Possession Soccer/Positional Play Thread

Discussion in 'Coach' started by elessar78, Nov 13, 2015.

  1. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Fatigue is something that never really enters the player development discussion. With unlimited subs you never have to think of how to Marshall your resources. Players don’t know how to manage tempo.
     
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  2. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Ran this positional game yesterday. It's a great, little exercise when you are playing 7v7

     
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  3. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    I think it excellent for teams playing 11v11 too. It is a simple progression from the garden variety rondo.

    What it lacks is direction. So the next step would be to add scoring targets, goals or zones. Or play 5v4. Or just scrimmage with even sides.

    I would try a variation on the scoring. 1 point for still maintaining possession after 10 passes and 2 points if the 10th pass is received in a small scoring zone (the breakout pass). Smaller side gets 1 point per goal.
     
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  4. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    Couldn't resist. Noticed this clip after the above one. Worth watching someone that loves to play.
     
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  5. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    we progress to scoring on the goals on eother end. After 5 passes, attacking team can try to score.If defenders win it they can go directly to goal. Forces attacker to get into the immediate recovery mindset.
     
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  6. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    oh man. one of my faves. I actually still where his Nike R10 tiempos. Ive had several pairs since I bought those ten years ago but those are still the best
     
  7. Malabranca

    Malabranca New Member

    Oct 6, 2016
    I really like this drill and use it to focus on transitions. That being said, I have noticed I have a tendency to focus on the offensive aspects and would note that there should be just as much emphasis on the three defenders and their shape as well. This is a perfect opportunity to teach proper defensive skills as well. Way too many passes in the example video split the defenders for me to be happy. ;)
     
  8. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Agree with all of the above. It's actually on my list to do a team pressing topic using this rondo—my girls, when possession is lost, still stand there. One may pressure, but not all and not fully committed to it.
     
  9. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator
    Staff Member

    May 12, 2010
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    I read something about Pep yesterday, never wanted the ball to a winger to come from the same side full back (2 passes to 7, for example). Because, he said, the defenders are already on that side and you don't change their (defenders') angle. Ideally it would get played to CMs, then back out to the wing (2 > 8 > 7, for example).

    When you teach building out to young players, what's your "pattern"? I've been teaching ( to 7v7) it as GK > RCB > RW. Because it keeps it out of middle. But should it be GK > RCB > CM > RW/LW. That CM really playing as a true pivot point for the team.
     
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  10. pu.ma

    pu.ma Member

    Feb 8, 2018
    Why not do both patterns? I was just thinking of trying it with my team because I was watching my older kid's practice yesterday and they were doing passing patterns for attacking. During the course of the practice, the build up looked about the same but finishing was being changed up.
     
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  11. stphnsn

    stphnsn Member+

    Jan 30, 2009
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    We play a 1323. If my 3 has the ball, I instruct my 11 to be a wide option and an 8 to be a central option. 3 can play to either based on what the pressure allows.

    At my course in August, my instructor broke down the field into left, center, and right channels like a lot of us do. She took it a step further and added half-spaces between left and center and center and right. She said their philosophy was to have each line of players alternate the spacing between the three channels and the half spaces to help provide better angles. If your 3 is in the far left channel and your 5 is in the central channel, your 8 would be in the left/center half space. Then the 11 would be in the far left up above. I thought that was an interesting way to think about it.
     
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  12. NewDadaCoach

    NewDadaCoach Member

    Tottenham Hotspur
    United States
    Sep 28, 2019
    I think it is best to go through a midfielder if possible for shorter/quicker passes. A long ball from back to winger will give a defender ample time to respond and intercept the pass. I think what Pep said makes sense. But, if a back must ping then go to the opposite side. RB to LW, for ex, the LW will likely have more space and time to bring ball under control.
     
  13. rca2

    rca2 Member+

    Nov 25, 2005
    This is a very old concept of Dutch and Brazilian tactics--the preference for the diagonal pass. It may also be a universal concept of good soccer, but I recall it being emphasized by Dutch and Brazilian materials I read in the 1970s and 80s. Most definitely it wasn't a feature of English thought at that time. (I say English rather than British intentionally.)

    A couple more points to think about. The classic 433 has 3 CMs. No wide midfielders. A vertical pass makes first touch more difficult. When the winger is closely marked, the pass will be behind the winger, who will turn around and be playing with his back to goal, making it very difficult for the winger to do anything effective with the ball.

    The last point may not be a problem in the final third, because it has drawn markers outside. When trying to break out of the back, however, it is a big problem.
     
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  14. stphnsn

    stphnsn Member+

    Jan 30, 2009
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Something else I picked up in August was "Straight run - diagonal pass. Diagonal run - straight pass." You very rarely want to have a straight run with a straight pass because it's such a tight angle. Maybe that's something intuitive, but hearing someone say it out loud flicked a switch for me.
     
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