R. I. P. -- The Authors Thread

Discussion in 'Books' started by Val1, May 8, 2012.

  1. Val1

    Val1 Member+

    Arsenal
    Mar 12, 2004
    MD's Eastern Shore
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    [​IMG]

    Maurice Sendak - 83.
    http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/47335950/ns/today-books/#.T6kWdVL-Uxo

    I know many, many who loved Sendak. I never did as a kid, but looking back at him as a parent who read a lot of crappy bedtime books to my kids, I realize how great this book is. Truly outsize, my kids came alive when we read this one. My son still has this entire book memorized.
     
    Dr. Wankler repped this.
  2. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    On this day in 2001, Hitch-hiker's Guide author Douglass Adams died.
     
  3. usscouse

    usscouse BigSoccer Supporter

    May 3, 2002
    Orygun coast
    April 11, 2007. Kurt Vonnegut jnr. The guy who kept me going in the 60' & 70's.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Nacional Tijuana

    Nacional Tijuana BigSoccer Supporter

    May 6, 2003
    San Diego, Calif.
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Ray Bradbury just died.
     
  5. Val1

    Val1 Member+

    Arsenal
    Mar 12, 2004
    MD's Eastern Shore
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    From Bradbury's official site (http://www.raybradbury.com/):
    Here's an interview with Bradbury (annoying chopped into short segments...)
    http://www.raybradbury.com/at_home_clips.html
     
  6. usscouse

    usscouse BigSoccer Supporter

    May 3, 2002
    Orygun coast
    I liked Ray a lot. He was the introduction for a lot of people into the world of Scifi.
    "Something Wicked This Way Comes"

    RIP Ray.
     
  7. Val1

    Val1 Member+

    Arsenal
    Mar 12, 2004
    MD's Eastern Shore
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    This kind of sucks, esp in that I missed it, but Jean Craighead George, author of My Side of the Mountain, Julie of the Wolves and over 80 other children's works, passed away three weeks ago.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/enter...s-dies-at-92/2012/05/21/gIQAK67hgU_story.html

    I never wanted to run away, I had a happy enough home life as a child, but after reading My Side of the Mountain, I certainly gave it some thought. Apparently, George had some trouble finding a publisher for the book because the book was so detailed that publishers thought that it would serve as a blueprint for others looking to run away....
     
  8. riverplate

    riverplate Member+

    Jan 1, 2003
    Corona, Queens
    Club:
    CA River Plate
    RIP

    [​IMG]

    Donald J. Sobol, Creator of Encyclopedia Brown, Dies at 87 - N.Y. Times

     
  9. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    Gore Vidal Dies at 86

    His memoir, Palimpsest, and his essays are well worth reading. I never made it through any of his historical novels like Burr or Lincoln, but his first novel, The City and the Pillar holds its own with any novel about WWII, and it was also one of the first American novels to openly address gay themes. And his made-for-TV political drama The Best Man is well worth watching, in the unlikely event you can track it down on DVD.
     
    riverplate repped this.
  10. malby

    malby Member+

    Liverpool FC
    Republic of Ireland
    May 11, 2004
    Rep of Ireland
    Club:
    Drogheda United
    Nat'l Team:
    Ireland Republic
    Maeve Binchey RIP
     
  11. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    I missed this one: Historian John Keegan, author of The Face of Battle and Many Other Books, died

    The Face of Battle is a landmark study of three battles, Agincourt, Waterloo, and the Somme, told not just from the perspective of the generals and the strategists, but as much as possible from the men who did the fighting. He also wrote on the American Civil War, the invasion of Normandy, and in 2004, the Iraq war. Haven't read those, but The Face of Battle is really good.

    He has his flaws, and the linked NYT obit pretty much hits all of them. But he wrote really readable history, which is always admirable.
     
  12. Val1

    Val1 Member+

    Arsenal
    Mar 12, 2004
    MD's Eastern Shore
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    A History of Warfare is as good as they come.​
    He will be missed....​
     
  13. song219

    song219 BigSoccer Supporter

    Apr 5, 2004
    La Norte
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    Vanuatu
    Years ago I took a college course based on this book & that was how I was introduced to Keegan. A History of Warfare is superior also.
     
  14. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    Damn. Another one snuck by me. Last monday, journalist, art critic, historian, and Aussie Robert Hughes died.

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articl...e-critic-and-powerful-voice-now-silenced.html

    His books on art (a couple of them based on excellent PBS series) were fantastic, as were his books about Australia, Barcelona, and Rome. Damn fine memoir in there, too. And unmentioned on the "best book" link in the article is The Culture of Complaint, a bipartisan critique of the whininess that has become endemic in American cultural and political discourse.

    From the article:

    Ten years earlier, reviewing a well-meaning Goya show in Boston that attempted to turn the master into an exemplary liberal, Hughes gently demurred, arguing correctly that the painter was as much pulled by the demons of the pueblo as committed to exorcising them in the name of a Spanish Enlightenment.

    He ended the piece with a statement of the kind of bleak truth he always refused to duck. “The liberal message was that . . . Man is born free but is everywhere in chains. Goya’s message late in life is different. The chains are attached to something deep inside human nature: they are forged from the substance of what, since Freud, we have called the id. They are not the “mind-forged manacles” of which William Blake wrote: they are not a social artifact that can be legislated away or struck off by the liberating intellect, they are what we are. In the end there is only the violated emptiness of acceptance of our fallen nature; the pining of the philosophical dog whose master is as absent from him as God is from Goya.”


     
  15. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    Chinua Achebe, author of Things Fall Apart and many other novels, dies at 82


    If things had worked out a little differently, Albert Chinualumogu Achebe’s first book could have been lost to history. A London typing service “dismissed the handwritten manuscript—sent from Africa—as a joke,” notes the Wall Street Journal. Little did they know it was the book that would be seen as the foundation stone for African literature. When it was finally published in 1958, the book became a huge hit, propelling the Nigerian author to an unlikely fame and going on to selling 10 million copies in 50 languages.

    "It literally invented African literature," says Simon Gikandi, Kenyan author of Reading Chinua Achebe. The 82-year-old Nigerian, who had been living in the United States since a 1990 car accident left him paralyzed from the waist down, died Friday morning following a brief illness, his agent told the Associated Press.​

     
    Auriaprottu repped this.
  16. G-boot

    G-boot Member

    Manchester United
    Nov 6, 2004
    Club:
    Manchester United FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Salinger's manuscripts, where are you?
     
  17. The Biscuitman

    The Biscuitman Member+

    Jul 4, 2007
    Club:
    Reading FC
    Iain Banks announces he has terminal cancer and a few months to live.

    Says his people are trying to get his last book finished and out before he goes
     
  18. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    SF Pulp Master Jack Vance Dies at 96

    In 2009, a profile in the New York Times Magazine described Vance as "one of American literature's most distinctive and undervalued voices," according to the website.

    Vance collected a number of awards over the years, including Hugo Awards for The Dragon Masters in 1963, The Last Castle in 1967, and for his memoir This is Me, Jack Vance! in 2010.
     
  19. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    Crime Writer (and former western author) Elmore Leonard dies at 87


    Leonard was said to be in the middle of his 46th novel when he was admitted to the hospital. This past November he was awarded the Medal for Distinguished Contribution from the National Book Foundation. He began publishing novels and short stories in the early 1950s and kept at it until the end. His most well-known works of fiction were probably: Get Shorty, which was turned later turned into a film with the same name starring John Travolta and Danny DeVito; Rum Punch, which became the basis for Quentin Tarantino's Jackie Brown; and Out of Sight, which would become a Steven Soderbergh movie starring George Clooney.

     
  20. Minnman

    Minnman Member+

    Feb 11, 2000
    Columbus, OH, USA
    Club:
    Columbus Crew
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Seamus Heaney. Damn. What a huge loss this is.
     
  21. Dr. Wankler

    Dr. Wankler Member+

    May 2, 2001
    The Electric City
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    Not my favorite contemporary poet, but his bog people poems, and his translations of Beowulf and the lesser known (and shorter) Testament of Cresseid are monumental, IMO.
     
  22. Val1

    Val1 Member+

    Arsenal
    Mar 12, 2004
    MD's Eastern Shore
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Yep, best translation of Beowulf that I've read.
     
  23. Caddman

    Caddman Member+

    Aug 18, 1999
    Houston, Texas
    Club:
    Houston Dynamo
    Nat'l Team:
    United States

Share This Page