, my son has only been with the club one year (they start at u11), but the DA boys do practice after the younger boys and I have not seen any foreign players. One of the other two DA clubs in the state, I have been told, do get boys from Africa.

    My son does spend time each week on 1v1, both at club/team training and pre-ODP training which is pretty much a waste of time. With his club he spends a lot of time on fast footwork, passing and moving at speed, the boys only play small-sided games in practice also. He has been working on 1v1 since he was a six year old in an academy environment with an American coach who started his own private academy style program for little ones up to 9 yo. This guy coaches a PDL/USL team, was a college coach and has placed over 50 players into professional contracts both in the MLS and several internationally. Two of his former players, played in South Africa for the USA World Cup team. At 8 my son moved on to another trainer (the guy from West Ham) because he outgrew the academy program and started training and playing with boys several years older than him. My son has been well trained and it shows.
     
  20. de Kromme

    de Kromme Member

    Jan 26, 2009
    Burbville
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    Netherlands
    I've been thinking about the shared opinion of many of us on this point and others about individual clubs' and DOC's reluctance to buy into stringent new standards from the Fed.

    What if the Fed simply said: "ok, then, buh-bye now".

    Here's how it could play out. Fed says: these are new developmental standards, not guidelines. They will be enforced hard, and policed. You will all host one tournament per season where all profit will go to enforcement, you will all do XYZ or you will be dropped.

    If you don't want in, take off.

    Let's say the Fed gets buy in from 1/4 to 1/3 of the players/clubs who value what the Fed is trying to do. That's X million kids.

    After 3-4 years, I hope you'd begin to see results. Fed affiliates would presumably start to beat some, if not a majority, of the non-Fed teams, and would be doing it the "right" way, at least according to our definition.

    Further, the Fed clearly would begin taking many more players for their age-group National programs from Fed-affiliated clubs, because those clubs would be only ones really producing the kind of players they've been wanting, so of course they'd pluck them first.

    So eventually, the non-affiliates are both 1. losing games and 2. losing opportunities for their players to advance.

    Parents get on the DOC's or clubs' backs saying "why isn't my kid in the U47 picture anymore? I'm leaving for (whatever affiliated club) unless you start doing the same thing and affiliate already!"

    Eventually we get back to a much higher affiliation but this time it's for the right reasons and everyone has a common goal that they are actually working toward.

    Most good footballing nations on earth probably don't have much more than X million kids to work with anyway, and yet they produce good if not great football. So I can't imagine we couldn't improve all of our age-group teams with X million as a start, and finally catch the world by the time we get that back up to 2x or 3x that amount.

    Of course these figures are fairly random, but the process seems like it might actually be possible.

    Thoughts?
     
  21. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    This is a critical observation. Quality not quantity.
     
  22. Pete Bond

    Pete Bond Member

    Oct 25, 2006
    I'll try again:

    1. US Youth Soccer and US Soccer come to an agreement. US Youth is the regulating/enforcement arm.

    2. State Associations run the leagues -- take over the leagues. I've seen it done. US Youth Soccer must, must, must hold them accountable. It must be a daily agenda -- a constant, a total, "buy in" and onslaught.

    3. State Associations are then required to charter local soccer clubs -- soccer businesses. To be chartered, clubs must meet certain, reasonable standards -- ONE OF WHICH IS THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A TECHNICAL, TECHNIQUE BASED ACADEMY THAT PROVIDES ALL PLAYERS AT LEAST ONE DAY A WEEK OF TECHNICAL TRAINING. These businesses need to play games. They can only operate properly if they can play their club teams in the competitive leagues -- which the State Associations run. (I've seen this done. The added revenue from league fees easily pays for administrators that the State Association has to hire to run the league.

    4. The Technical Academy has specific curriculum requirements that are set down by US Youth Soccer.

    5. Clubs are given one to two years to establish and get running the Technical Academy. They have to have a Technical Academy as a part of their club. (Poorly run clubs in my hillbilly state are currently bringing in over three quarters of a million dollars just off of initial player fees. Hiring one director to overlook the technical academy is easily doable.)

    6. Enforcement: Possible suspension of a clubs charter if they have not established the minimum standards required. State DOC's (those wonderfully honest men with high integrity who will certainly look out for the good of the game) and their assistants, must get off their butts and go out and observe the clubs and "inspect". Threaten thief buddies with probation, etc... The best thing would be a DOC who threatened the clubs that if they don't get in line, they will start communicating to the community that a club is in danger of losing their charter. Things would clean up quickly in most cases. The wild west is certainly being tamed at this point.

    You want the "barca way" then make sure the curriculum coincides with the barca way. Ajax/KNVB way... A mixture of both? Toss in some Brazilian (futsal program, etc.) You act like this is hard. It is not.

    Please, Please,

    Explain where this falls short! TELL ME WHAT IS WRONG WITH THIS!!!Then present your idea.

    I keep reading new ideas but i wonder how much time has gone into thinking them out. I realize that this will make some mad, but unless you have been deep into this, deep into the muck and mire, I'm not sure how you can come up with something that will actually work. The structure that exists, the reality of how the parental politicians work, the reality of how DOC's that make almost 6 figures off of this scam work, the reality of how parents work when they can't handle confrontation so they just carve everything up behind your backs... If you don't have a plan to neutralize all this you are beating a dead horse.

    Nobody even comments on my plan. They just come up with something. Ideas are what has gotten us into this mess. Ideas from parents (I'm not suggesting you are just parents) but ideas from parent politicians are responsible for this disaster, and the continuation of this disaster.

    Ideas, when it comes to Youth Soccer, can be very dangerous. VERY DANGEROUS!

    You are dealing with mobsters and you want to take money out of their pockets. They are in collusion with the State DOC's and the State Associations. When you come up with a new "financial model" or idea on how to round up the mob, their paid off cops, etc... make sure it has bite or you will be taken out (politically). Can you see this? They see "player development" advocates as people who are threatening their mortgage, taking food off their table, sterilizing the golden goose.

    If you don't understand the reality of the muck and mire, then you probably can't argue against my plan. Do you understand exactly what is out there? I've spent 2 years as an acting State DOC, been a club director numerous times, been a State Director for the NSCAA, started two successful leagues, been on all kinds of boards, fought tooth and nail with all kinds of high ranking US Youth Soccer mobsters. Many of my old friends are current mobsters, many have gone over to the dark side. Tell me what is wrong with my plan, and then give us ideas.

    Ever noticed how player development people are always the ones that are blackballed? Labelled "hard headed" and talked down about. Labelled "hard to work with"? Its a shame.

    Cruyff, Wiel Coerver, Derek Armstrong (with Nomads), Alex Ferguson, Wenger, Van Gaal, etc...

    Unless player development advocates have a leader that can stand up against those who have already established their power, who are already making a lot of money off of children's soccer, then there is no chance, no chance for change.

    Be real.
     
  23. de Kromme

    de Kromme Member

    Jan 26, 2009
    Burbville
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    Netherlands
    First, I don't at all see how my last post in any way conflicts with yours. But aside from that you've answered your own question. We can't comment on something that you specifically (and only you, by your account) has experienced so deeply, and we sure can't comment on YOUR solution to something you claim only YOU have experienced in this fashion. But I've basically argued the same exact points without knowing any of the people you can probably recite by name.

    So please resist the urge to continue to denigrate the rest of us responsible posters who are genuinely voicing our thoughts. You're yelling so loudly you can't even hear that I have basically said everything that you did.

    Maybe the Fed just doesn't like your selling skills. Your anger is best directed at the source of the problem.

    And if you really think that we concerned and committed posters who agree with you on the real issues are, in fact, part of that problem, then God help you. You say you've seen how blackballing works, and yet somehow you want all of us to walk that plank with you. Is the argument that it's impossible to blackball 100's of people, so we should take up arms with you, adopt your snide attitude and march on Chicago? When that fails, then what?

    Done with this. Now we're arguing amongst ourselves. Well done, Pete. You've fallen for their trap.
     
  24. Pete Bond

    Pete Bond Member

    Oct 25, 2006
    de kromme,

    If you just responded to my specific points and didn't get into this "your too mean, too aggressive, you alienate us, you attacked me stuff, we might have been able to get a number of people to respond to particulars. Man, I just want to see direct responses to specific points. Many people have made it clear that they want me to spend hours making sure I am indirect so as to not make them feel bad. I'm asking people to attack my points. Attack me. But, please, no more "you made me feel bad" stuff. Attack my specific points and make me look stupid. Validate my points, even better. But, I'm not going to change. It takes too long to write within a politically correct veil.
     
  25. de Kromme

    de Kromme Member

    Jan 26, 2009
    Burbville
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    Netherlands
    Good sir, it would take an army of people like to you make me feel bad. And you aint' got an army.

    Go tilt at your windmills.
     

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