Roman: Complete Attacking Midfielder

Discussion in 'Players & Legends' started by el-torero, Apr 20, 2014.

  1. BocaBoiUK

    BocaBoiUK Member

    Jan 26, 2010
    South Shields
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    England
    @el-torero Very much enjoyed reading the thread, and props for all the effort you have put in. ROman remains my favourite ever player and one of the main reasons behind my love affair with Boca.
     
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  2. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    thanks for the compliment

    now, i'm not enjoying the football like when roman still roaming on the pitch
     
  3. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    riquelme's (27 y.o., villarreal) vs barcelona (2005 la liga; home)

    longer version (9:00 min +), before it was a 3:00 min + version.

    man of the match against superstars barcelona team including ronaldinho, deco, xavi, eto'o etc.

     
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  4. leadleader

    leadleader Member+

    Aug 19, 2009
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    #154 leadleader, Oct 10, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2015
    Amazing player, I love how refined and elegant he was technique-wise, but without becoming another Zidane/Redondo to add to the "elegant list" of (cliche) players.

     
    el-torero repped this.
  5. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    another article about him:

    Adios Riquelme - The End of The Classic Trequartista
    Juan Roman Riquelme's retirement signifies the end of a special type of player which we can only look back on with nostalgia
    While the role may have evolved and not died, there is no doubt in my mind that the Riquelme type playmaker will not be seen at the top levels of the game again.
    “His type is an endangered species. Something special will be lost from football if they die out altogether.” Tim Vickery
    [​IMG]

    In many countries, notably in South America, yet also in Holland and Italy - the number 10 is a cult figure. He is iconic. This is the most important position on the pitch. This player is seen romantically as an artist, a man who can produce moments of brilliance. The No.10 shirt carries a sense of expectation and responsibility, especially true in Argentina where Diego Maradona became a god-like figure to the nation.
    At the turn of the 21st century the number 10, the trequartista, was a dominant force in the world of football. In fact it was a golden era for this type of player. The creative brilliance of trequartista's like Francesco Totti, Rivaldo, Jari Litmanen, Alessandro Del Piero, Zinedine Zidane, Rui Costa, Dennis Bergkamp, Gianfranco Zola and Juan Roman Riquelme were lighting up the game. These players were the ‘classic’ 10, playing between the forward line and midfield, controlling games and dictating play. They all possessed skill, creativity, and vision. They were the geniuses of their sides.
    English football didn't seem to value the playmaking 10 yet other nations seemed to value this role and player a lot more. I remember in my teenage years playing Championship Manager 2000/2001 and coming across this player called Juan Roman Riquelme playing at Boca Juniors. His stats were incredible and I made sure I purchased him for Aston Villa on every new managerial run (he helped me conquer Europe!) He was sublime and became a favourite of mine without actually ever seeing him play. He became an icon for me.
    Now for all the similarities with him and Maradona – the club, the shirt, the expectation of Argentinians – these two players couldn’t be more different. Maradona was energy, he was a dribbler, he was the man who took on the whole team both on and off the pitch. He was how we view Lionel Messi today, and this type of player may never cease to exist. Riquelme however differed in physique, personality and style to Diego. The fans thought they had found the ‘second coming’ yet in fact this was different breed of player. Yet whereas Diego Maradona could well have played in any era, there is a sense that Riquelme was suited to a particular era in football.

    Being valued can make the difference
    A move to Barcelona in 2002 meant Riquleme would be following Diego once again. However this was not to be an enjoyable experience for the player. The manager at the time Louis van Gaal sighted ‘political’ reasons for the signing and used him sparingly. When he did play he put him out wide. This was a player who was built to play central. He was the ‘classic 10’, yet was wasted by van Gaal.
    The hope of seeing this creative playmaker playing in Europe, of him lighting up the Champions League and becoming a major player in European football never materialised at Camp Nou. However it would be the move to Villareal would which enable Europe to truly see the wonder and splendour of Riquelme. The key for the player was that the team was built and revolved around him.
    There was a consensus in his home country that Riquelme requires complete control of the team in order to feel motivated enough to play. If not, then he will often retreat and play with almost no interest. As well as this character issue, many argued that he was too slow and unaccommodating, that he would only play only at his own pace. At Villareal he found a team where he could lead, where he was in control, where he was loved. And from there he dictated the pace of the game, and thrived.
    2005/2006 would be his greatest year, his ‘coming out’ season as crazy as that sounds considering he was 27 years old. Under Riquelme’s creative talent Villareal would go all the way to the Champions League semi-final’s where they would meet Arsenal. Under coach Manuel Pellegrini Villareal’s magical season should have seem them reach the final to play Barcelona. Although 1-0 down from the first leg they were incredible in the second leg and should have scored 3-4 goals. They won a penalty in the final minutes of the game and up stepped the star man Riquelme, the man who had become regarded as Europe's best playmaker that season. And yet his shot was saved. The dream was over for the Yellow Submarine.
    Riquelme had risen to become one of Europe’s finest playmakers, and in the 2006 World Cup his coach José Pekerman gave Riquelme the Number 10 shirt for the first time ever. It was a statement from the coach that Riquelme was to be the leader of the team. It is interesting to note here that Pekerman had chosen to omit Juan Sebastian Veron from the squad at this tournament. This is important because Veron had been the previous ‘creative leader’ of the national team, especially under Marcelo Bielsa in the 2002 World Cup. On this occasion Pekerman decided Riquelme would be Argentina’s best hope.
    Let us just consider Veron for a second, because there is a certain trend between these Argentinian playmakers, which is important to assess when we consider their impact on games. When he moved to Man Utd he was regarded as one of the best playmakers of the time. And his move to Manchester could have been great yet it ended up being seen as a flop . The fact that his time at Manchester United did not work was, in part, due to the difficulties United’s midfield had in adapting to a new style. For so long they were used to a four man flat midfield. Veron couldn’t fit in and they could not adapt to him. Veron was expected to play in the centre with Roy Keane, but the two proved incompatible. Keane was not like Simeone, he was a box-to-box midfielder who importantly led and organised the side. He would not acquiesce to Veron’s wish to be his worker, allowing Veron to control games. For his previous clubs and country Veron was used to controlling games and was often afforded a free role where he would roam and dictate the play. Keane would not permit him this role and Veron could not adapt to what was expected of him.
    Many will argue that the pace and intensity of the Premier League was an issue yet it was more about his ability to govern games and set the tempo. Under Marcelo Bielsa, for Argentina, Veron excelled because he was given the freedom to control the team. Under Bielsa’s high tempo attacking style Veron would be the playmaker that exposed sides with his long range and creative passing. Veron had all the ability and intelligence to be regarded as one of the best playmakers in the game however his move to Manchester United was undermined by bad timing and a failure to build a side around him.
    This is the same as what has been seen with Riquelme. However in that 2006 World Cup the world witnessed the splendour of what Riquleme could do when the team was in his control. He was a genius, a maestro, the dictator of games. In the 6-0 demolition of Serbia Argentina were incredible, and Riquelme was the one pulling the strings.

    A special talent who needs to feel special
    Now this type of player is a special breed, Riquelme and Veron were players who chose how to play to the game, they decided the tempo, the direction and sought to make the game theirs. As Jorge Valdano, a member of Argentina's World Cup-winning team of 1986 says of Riquelme, 'When the ball reaches him it has to stop. The rhythm and direction of play will depend, to a great degree, on Riquelme's level of inspiration.” This inspiration has shown to come from his feeling of being loved, adored and wanted by his team, coach and fans. The more control on the game he has, the better Riquelme becomes.
    Argentina looked like they would go on to win the tournament. They appeared the stand out best side there and with Riquelme working his creative magic it seemed Argentina’s hopes of winning the World Cup once again were to be met. And yet, in the quarter finals against hosts Germany Pekerman made one of the craziest and most ludicrous decisions in World Cup history. Argentina were winning 1-0 after a Riquelme corner set up Ayala to score. And then on 72 minutes Riquelme was replaced by Cambiasso. Pekerman was looking to kill the game off and win 1-0. Eight minutes later Miroslav Klose equalised and the match would ultimately go to penalties in which Germany would progress. The tournament which seemed built for Riquelme to take his side all the way, was over, and he was left to watch over 50 minutes of that final game on the bench. It could have been his greatest moment, instead Argentina’s best chance for success was taken away by a terrible tactical decision.
    After that tournament Riquelme stayed at Villareal for 18 months yet the club or himself never recaptured the form of that 2005/2006 season. He would return to Boca Juniors in 2007 and remain there till 2014, winning the Premier Division twice, the Copa Libertadores and the Copa Argentina.

    The evolving role of the playmaker
    At the turn of the century Riquelme personified what the ‘10’ was about for Argentinians and purists of the game; technically brilliant, creative, self-regulating, languid and… rigid. Riquelme, for all his talent, wasn’t the most athletic or hardworking of playmakers, yet in possession he was magnificent. His game was built on playing between the lines and, when he was afforded the time and space to exploit he was magnificent.
    As the 2000’s progressed, tactics changed and the 10 position required a player with more dynamism. We started to see players like Kaka and Gerrard excel. It appeared that Riquelme’s lack of mobility and zip prevented him shifting his game to meet more contemporary needs. In 2006 it appeared we were seeing the closing stages of the ‘classic playmaker’. 2006 – the year where Riquleme had come so close for both club and country, the year in which Bergkamp and Zidane would retire from football. Del Piero's final World Cup. Was this the passing of the baton? The treqaurtista’s swan song before a new era was to emerge?

    During the 1990’s and early 2000’s the No.10 would take up a position between the opposition’s defence and midfield and seek to run the game in this area. For many years this worked and these players became masters on the pitch… however the 4-2-3-1 effectively closed off this space. As coaches sought to stifle the space which the 10 liked to operate in - with the introduction of the defensive midfielder - the 10 had to change how they played. No longer could the 10 simply stay ‘in the hole’ between the defence and midfield, because many sides were now plugging that space with defensive midfielders. The introduction of two holding midfielders was introduced to near guarantee that the space for the ‘10’ was shut off entirely. The spaces which the trequartista loved to exploit had been taken away. Coaches therefore needed to adapt their playmaker’s role.

    Instead of playing ‘in the hole’ they now sought to make their 10’s more lateral in their movement, to play wider in order to create space for both themselves and others. The reasoning was that this creative player could find more space and time to create for the team, or that if the defensive midfielder was instructed to stay close to the playmaker, then their movement away from central areas would open space centrally for others to exploit.

    During the mid-2000’s, as the game became more physical and athletic, it was evident that the 10 had evolved to become more of a strong midfielder who would possess not just skill but athleticism too. And yet just as the athletically powerful ‘10’ was prospering, a new type was coming through, one which was set to dominate football and change the course of
    the future game more than any other.
    If the turn of the century was the ‘era of the trequartista’ with the rise of the ‘athletic 10’ then the Barcelona era was most certainly the era of the ‘fluid 10’. We were now seeing players who roamed into wide areas in order to create the time and space to expose the opposition.
    When Barcelona lifted the Champions League in 2006 it was a sign of things to come. Although Ronaldinho and Samuel Eto’o would steal the spotlight the success that night pointed to where the game was going; players like Xavi and Deco highlighted the new type of playmaking midfielder (and also Andres Iniesta’s arrival in the second half changed the balance of the game in Barca’s favour)
    Deco had previously conquered Europe with Porto under Jose Mourinho in 2004,
    showing his brilliance in the ‘10’ role. He was a sign of things to come. The 2006 success pointed towards something special growing in Cataluña and with the burgeoning talent of Andrés Iniesta and the young, but brilliant, Lionel Messi it appeared that Barcelona were on the cusp of greatness. The core of Xavi, Iniesta and Messi became synonymous with Barca’s style as well and these players were seen as the modern playmakers. They possessed skill, poise, craft, vision, intelligence and they were all ‘small’.

    In this golden age for Spanish football, football was now facing a revolution in terms of style and type of player. At the 2008 Euros, Spain faced Germany in the final. Their 1-0 success proved that height, physicality and strength were no longer essential for success. The signs were showing that in the modern game dynamic technicians were needed.

    Spain’s coach in 2008, Luis Aragonés, saw that possession-based football was what Spain was built for and they would prosper from embracing it. He put his faith in Xavi Hernandez at the 2008 Euros - seeing in the midfielder the ability to lead and control games. Xavi’s growing influence and impact for Spain and Barcelona turned him into the best midfielder of his generation. His ability to control games was unprecedented. Aragonés and Guardiola had embraced his talent and brought out the best in him.

    Xavi’s midfield partner would be Andrés Iniesta, arguably the greatest playmaker of the 21st century. Barcelona and Spain would dominate games with his skill, poise, and control. As Alex Ferguson said, prior to the 2009 Champions League final, “I’m not obsessed with Messi, Iniesta is the danger. He’s fantastic. He makes the team work. The way he finds passes, his movement and his ability to create space is incredible. He’s so important for Barcelona.” Xavi and Iniesta, a perfect combination, technicians ideally suited to the contemporary game and its needs.
    In the modern world of football, with restricted space and time, the importance of players finding and exploiting space and possessing excellent technical ability, poise and intelligence was now fundamental. It wasn’t like the trequartista had died, only now it had evolved to something more, a player with more variety.

    The classic 10 remains – just
    While Barcelona were displaying the playmaker’s evolution, Jose Mourinho, ever the
    antithesis to Pep Guardiola, was seeking to prove that the classic trequartista could still ‘work’ in the modern game.

    In 2009, Jose Mourinho was at Inter Milan. He sought a playmaker who could excel in his formation. He found him in Wesley Sneijder, the Dutch playmaker who had endured a difficult time at Real Madrid. He was brought to Inter Milan to be a key man in Mourinho’s new project and Mourinho moulded the side around Sneijder, making players like Samuel Eto’o, Goran Pandev and Diego Milito do the defensive work from the front, allowing Sneijder to play a free role behind the striker.

    The 2009/2010 season would be a great success for both player and club. A record treble-winning season and a World Cup final marked a great 12 months for Sneijder. Nicknamed “the Sniper” for his playmaking ability to assist and his pinpoint set piece deliveries, Sneijder grew into his role as Inter’s trequartista. His performances were rewarded by UEFA and he was named as the best midfielder of the 2009/2010 season, and shortlisted for the 2010 Ballon D’Or. Lionel Messi took the accolade yet there is a strong case that Sneijder should have won it that year.

    Another playmaking 10 that Mourinho worked with was Mesut Özil, perhaps the most talented playmaker of his generation. After impressing for Germany’s U21 side at the 2009 U21 European Championships Özil then showcased his talent on the biggest stage - at the 2010 World Cup - taking Germany to a semi-final with some mesmerising displays. A move to a big club was imminent and it was Real Madrid who would come for him.

    The German playmaker excelled at Real Madrid under Mourinho and then moved to Arsenal in 2013. Özil would benefit from the tutelage of Jose Mourinho and with the attacking talents of Cristiano Ronaldo and Karim Benzema he would provide the highest number of assists in European football during his time at Madrid and prove to be one of the best playmakers in world football.

    However, there is a question mark over Sneijder and Özil. Yes they are fantastic players… but are they suitable to the modern game and what it requires of its players? Despite their track records there have been arguments that suggest Sneijder’s inflexibility in a modern world of fluid positions has made his role redundant. There is an argument that he lacks the flexibility of movement which the current game requires.

    If Sneijder had been playing during the late 90’s and early 2000’s it is conceivable that he could have been one of the greats. During the 90’s Sneijder would have been blessed with time and space which he could have exploited and prospered in, yet this space and time has disappeared or at least become minimised.

    It is important to note that whereas many regard Sneijder as an ‘attacking midfielder’ he is in fact more of a ‘second striker’, and this is where the problems of his suitability arise. Under Mourinho he was not instructed to track back and help his midfield when defending. His role was to wait for a counter attack and be in space to receive the ball. Other managers, since, have asked him to play deeper and support his midfield, to make a ‘three'. Like Özil, defending is not something he wishes to do.

    As great as these playmakers are when in possession, they do not give their side defensive balance or support when out of possession and against better sides, especially those who play with a three man midfield they fail to provide the team with the cover and support which is required. There is very little room in that midfield three for a luxury player. The modern required ‘complete’ midfielders.

    In the summer of 2012 it appeared that Mourinho had learnt his lesson regarding the ‘10’. Perhaps it was a lesson from the previous season’s failure in the Champions
    League semi-final against Bayern. Although the tie went to penalties, Madrid were abject in midfield. A midfield two of Sami Khedira and Xavi Alonso can outplay many sides, yet against a side possessing Schweinsteiger, Gustavo, and Toni Kroos, they were overloaded. Simply put Özil did not provide the defensive support required and Madrid were over-run.

    This semi-final exit appeared to be the reason that Luka Modric was signed. Modric is a very talented footballer and, as we saw in the previous chapter, a more complete player than Özil. His reliability in possession offers more support defensively. In 2013/2014 Modric - alongside Ángel Di María and Xabi Alonso - offered Madrid the ability to play a three man midfield and dominate games - one reason why they won the Champions League. What is evident is that the ‘complete’ midfielder has replaced the classic playmaker in the central areas. So is there a place for the playmaker in the modern game?

    The Özil situation was reflected in the case of Juan Mata in England. Ever since Juan Mata arrived in English football he has been a revelation. Chelsea’s player of the season for two years running highlighted how important he was for the club and the team. He helped them win the Champions League and Europa League too in that time. He became Chelsea’s ‘key’ man. Mata is a classic trequartista, a player who excels as the archetypal ‘10’. He drifts wide (often to the right) but enjoys the space between the opposition’s defence and midfield.

    However, with the return of Jose Mourinho at Chelsea Mata was not seen as a key part of the side. Instead, the Brazilian Oscar was the player given the ‘10’ role. Mourinho prefers Oscar because of what he offers defensively. Mourinho had determined what the modern game requires, and appears to no longer trust or see value in players who often neglect their defensive duties and fail to drop back to make a three man midfield. There are many similarities with Oscar and Modric and it is clear that Mourinho has gravitated towards a three man midfield rather than rely on a classic 10 in the ‘hole’.

    The modern playmaker
    In the summer of 2012 Dortmund would lose Shinji Kagawa to Manchester United,
    meaning their academy product Mario Götze would step into the central playmaker
    role. Dortmund looked to be more of a complete side with Götze in that role and
    would reach the Champions League final and face Bayern. Götze pointed towards a
    new type of playmaking midfielder.
    Unlike a classic trequartista like Mata, Özil, or Kagawa, Götze was much more
    dynamic. He roamed into wide areas, playing like a winger, or even a forward when
    required. He could drop deeper, overload the midfield and seek to link play. And he
    could be a playmaker in central areas when required. In an attacking sense he could
    do it all.
    And importantly - defensively - he could press, track, and support the team. As we
    saw earlier, the importance of the whole team participating in the defensive phase is
    fundamental and Götze offered Dortmund this more than Kagawa did.
    It was a huge loss for Dortmund to lose Götze, especially losing him to their rivals
    Bayern. The Munich club were able to take a world class player from their rivals as
    well as add a complete playmaker to play alongside another new modern playmaker
    in Thiago Alcantara. Guardiola was building a midfield filled with the new
    generation of complete, playmaking midfielders. A clear move to universality?

    In the summer of 2014 the World Cup pointed to the importance of this ‘type’ of
    playmaker. The standout player was James Rodriquez, the Colombian Number 10.
    Shining during his time at Porto, Rodriquez moved to Monaco in 2013 for
    €45 million. After his sensational performance in the World Cup where he scored
    six goals for his country, he became eagerly sought after, and it would be Real
    Madrid who would pay €75 million for him.

    Rodriquez is a modern forward; similar to Götze (who would score the winner in
    the World Cup final for Germany playing as a false nine). He is capable of playing in
    a multitude of positions across the forward line. Central, wide, and up front is not an
    issue for him, an asset which makes him extremely valuable in a game where
    versatility and movement is becoming more important.

    In players like Lionel Messi, David Silva, Santi Cazorla, Mario Götze and Eden Hazard we have the modern playmakers. These are ‘fluid’ players. As romantic as the position and player was, the truth is the classic trequartista has been left behind by football’s evolution, fixed and rigid has been replaced by fluidity. It is another step towards universality.

    As we can see, in the space of 15 years the ‘10’ has evolved significantly. The modern playmaker must be more than a creative attacking talent, he must be flexible and importantly willing to do his work when out of possession. Just as the fixed trequartista was replaced by the dynamic and athletic midfielder in the early 2000’s, so it appears the same trend has happened once more. The speed of this evolution highlights how quickly the game is changing. Evidence once more that football is forever in flux.

    Adios Riquelme
    As for Juan Roman Riquelme, he will remembered with great nostalgia, not only for what he did as a player, for how he graced the pitch and played with such creative genius it made watching football a genuine joy. But because he is one of the last of his kind. While the role may have evolved and not died, there is no doubt in my mind that the Riquelme type playmaker will not be seen at the top levels of the game again.
    The game has got quicker, space has become more restricted the needs of the modern game require not only physical speed and athleticism, as well as a mentality and willingness to defend, but also a move away from fixed positions and the embracing of fluid football.

    Riquelme characterises an era and a personality which isn't seen in the modern game. A retro footballer who played to the beat of his own drum and who played the game his way. This freedom of expression has been nullified somewhat by the ever growing micro-management of tactical systems and strategies. While technical skill, speed and creativity appears to be getting better and quicker, that sense of freedom on a pitch has been seemingly lost. This is why Riquelme’s retirement means so much to the game, it really is the end of a glorious era of a type of player we may never see again.

    Ray Hudson once said of Ronaldinho "Like Betamax, they don't make them like him anymore", personally I think that's a fitting tribute to Juan Roman Riquelme. Adios, it was a delight to watch you play.
    The Whitehouse Address @The_W_Address

    the source:
    http://whitehouseaddress.blogspot.my/2015/01/adios-riquelme-end-of-classic.html
     

    Attached Files:

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  6. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    [​IMG]another article about him:

    Riquelme’s reminder: There’ll always be a place for art in soccer

    [​IMG]
    by Miriti Murungi
    January 27, 2015 1:38 a.m.

    Call me old fashioned, but Juan Román Riquelme is my favorite kind of player. Riquelme was never the fastest, strongest, or even remotely close to the most athletic player on the field. But somehow, the Argentine midfielder made a career out of the remaining scraps, relying exclusively on technique, awareness, and an ability to read the game with such precision that at times he came off as a master puppeteer. The other 21 players on the field frequently looked like extensions of Riquelme, only there to be manipulated by his thoughts and movements. Riquelme created exquisite art.

    Last night, Riquelme announced his career as an artist was over. Eight weeks after his final appearances, the Argentine virtuoso announced his retirement. His work is done.


    The beautiful thing about great art is you can lose yourself in it. Its completeness prevents you from focusing on the various components that add up to the beauty — you just stare, or listen, or watch, and love and nod approvingly, because you don’t have to explain it. The beauty speaks for itself. Your only job is to appreciate and keep your words to a minimum so you don’t ruin the experience for others.

    As I’ve been thinking about Riquelme’s art, I’ve found myself comparing his art to another artist currently dominating the soccer art scene, Cristiano Ronaldo. In some respects, comparing Ronaldo and Riquelme is apples and oranges since they don’t play the same position. In fact, aside from their shared love of pouting, they are very different players in almost every respect. But in other ways, comparing the two makes it clear what’s respectively amazing about each of them.

    There’s something about unparalleled athleticism in soccer that can come across as impure. With Riquelme, every touch mattered. His physical attributes didn’t allow him to push the ball past a player and sprint past him, so every touch needed a purpose. Every movement was under that much more scrutiny because he didn’t have Ronaldo athleticism to help him escape from otherwise precarious situations. As much as we hear of the need for a Plan B when Plan A doesn’t seem to be working, Riquelme never had much of a Plan B to rely on, so he doubled-down on Plan A. He had to think himself out of situations, like movie heroes who always seem to escape after continuously getting backed into corners. For Riquelme, when Plan A worked, the heavens opened, making his escape that much sweeter. Even those who rooted against him would often find themselves applauding when the final credits rolled.

    Perhaps that why people who’ve watched the greats have found themselves fawning over Román after he announced his retirement from the game this weekend.

    But it wasn’t just Ray Hudson.

    Riquelme spent one year at Barcelona, leaving his beloved Boca Juniors for the first time to test himself on European playgrounds. While there, he was initially marginalized by Louis van Gaal, largely because he didn’t have time or space for artists who didn’t like to defend.
    [​IMG]
    “[Louis] Van Gaal told me I was the best in the world when we had possession,” Riquelme explained, “but that it was like playing with ten men when we didn’t. He said he wasn’t sure about signing me, but I learned a huge amount there.”

    A year after his arrival, Riquelme found himself at Villarreal. Yet despite his turbulent year in Barcelona, the Catalan club is taking part in saying goodbye to a legend. It says a lot that a player, who barely made an impression during one year at a club, is remembered on that club’s website upon retirement. But that’s Riquelme. Even those who really didn’t appreciate him, appreciate him, because good art is ultimately undeniable.

    Thank you for everything, Román.

    The source:
    http://fusion.net/story/91909/juan-roman-riqueleme-retirement/
     
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  7. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    same match but with a longer duration

     
  8. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    #158 el-torero, May 22, 2016
    Last edited: May 22, 2016
    riquelme's (25 y.o., villarreal) vs racing santander (2003 la liga; home)

     
  9. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    his top 10 canos / nutmeg in all time:

     
  10. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    i found another article about roman:

    Riquelme – We will always have our ROMANce
    by Hugo Carlos Chavez Barroso
    MARCH 24, 2015
    ARGENTINA, COLUMNS, GLOBAL FOOTBALL

    “The best player of Argentine football is Riquelme, the second best is Riquelme when tired, and the third best is Riquelme when injured.” -Horacio Pagani

    When you see a player like Diego Valeri with superb vision, when you see Pedro Morales change the pace of the game, when you see anyone play like a true number 10, even if it’s just for a moment, during any given match…I see Juan Roman Riquelme.

    Roman was special since the moment of his debut at La Bombonera, when he came on as a sub in the fall of 1996 for the legend himself, Diego Armando Maradona. After that there was no looking back, “Topo-Gigio” made the glorious Boca number 10 jersey his own.

    Some might say that he is a footballer from another time, a time when the sport wasn’t as athletic and running to defend wasn’t a demand for everyone on the pitch. Then there’s the ones that called him ‘Freezelme’ or Pecho Frio (reference in Spanish for him being cold) suggesting he doesn’t have the fire burning inside. Others see him as wasted talent, a player who will always carry the ‘what if’ or ‘what could have been’.

    Perhaps all these people didn’t see what I saw him doing. They didn’t see him command the popular club Boca Juniors through its golden age. They didn’t see him take a tiny nonexistent club in Europe to the Champions League semifinal.

    They didn’t see you uplift Argentina’s game on the mid 00’s. They missed that astonishing nutmeg to River’s Mario Yepes. They did not enjoy the bullfighter exhibition against Real Madrid in the Intercontinental Cup…they apparently were busy watching “footballers” being athletes and running on and on.

    But I’m certain that when the years go by, and suddenly they realize that they had the chance to enjoy the last #10, they will regret it and I’m not sure how they will face their grandchildren to tell them they weren’t delighted at the time.

    He once was quoted saying that “He didn’t play to make friends”. Jokes even came after he announced his retirement some weeks ago, claiming that his farewell game wasn’t going to happen because there was not enough players to complete the starting eleven of Riquelme’s friends team. He probably didn’t make many friends, but he surely made many followers – on and off the pitch. He made us fall in love with football over and over again.

    In Roman’s time, there was also a great #10, one that was more mainstream, more liked by the masses. His name is Zinedine Zidane. But while the “wise” men underrated Riquelme, Zidane humbled himself and asked the Argentine to trade jerseys with him after his last ever club game in professional football. In the eyes of the greats, Riquelme sits on the same table as them. In his last Real Madrid match, Zidane chose Riquelme to swap shirts.

    Not only do great contemporary players adore his playing style, there’s also the common class people who watch from the stands that recognize him as being bigger than God himself in what was once God’s only territory.

    Riquelme came, played his exquisite football, won them everything, and therefore the Boca fanatics were forever grateful. He was the chosen one, he really was.

    After Diego Maradona (once untouchable in Boca), had an argument with Riquelme which led to Roman ending his career, for the second and last time in the national team in 2009 and his chance of playing in South Africa 2010; Boca’s hinchas (fans) made it clear at la Bombonera with chants and banners who’s side they were on.

    Riquelme knew this. He knew he owns Boca’s divine jersey and La Bombonera’s veneration.

    “The 10 from Boca is mine. The day that a player from Boca wins more than three Libertadores, it will be his. And the day that a player plays more than 206 games at la Bombonera, it will be his playground, but for now it is the playground of my house,” Riquelme stated to ESPN Argentina after confirming his permanent retirement.

    Even those who were born to despise him, had to give up, and instead learned to respect him even when that meant they had to bear him rip the club in their heart apart. As journalist and River Plate fanatic Javier Garcia wrote in a letter addressed to Roman:

    “I impose myself not to like you. How was I to enjoy a player from Boca? Who can even think of it? I couldn’t ignore you either. You are too great for anyone that likes football to be indifferent to you. So then, I had to conform myself with the third option: I suffered you. I lived all your years at Boca with the sensation, the indescribable that the Xeneize victory was possible in any place, any circumstance or moment if The Ten was Juan Roman Riquelme.”

    Riquelme understood and read the game in such a way, that coaching wasn’t needed, what was needed was for them to do what Carlos Bianchi did: let him do whatever he wants. Coaches shouldn’t restrict talent, those who do, are taking actions equivalent to not letting Michelangelo paint.

    “With the ball (on his feet) he is the best, without it we play with 10 men”, once said Louis van Gaal about Riquelme regarding the time they were together in Barcelona.

    When he said that, it felt like football had died a little bit. It was also one of those times when I realized that some people are blind when beauty is right in front of them.

    We can easily enumerate his defects (real or not): his slow tempo, his nonfriendly attitude, his arrogance, his need of being the man to look for in the field…but if these is what it takes to win Copas Libertadores, see incredible goal-passes, witness his masterful strike, see the Yellow Submarine emerge to existence, win the Olympic gold, then, I don’t know about you, but in my team – Riquelme starts every match.

    It will never be the same to watch football, to watch Boca without him, especially for a generation that was deeply marked by his path in football from beginning to end. It might be a long time after we see another real #10, another playmaker of his characteristics…but until then, we will always have…Roman.

    http://www.prostamerika.com/2015/03/24/114508/114508
     
  11. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    maradona's wish:

    If I had money, I would ask Riquelme to return – Maradona

    Jul 20, 2016 19:28:09
    The 38-year-old playmaker may have retired at the start of last year, but his fellow Boca Juniors legend would love to see him on the pitch again

    Diego Maradona would love to see former Argentina international and Boca Juniors great Juan Roman Riquelme back at the club.

    Riquelme, 38, retired in January 2015 after 51 appearances for the national team and having starred for Boca, Barcelona and Villarreal throughout his career.

    However, Argentina great Maradona said Boca – eliminated in the Copa Libertadores semi-finals – should consider making a move for the talented attacking midfielder.

    "If I had money, I would ask Riquelme to return," Maradona said in an interview with Fox Sports.

    Riquelme was a four-time Argentine Footballer of the Year, while he won Olympic gold in 2008.

    He won numerous league titles with Boca, as well as three Copa Libertadores crowns.

    http://www.stadiumastro.com/en/article/2016/07/20/maradona-wants-riquelme-back-at-boca

    http://www.goal.com/en/news/585/arg...money-i-would-ask-riquelme-to-return-maradona
     
  12. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    BY FANTASISTA10 TALKING 10S
    MARCH 26, 2015
    RECITING RIQUELME
    Argentina number 10

    The enigmatic and enormously gifted Juan Roman Riquelme retired from football earlier this year, and whilst his on-field craft and guile will be missed by fans around the world, they’ll endure long in the memory.

    As well as leaving a vast array of unique skill and trickery to admire and attempt, the former Argentina, Boca Juniors and Villarreal star also left us with some wonderfully beautiful words ‘on the record’ to recall and recite.

    Here’s 10 (naturally) of the best…

    1) In 2009, on his unique contract with the club, which saw him play unpaid for 12 months:

    I love Boca. If I didn’t, I wouldn’t be working here for free. I’m the only idiot who works for free, so I don’t think anyone can come and lecture me about my responsibilities.

    2) On his relationship with his father:

    My father never thinks I play well! With him there’s always something wrong. Even if the press say I had a good game, he’ll come along and remind of all the passes I misplaced. He always has high expectations of me, but I think that’s good. It stops me resting on my laurels.

    3) On Colombian defender Mario Yepes, the victim of an outrageous Riquelme nutmeg when Boca Juniors met River Plate in the Copa Libertadores quarter-final in 2000:

    I’ve always said that Yepes comes out of that move better than I do. It’s a clásico, we’re 3-0 up and then I go and do that. Any other player would have booted me but he tracked me all the way to the corner and didn’t do anything. I think that’s more manly than pulling off a nutmeg in a game like that.

    4) In answer to why he discounts Sunday – a match-day – as a working day:

    I always say football is my job from Monday to Saturday. On Sundays I can’t call it a job because playing the match is the most lovely thing for a player.

    5) Speaking on his difficult Barcelona days when Louis van Gaal was his coach:

    Van Gaal told me I was the best in the world when we had the ball and when we didn’t it was like playing with a man less. He explained to me that he hadn’t been convinced about signing me, but I learnt a lot, his training sessions were marvellous.

    6) On former Boca Juniors coach Julio Falcioni, after leaving the club:

    I’m over 30 and I didn’t need a coach. There was nothing Falcioni could teach me. What was he going to show me? How to keep goal?

    7) In 2006, on his character on the pitch and confirming who he feels was ‘the greatest’ during that time:

    Everyone feels the game in their own different way. People say I never smile when I play but I’ve never seen [Zinedine] Zidane laugh, whether he’s winning or losing, and he’s the greatest there’s been for the last 10 years.

    8) Riquelme in an interview with FIFA.com on his admiration forthe way Andres Iniesta plays the game:

    The one who plays this game the best is Iniesta: he knows exactly when to go forward and when to drop back. He picks the right moment to do everything: when to dribble, when to speed things up and when to slow things down. And I think that’s the only thing that can’t be taught or bought. You can learn how to shoot and how to control the ball, but being aware of everything that’s happening out on the pitch – that’s something you’re either born with or you’re not.

    9) On his special relationship the ball:

    The ball has given me everything. Just like little girls love dolls, the best toy I’ve ever had, or could ever have, is a football. The person who invented it is a true hero: nobody can top that.

    10) Bidding a final farewell to Boca Juniors after their defeat to Corinthians in the Copa Libertadores 2012 final:

    I’m quitting now. I love this club, I love the fans and I’ll always be grateful because I am, and will always be, a Boca fan. I feel empty now though.

    the source:
    http://www.fantasista10.co.uk/reciting-riquelme/
     
  13. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    A journalist and River Plate fanatic Javier Garcia wrote in a letter addressed to Roman:

    For Roman;

    Relief. This is the first feeling I felt when I heard the news of your departure from Boca. I am a fanatic of River, like you you're in Boca. Your time of glory and triumph coincided with the stage of ostracism and forfeiture River. How do you that I am not relieved?

    Then we can talk about you as a football player. Do you know how many times I have dealt with you "pecho frio" (sissy, note)? Tristelme? Freezelme and other nicknames born footballing rivalry? Can you blame me? I do not believe.

    Yesterday you had said to the press and Mundo Boca "I was born and I will die bostero bostero". Well I was born gallina (chicken, derogatory nickname River) and I'll die gallina. I have in my DNA. I thought this was also the genetic heritage of not appreciate you. In reality, it is a consequence of my love for this shirt to red tape. You always, always played well against us, you were marking, was making decisive passes or pulled on free kicks. You and your "friends", Palermo and Guillermo. You three, you represent to me that that Boca won everything.

    But with you, Roman, something different happened. I insulted you up no end when you gave up to the national team because of your mom (fallen ill after insulting her son, ed.) You gave me an excuse to say, "You see, it's that big? How can you give up the national team! ". You did it a second time when the only player taller than you (Maradona) have criticized you on TV and you're gone again. I've still criticized. "How can you let go of the selection twice! ". I also made fun of you when you are hurting you all the time and when you asked for the change after 5 minutes during a Superclasico. That day, I cried like a freak from the stands of San Martin Monumental "This shit is over, Riquelme has crapped on it."

    What is good in football is that the wheel turns and we can accept mistakes. You leave Boca does not please me, but it comforts me. And though I have this feeling it's because, no doubt, you were great. If for fans of Boca, thy name is synonymous with greatness and success, for me it is synonymous with football martyr. I saw you score many goals, I've also seen leaving my conquered stage. I am self-imposed do not appreciate you. How could I, myself, enjoy a Boca idol? But I could not ignore you either. You're too big to go unnoticed for a person who loves football. So I had to content myself with the third option: I've cursed. I lived all your years to Boca with this indescribable feeling that xeneize victory was possible at any time, place, circumstance as long as the number 10 was Juan Roman Riquelme. It has often been the case. I am a journalist in addition to being for River. I do not commune with those who brought you to the rank of God. For me, no player deserves such treatment even if I was tempted to do with Ortega, Enzo (Francescoli, note) and even Trezeguet. But I understand those who do. Immediately, I ask myself, "What if you had played at River? ". I probably love you and I idolâtrerais you more than those who put you on a pedestal but I can not. I must not. I do not want.

    Have I lost a player with enormous characteristics River? Not at all. I saw you like that. I endured the same manner. And why not say it, I was fun watching you when you played in Villarreal, selection, or when you were making passes with Saviola that mark in Barcelona. Do you know how many times I mentioned that you missed penalty against Arsenal to prove that you were not perfect? Thousands of times. It should say that there are not many gray areas in your career. The truth is that he had to do to lead a non-existent team like Villarreal was far. I can tell you now that you no longer will play for Boca even if you will always one of them.

    I respect as rival Boca. I do not take pleasure in seeing them, I wear them even less to the skies. It's a neurosis. For me, Boca represents what is wrong, what is impure, what is unworthy, just the opposite of what I want me in the world of football. But with you, I had a dilemma. You have the genes of River Plate, Roman! Dribbling, elegance, touched. All this is to our school. There prevail garra, balls, win by any means, win Clasicos in one way or another. How best player of Argentine football the past ten years could he play in Boca? It was impossible. This guy was to represent River.
    You changed history. Despite Rojitas, Marcico, Mastrangelo and Maradona, it is you who has changed them a taste of the game. You have opened their eyes. Thou hast shown that football has taught me since I was little, that I received the legacy of my old gallina. How can they not love you! Thou hast showed a perfect world. If I were them, I would have liked you, too.

    But I'm not them. I do not love you, I do not love you but I respect you. Like you, you respect River. If there is someone who has pretty broad shoulders and the necessary grounds to criticize River, it's you. Neither the loudmouth Bermudez nor Maradona and his legend, or even Palermo. The guy who did the most to suffer River, it's you. You and your speed different play. You and this class, this style of play. And besides, I've never seen you speak ill of River. Anyway, not to the media or to the public. I always saw you speak well for my club, "River must go up," "the Superclasico miss" and lots of other sentences like. It's impossible for me not to respect you. And that you have won. And see for yourself, look how great you are, even they, with all the hate that we dedicate, have been able to criticize you when you spoke well of us. You were the greatest player in the history of Boca.

    Like Ortega, I like Francescoli. My father and my books have taught me to love Angel Labruna, they explained to me what it was that Maquina (the "machine" which was the nickname of the attack River in the 1940s, ed) and tell me why, Almeyda, for example, is not my idol. For you, I have not even a little affection. I do not allow myself. You're with them, you're bostero. You're against me. But you're a p ***** football player. You're one of the best this sport has ever seen and although I never liked you for the reasons listed above, I still had the chance to see you play on a lot with my own eyes as I had the chance to see Ortega, for example.

    Roman goodbye, thank God, you no longer playing the Boca. You'll never make me suffer. riquelme basMaintenant country, maybe I would take pleasure in seeing you on YouTube or during a discussion with bosteros friends. Before, I could not, you'll know why. In addition, we'll see each
    Once a white shirt with a red stripe meet a blue shirt with yellow horizontal band. After all, you were born and will die bostero and I was born and die gallina gallina. Anyway, today I took a leave of rivalry and I say: thank you for your football. We will always continue to be rivals because it is the beautiful game called football and the history that has so decided.

    Javier Garcia

    the source:
    http://www.lagrinta.fr/la-lettre-dun-fan-de-river-plate-riquelme&7245/
     
    leadleader repped this.
  14. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    his panenka style penalties compilation:

     
  15. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    Maradona: "I would have liked to be Riquelme"

    Diego Armando Maradona is loved by most Argentines by the magic that unfolded in the courts and for the love he showed to wear the shirt of the national team, with which won the last World Cup which currently holds the country: Mexico '86 .

    It is also considered by many as the best footballer in history. However, he seems to have a kind of account pending with what was his career. "Sometimes I start to think how lucky they had Riquelme had returned in full force to give Boca what gave. Riquelme is the type that performance gave Boca since he came back," said the former coach of combined South Africa national in 2010.

    "What Riquelme was great and I wish to be Riquelme. Imagine my best Napoli if I came to go to the Bombonera with the strength that Riquelme came, we had won much or more than Riquelme," said Diego in dialogue with Olé.

    Despite this, he took a break and also praised the actions of Carlos Tevez, concerning the current Xeneize. "A Carlitos I carry in my heart and I love him. He could have gone to Atletico Madrid, Bayern Munich or renew with Juventus, and yet chose Boca. That for bostero is priceless. So Carlitos is number one in the soul and heart of Boca ".

    He also took the opportunity to acknowledge their love for the greatest idol Independent: "It is true that going to see Bochini, I carried my brother the Colorado, but was nothing else in the Libertadores Cup, did not go on Sundays for me. Snoopy was the greatest. Bochini is right, but not touched the ball and rivals fell on his ass. that's what impressed me about him. "

    "To me had already asked Arsenal, Barcelona, Sivori I wanted to take Juventus. I had a quilombito the important head. So when they talk about Maradona, one must be Maradona. I like the gift, eh," he said former footballer, tomorrow will celebrate 40 years of his debut in First with the shirt of Argentinos, to refer to what is his life.

    Despite their constant bickering, Maradona was praise with O Rei "Pele could not say anything because he knew all nodded, kicking, stop with the back, chest, shoulders ....".

    the source:
    http://www.infobae.com/deportes-2/2016/10/19/maradona-me-hubiera-gustado-ser-riquelme/
     
  16. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    Bomb in Tucumán: Atletico wants Riquelme to play Copa Libertadores

    Apparently, Atlético wants to continue making history and continue to write golden pages in his football life. After getting into the Copa Libertadores, the Tucuman institution would be determined to bet heavily in the continental tournament and would go to the charge for Juan Román Riquelme! Yes: the Dean would make an attempt so that the idol of Boca put, once again, the shorts and the booties to professional level.

    This Monday began to circulate a version on the alleged interest of the Tucuman team to have the 10 for the next edition of the Copa Libertadores (the first in the history of the club of the North). And what began as a simple rumor or murmur (which exploded in social networks) gained some more force when the institution's second vice president, Ignacio Golobisky, referred to the issue leaving the door ajar to some future attempt. "I do not confirm or defer, but officially from Atletico Tucumán there is nothing for Riquelme," said the leader in dialogue with TN.

    As it transcendió, there would be a business group that would be part of the negotiation and that would try to convince to Roman so that the equipment of the Vasco Azconzábal is added.

    It should be noted that JR already announced his farewell party (retired from professional football) but without stipulating a specific date. Is it possible? Will Román put on the Dean or will it all end in a rumor?

    Veron already began to train to play the Cup with Students. Will he follow Roman?

    the source:

    http://zoomdeportivo.com/2016/11/07/riquelme-a-la-copa/

    http://www.diarioregistrado.com/dep...a-copa-libertadores_a5820fe0b0c297bac2b68a6bd
     
  17. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    revised video on his 25 goals in copa libertadores cup

     
  18. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    his cross, shot & goal through corner kick:



    the revised one:

     
    carlito86 repped this.
  19. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    TOO GOOD TO RUN
    Juan Roman Riquelme will always be one of the game’s great entertainers and the archetypal No10


    The Argentine No10 was a unique talent who overcame adversity to bless the game in ways that brought joy to thousands.

    In Argentina they demand more of their No10s.

    Not content with stylish passmasters, the public now expect otherworldly genius from such players.

    This is the country that produced Diego Maradona and Lionel Messi; players who rose to the top of the game and then broke through to explore uncharted territory.

    There is another Argentine No10 who did not win the same volume of trophies or global recognition, but was most certainly blessed with the same natural talent.

    This is the legend of Juan Roman Riquelme.

    Born the day before Argentina won the 1978 World Cup, Riquelme grew up in a shanty town in the Buenos Aires suburb of San Fernando, where violence and nefariousness are the local past-times.

    His dad was a violent gang leader and used to force Riquelme junior to play in matches arranged to satisfy the needs of illegal gambling rings.

    Many years later Argentina’s underworld caused him much distress as paid half a million dollars in ransom money to have his brother freed from kidnappers without harm.

    Humble beginnings meant Riquleme never let his celebrity status go to his head.

    Famous for remembering the names of club employees, journalists and everyone else he came across, Riquelme has always been Argentina’s man of the people, even if he did believe he should be South America’s top earner.

    A quote from a Buenos Aires taxi driver has long been attached to the cultured playmaker: “If there is one thing I respect about Roman, it is how he’s the only one in this country with the balls to tell that fat Maradona to f*ck off.”

    No player has ever personified Boca Juniors more.

    Riquelme’s passion, flair and dedication are all products of 14 years of service for the Argentine giants.

    While so many of the country’s star players spent the majority of their careers in Europe, Riquelme spent most of his time in his own back garden.

    For this reason, he is idolised above the likes of Messi in many circles.

    He did grace our green continent for a few seasons of course.

    Although he found himself unwanted and underused at Barcelona, a club that so easily could have made him the outright best player in the world had everything fallen into place.

    When Louis van Gaal refused to pick him in his favoured position at Barcelona, Riquelme demanded he be let go to prosper elsewhere.

    That’s when he put Villarreal on the map.

    Riquelme took them to a Champions League semi-final which they lost to Arsenal, thanks to the fact that he missed a last-minute penalty at El Madrigal.

    But the unwarranted blame was only temporary.

    Everyone at the club and beyond recognised the fact that without Riquelme’s relaxed brilliance, Villarreal would not have made it out the groups stages.

    His style attracted many admirers; Zinedine Zidane chose to swap shirts with Riquelme in the Frenchman’s final ever club game.

    But he also had his critics.

    Doubters lamented his work rate, or lack thereof.

    But what Riquelme knew is that if you possess the ability to see the game a second before anyone else, running is barely necessary.

    A playmaker in the purest sense he always had an insatiable eye for goal, dealing almost exclusively in Goal of the Season contenders.

    Argentina may have reached the final of the World Cup in 2014, but they played their most attractive football of the modern era in 2006, with Riquelme at the helm as creator-in-chief.

    Having starred in the group stages, Riquelme provided the assist for Roberto Ayala in the quarter-final against Germany.

    With Argentina 1-0 up and dominating possession, Riquelme was taken off as his energy levels drooped.

    Eight minutes later Miroslav Klose equalised and Germany would go on to do what they always have done, win on penalties.

    Politics, disagreements and the abduction of his brother meant he ended his career having played just 51 times for his country.

    In his second to last year with the national team (2007) he scored nine goals in as many games.

    His talent was worth a century of caps, at the very least.

    For his final act he returned to his first youth club, Argentinos Juniors, and inspired them to promotion back to the top flight.

    This act of repayment even won respect from River Plate fans, who are obligated to detest all Boca Juniors players from birth.

    Often mocked for his sulky appearance on the pitch, his creative displays brought smiles to thousands.

    Upon his retirement, prominent Argentine sportswriter, Horacio Pagani, described Riquelme as the ‘second inventor of football’, crediting us English as a whole as the first inventors a century or so previous.

    An expression of undying affection and hyperbole, certainly, but one worthy of one of football’s truly great entertainers.

    source:
    https://www.dreamteamfc.com/c/news-...lways-be-one-of-the-games-great-entertainers/
     
    Pipiolo repped this.
  20. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    Juan Román Riquelme, Mario Yepes and the greatest nutmeg ever

    Mario Yepes enjoyed a more than stellar career. The centre-back played 102 times for his country between 1999 and 2014, making him Colombia’s second-highest capped player of all time behind the enigmatic, frizzy haired legend Carlos Valderrama. Yepes also starred for hometown club Deportivo Cali, River Plate and San Lorenzo in Argentina, Nantes and Paris Saint-Germain in France, and Chievo, Milan and Atalanta in Italy’s Serie A.

    After hanging up his boots, he briefly went into management with former club Cali, lasting less than a year before he was fired for poor results and performances. Despite his longevity and success in the game, if you search “Mario Yepes River Plate” on YouTube, one of the first listings brings up a moment he would surely rather forget.

    Yepes’ River Plate were pitted against sworn enemies Boca Juniors in the 2000 Copa Libertadores quarter-finals. River were Argentina’s form team at the time, winning both championships either side of the tie with Boca, adding those two trophies to six other domestic triumphs in the 1990s. Boca were no slouches at the time either, having picked up two championship victories in recent years following a six-year drought. However, as the old cliche goes, form goes out of the window for cup games, and especially derby matches. This tie was to be no different.

    River had home advantage first, with Boca visiting El Monumental on 17 May 2000 for the opening leg. The hosts took the lead after just 15 minutes through Colombian striker Juan Pablo Ángel. The ball fell kindly to the future Aston Villa favourite after Boca goalkeeper Óscar Córdoba – another Colombian – misjudged a cross, and he lashed the ball home from eight yards.

    Fifteen minutes later Boca were awarded a free-kick on the right-hand corner of River’s box. Normally from this angle, you’d expect the ball to be aimed over the wall and into the near corner, to the goalkeeper’s right; Juan Román Riquelme, however, has always done things his own way and this was no exception. The magician whipped the ball towards the opposite side of the net, completely wrong-footing River goalkeeper Roberto Bonano. Javier Saviola restored River’s lead in the second half, after driving at the heart of the Boca defence before unleashing an unstoppable shot from more than 20 yards, and the game ended 2-1.

    One week later River visited La Bombonera looking to defend their slender lead from the first leg. With the away goal rule not in force, Boca knew one goal would be enough to take the game to extra time, providing they could keep a clean sheet at the other end. As in the first leg, the home side drew blood first with Marcelo Delgado breaking the deadlock for Boca on the hour to set up a tense final 30 minutes. Delgado scruffily converted a deep cross from Riquelme following a calamitous mix-up between Bonano and one of his defenders, reminiscent of the error that gave River the lead in the first leg.

    After 74 minutes, manager Carlos Bianchi would make an inspired substitution, withdrawing Gustavo Barros Schelotto – Boca’s current manager – with Sebastian Battaglia. Ten minutes later Riquelme released Battaglia, who was felled after bursting into the penalty box. Riquelme dispatched the resulting penalty with customary aplomb to give Boca the edge, 3-2 on aggregate. After playing a pivotal role in all three of Boca’s goals in the tie so far, Riquelme’s tail was up and two minutes after the penalty he produced a moment of magic that would become legendary.

    Right-sided midfielder Julio Marchant picked up the ball deep in his own half, clipping the ball into the feet of Riquelme who was loitering close to the touchline just inside River territory. Vastly out of position, central defender Yepes approached Riquelme like a moth drawn to a flame.

    Just as he could feel the touch of the Colombian on his back, Riquelme ran his right foot over the top of the ball, before flicking it backwards through the legs of the bemused Yepes. Yepes was the raging bull, and like all good matadors, Riquelme waited until the last possible minute before raising the red flag and outfoxing his nemesis.

    Riquelme then span off to his left and collected the ball on the other side. He jumped through the challenge of two further markers before rubbing salt in the wounds by evading a further tackle, playing with more than four River defenders at the same time.

    The ball was finally run out of play towards River’s corner flag, and even though it technically came to nothing, the psychological damage was done. It signified that the tie was over and that Boca, and Riquelme in particular, were able to play with their opponents like a rag doll. Riquelme later said that throughout his career the ball was like a toy to him, and he certainly played with Yepes that day.

    The cherry on the icing on the cake was provided by Boca’s all-time leading goalscorer, Martín Palermo. El Titan was returning following a long injury layoff – 193 days to be exact – that had scuppered a move to Italian giants Lazio. His introduction from the bench in the 77th minute – when the tie was still in the balance – was meant to have a detrimental psychological effect on River Plate, and it certainly worked.

    In the 90th minute, Palermo made it 3-0 to Boca after further good work from Riquelme and Battaglia. Palermo turned beautifully on the ball inside River’s box, wrong-footing the defence before neatly slotting the ball into the bottom corner with his left foot.

    Boca would go on to win the competition that year, eliminating Mexico’s Club América in the semi-finals and beating Palmeiras of Brazil on penalties in the final. Bianchi’s reign, under current president of the nation and former Boca president, Mauricio Macri, still marks the most successful period in the club’s history.

    With El Virrey in the dugout, Boca won four national championships and three Copa Libertadores. Those continental triumphs even gave Boca the chance to compete with Europe’s finest for the Intercontinental Cup. Against the odds, Boca defeated Real Madrid and AC Milan – in 2000 and 2003 respectively – to add to their already burgeoning trophy cabinet and cement their legendary status. The Intercontinental Cup – now called the Club World Cup – is often given more credence in South America than in Europe, where it is seen as somewhat of a distraction in the calendar. On both occasions, Boca’s players returned home heroes.

    River would bounce back from this defeat to Boca, winning five national championships over the course of the next decade, before an improbable relegation in 2011.

    Riquelme is now known to football fans the world over, but at the time of the nutmeg he was 22-year-old yet to make his mark on the world, despite six international caps and a handful of domestic titles to his name. In 2002 Riquelme would follow in the footsteps of his idol-turned-nemesis Diego Maradona by signing for Barcelona, although as with Maradona, his time at the Camp Nou would be fairly fleeting.

    Riquelme predictably fell foul of the rigid Dutch pragmatist Louis van Gaal and was sent to Villarreal on an initial two-year loan before spending a further two years with the Yellow Submarine following a permanent transfer. It was with at El Madrigal, under former Manchester City manager Mauricio Pellegrini, that Riquelme made his name, operating at the heart of a stunning team, matching Europe’s heavyweights with a minute budget in comparison.

    Riquelme would return to Boca in 2007 and spend another seven years at La Bombonera, adding two more league titles and a further Copa Libertadores to his medal cabinet. He finished his career with a season in the second tier at Argentinos Juniors, where he started his career in the youth team.

    Riquelme is one of his generation’s most gifted and revered players, and it was moments like the Yepes nutmeg – not to mention the numerous team and individual awards that he collected – that solidified his legend.

    The nutmeg is one of football’s most loved tricks, able to draw cheers from a crowd and anger from the recipient in equal measure. The origin of the English term is debated. In his 1998 book Over the Moon, Brian author Alex Leith explored how a lexicon of phrases found their way onto the tongues of British football fans. Leith claims that the ‘nut’ part of the word refers to the slang word for testicles, and that nutmeg is a variation on this. It’s also been claimed that the ‘meg’ part comes from cockney rhyming slang for leg.

    Another theory is that nutmeg is a rare spice, or perhaps was when the phrase was coined, and that the move is a rare one on the football field. None of these can be verified, which only adds to the intrigue and mystique of the word.

    In other languages, the phrase tunnel is used, which is a lot more sensible and easily understood. In Spanish, Riquelme’s mother tongue, the phrase caño is used. This word means tube or pipe, a variation on the tunnel theme, and generally relates to water. Geographically, water is able to force its path wherever it pleases, forging through whatever stands in its way. In nutmegging Yepes, Riquelme took the shortest path beyond his opponent, forcing the ball through an unwanted area, like a body of water, leaving a legacy that would last a lifetime.

    Tricks, perhaps in South America more than anywhere, are a hugely important part of the game. Contrary to the old-fashioned English characteristic of hard work, honesty and winning like gentlemen – although it must be said this is less prevalent now due to the globalisation of the English game – South Americans are typically willing to win by all means necessary. Tricking your opponent, and even the referee, is seen as a positive attribute and a perfectly acceptable way to win a football match. In the 1986 World Cup, Diego Maradona talked of “pickpocketing“ the English when he blatantly scored past Peter Shilton with his fist.

    In a football match, certain moments cause fans to stand en masse, creating the rat-a-tat-tat sound of plastic seats closing, or to surge forward in standing areas like a tidal wave. Goals, penalty saves and crunching tackles are capable of producing such moments during the course of a 90 minute match. For the flair players, there is no end of tricks that can have this very same effect on the fans, wowing them and embarrassing their opponents in one fell swoop. In May 2000 Riquelme did just that to Mario Yepes, and 17 years later it is still talked about as if it happened yesterday.

    It wasn’t the first or last time that Riquelme would embarrass an opponent, but given the magnitude of the occasion and the fierce rivalry with River Plate, it has to be considered one of the greatest – perhaps the greatest outright – nutmegs of all time. In typical Riquelme fashion, he played down the incident and was full of praise for his victim: “Whenever I’m asked about this trick, I always say it has more worth for Yepes than me. In a 3-0 Clásico with a trick such as this, I believe that any other player would have kicked out. Yet he followed me all the way to the corner without doing a thing. This is much more manly than nutmegging someone.”

    Riquelme’s words are proof that even when it comes to tricks, there is still a code amongst old school figures such as the Argentine and Yepes.

    source:
    http://thesefootballtimes.co/2017/0...lme-mario-yepes-and-the-greatest-nutmeg-ever/
     
  21. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    someone's reaction to roman's video



    i love his reaction
     
  22. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    riquelme's (24 y.o., boca juniors) vs indepediente (2002 Primera Division)

    only match highlights but still awesome considering that he had 2 goals & 2 assists

     
  23. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    "Generation Riquelme": Sub-15 Cup has youngsters inspired by the Roman

    Tournament promoted by Zico has five boys named after the former shirt 10 Boca Juniors, entitled to distinctive spellings and rivalry.

    At 15, Juan Román Riquelme was just another boy seeking the dream of becoming a footballer. In the Argentino Juniors' base categories, the midfielder did not imagine that, 24 years later, he was already an idol and multi-champion for Boca Juniors, he would become an inspiration for young Brazilians who, coincidentally or otherwise, decided to follow the same path as the former player.

    Last Saturday, Grêmio won Flamengo and took the title of the 20th edition of the Friendship Cup - the U15 tournament promoted by Zico in Rio de Janeiro. Joined in the competition, five boys with names inspired by Riquelme. Each one with its spelling and history, but all with the choices of the parents influenced by the Argentine half.

    GET TO KNOW THE BRAZILIAN "RIQUELMES"

    1 - THE EMANOEL THAT TURNED RIQUELME
    Name: Riquelme de Carvalho Araújo Viana
    Date of Birth: 8/28/2002 (15 years)
    Place of Birth: Barra Mansa-RJ

    Left-back of the sub-15 of Vasco and with calls for the Brazilian selection of the category, Riquelme carries in the name the idolatry of the father by the Argentine. The decision came after one of Juan Román's prominent appearances at Libertadores, Boca Juniors, even with his mother's will for "Emanoel."

    "My father told me that he decided to put my name on it because he was a Riquelme fan. He put it in my head that my name would be this after a Copa Libertadores final. My mother was not very supportive, I wanted my name to be Emanoel, but eventually she accepted and my father registered me as Riquelme.

    At the registry, the registry confused. By a mistake of letter, Riquelme was almost not born Rikelme. But will prevailed. Starting the career as a player, the boy has the stocking as an idol.

    - I've seen videos. He was a great player, a different guy, who knew the right moment to make each move. He was an ace. Even in history, although not in my position, I have it as an idol.

    2 - RIQUELME NO! RIQUELMO YES!
    Name: Riquelmo Alves Lima
    Club: Cruzeiro
    Date of Birth: 3/19/2002 (15 years)
    Place of Birth: Belo Horizonte

    Riquelme almost caused discord in Minas Gerais. The father, fan of the Argentinian, wanted the same name on the birth certificate. But the mother preferred something a little different. For the child's sake, the middle ground was made: Riquelmo!

    "My father was a Riquelme fan, I liked his football and put his name on me. My mother wanted it to be a bit different, so she preferred it to be Riquelmo and not Riquelme. But it was my father who spoke of choosing the name for me.

    At age 15, the memories of the classic Argentine half comes from the videos. The position of the young Cruze is the same as the player who started at the base of Argentino Juniors.

    I looked for some videos of him. Riquelme played a lot, played easy. He was very smart, he hit the ball well. I really liked his football. I am also half and I am working hard to, God willing, get on his level.

    3 - RIQUELMY BY HOMAGE (AND RIVALITY)
    Name: Riquelmy Oliveira Fernandes
    Club: Atlético-MG
    Date of Birth: 12/01/2002 (15 years)
    Place of Birth: São Paulo

    The duels between Boca Juniors and Palmeiras interfered directly in the life of a young man from São Paulo. After title in 2000 and vague in the decision in 2001 for the Argentineans, with great performance of Riquelme, a Corintian father decided to give to the son the name of the half.

    - They chose my name when Riquelme ended Palmeiras in the Libertadores (laughs). My father is a Corinthian, so it's explained (laughs). I've seen several of his videos already. I even had the opportunity to see him playing against Corinthians. I started to like him more when I saw him play, I still managed to get some of him in football.

    Riquelmy plays with the name, but admits that it is not Juan Román the great reference in the soccer. The idols are Brazilian.

    "I'm a Corinthian, too, but now I'm also Atlético-MG. Riquelme is not my idol, I like Neymar and Ronaldo Phenomenon.

    4 - BY THE IDOL, BUT WITH "Y", "K" AND "O"
    Name: Rykelmo de Souza Viana
    Club: Flamengo
    Date of Birth: 26/02/2002 (15 years)
    Place of Birth: Limeira-SP

    Shirt 5, fan of Zidane, but with a name inspired by 10 of Boca. Again the reason is the father, admirer of the football played in Argentina. The father's idolatry gave his son a name, with "y", "k" and "o", but in honor of Juan Román.

    - It's because of my father. He was very fond of Argentine football and admired the player a lot, so this tribute came to him. I watched his videos playing, I admire him a lot. I have him as an idol, not only by name, but also by football.

    Rykelmo was a Flamengo starter in the Friendship Cup. The team's campaign was worthy of applause, entitled to victory against Fluminense in the semifinal and balanced match with Grêmio in the decision.

    5 - RIQUELME (WITH Y) FOR INSISTENCE
    Name: Riquelmy Mendes Araújo
    Club: Cruzeiro
    Date of Birth: 11/04/2002 (15 years)
    Place of Birth: Gurupi-TO

    A midfielder who became an attacker, but did not forget the inspiration of the original Riquelme to continue growing in football. Riquelmy - who did not enter the field in the Friendship Cup because of an injury - has the former Boca Juniors player as a reference, especially in the way of hitting the ball.

    - I saw several videos of Riquelme on the internet. I saw that he was a different player, he played a lot in his day. I'm very inspired by it. It inspired me even more when I still acted as a midfield. I kept seeing videos of him hitting the ball, beating. That still interests me a lot, because I'm a center forward now.

    One more father left the office proud. The name, even with slight difference, was fruit of the insistence with the mother, who gave in the end. Good for the boy, who liked the homage.

    "My father was very fond of Riquelme's football. My mother did not want to. He thought of names other than "player's name." My father insisted, and my mother accepted. I really like my name.

    source:
    http://globoesporte.globo.com/rj/fu...ovens-inspirados-no-meia-veja-historias.ghtml
     
  24. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    riquelme (28 y.o., argentina) vs croatia (2006 friendly)

    fun facts:
    pekerman had subbed riquelme 3 times in 3 matches within year 2005 - 2006.

    1. vs england in 2005 friendly when argentina led by 2-1, end up lose 2-3.

    2. vs croatia in 2006 friendly when argentina led by 2-1, end up lose 2-3.

    3. vs germany in 2006 wc quarterfinal when argentina led by 1-0, end up draw 1-1 & lose in penalty kick.

    conclusion, pekerman learn nothing on it...... :lol:

     

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