Making Dutch academies EPL raid proof

Discussion in 'The Netherlands' started by feyenoordsoccerfan, Apr 29, 2016.

  1. Cory Gibbs.
    Just look at the EPL raiding our 15 years old (Bruma, Ecebilio Ake etc) and turning them into nothing.
    Brexit cannot come fast enough. At least then we can let the talents go through the whole cycle up to the first team age.
     
  2. Orange14

    Orange14 Moderator
    Staff Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    Bethesda, MD
    Club:
    AFC Ajax
    Nat'l Team:
    Netherlands
    No, Pope originally played with DC United when Arena was the trainer. Just did a Google search; it was Cory Gibbs. He had 15 starts for Feyenoord and then injured his knee while on playing for the US NT. Was never the same player after that. Feyenoord loaned him to ADO and then he left the Netherlands.
     
  3. Yup, was such a waste. My dad really liked him as a player. I still wonder where he might have ended up, if his career wasnot messed up by that injury.
     
  4. Orange14

    Orange14 Moderator
    Staff Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    Bethesda, MD
    Club:
    AFC Ajax
    Nat'l Team:
    Netherlands
    Gibbs was really talented. He moved to the Bundesliga with FC St. Pauli after college and was quite good there. Unfortunately the team was relegated twice while he was a player and he left. Had one season in the US before signing for Feyenoord.
     
  5. Teak

    Teak Member

    Feyenoord, OKC Energy FC, Real Salt Lake, FC Risa
    Nov 22, 2008
    Grain Belt
    Club:
    Feyenoord
    Great article. Thanks for the link!

    The main difference between futbol and the American version (gridiron football) is encapsulated in the different words used: trainer versus coach. A futbol trainer trains the squad and then mostly sits on the sidelines during the match and watches the players make onfield decisions. In gridiron, the coach is pacing the sidelines, yelling, and listening in to a spotter who sits high in the stadium. They do the decision-making for the quarterback, calling plays and shuttling players in and out. Same with basketball. Celebrity coaches pace the sidelines, often stepping on the court, actively directing the team. When this mentality is transfered to futbol (soccer), you get players who cannot think or make decisions; thus, a lack of creativity.

    Although South America tends to produce divers, it also produces creative players who think quickly and make inventive moves. I don't know if you have seen Miguel Almiron play yet, but he is the epitome of this creativity at this time. Pele, Ronaldo, Ronaldinho, Messi, Maradona, Aimar, Riquelme, Morales, Valeri, etc. all embodied this creativity. I love seeing South Americans in MLS because I would rather see our futbol going the creative route rather than the over-coached route.
     
  6. The way his signing went was a brilliant story.
     
  7. Yeah! Many times I read in the USA threads the "complaint" that if the top athletes would choose soccer instead of i.e. American football, the USA would be a top soccer nation. I countered that with the remark that from what I saw American sports like football havenot got what is required for being successful in soccer, creative thinking. I pointed to the fact that the coach on the line was making all the decisions and the players were mere puppets, doing exactly what the coach orders.
     
  8. Would he be Feyenoord material?
     
  9. Orange14

    Orange14 Moderator
    Staff Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    Bethesda, MD
    Club:
    AFC Ajax
    Nat'l Team:
    Netherlands
    Exactly right. Soccer/football forces players to think and make decisions very quickly. Play does not top often in contrast to American football where there is much less action than stoppage. At the professional level, quarterbacks no longer call the plays, it's all relayed in from the sidelines. Same for defense. About ten years ago I grew bored with American football and have seldom watched a game since then. I find soccer/football far more intricate and absorbing to watch. I only wish we had a youth program when I was growing up. I was born about fifteen years to early for the beginning of the US soccer boom.
     
  10. #61 feyenoordsoccerfan, Jul 10, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2017
    Isnot it time the KNVB as a neutral party issues a leaflet for talented Youth Academy players and their parents with a warning about the way EPL clubs operate with snapped up kids with examples as a warning not to go that path?
    Just some days ago Chelsea sold Aké for 22 million €€. Given that he was de facto with them for 3 years as a youth player and for the rest was on loan, he probably costed the about 2 million. So they made a 20 million profit for doing nothing (=turning him into a star) in 3 years.
    It's the MO of clubs like Chelsea, gathering youngsters that are never going to be a regular player and sell them on to use the profit for buying a proven star player.
    Yank Miazga is on the same track as was Bruma before them.
    So should the KNVB not issue a warning leaflet that heading that direction means you are going to be de facto the money they will pay for a player like Central Defender Rüdiger for 39 million and you end up in a shit club.
    Contrast the careers of Aké, Ecebilio, Bruma, etc. with that of Wijnaldum, Strootman, Mertens, de Vrij, T. Kongolo, or even Gosens from Heracles.
    Show their parents the few 100k players like Karsdorp and Terence Kongolo missed in the years between 16-18, they make up within a year after their big transfer and are financially going to run out of sight of Ecebilio etc. the coming years.
     
  11. Teak

    Teak Member

    Feyenoord, OKC Energy FC, Real Salt Lake, FC Risa
    Nov 22, 2008
    Grain Belt
    Club:
    Feyenoord
    I doubt that Feyenoord could afford him. He came to MLS from Lanus in Argentina at a cost of $8m. He is on track for the "Rookie" of the year award and will command a higher fee for the next transfer.

    I just wish that Feyenoord would be more active in scouting the South American market.
     
  12. Orange14

    Orange14 Moderator
    Staff Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    Bethesda, MD
    Club:
    AFC Ajax
    Nat'l Team:
    Netherlands
    ^^^Thanks for the link. I like his comment about Chelsea basically wasting money running their academy as they never promote players to the first team. I do think his statement, "Chelsea have arguably the best academy in world football." is wrong. Even Feyenoord's academy is better and of course we all know Ajax's is number one based on the number of players who are on first teams throughout Europe.
     
  13. PuckVanHeel

    PuckVanHeel Member+

    Oct 4, 2011
    Club:
    Feyenoord
    Of course. The current elite players can be divided in two categories:

    1) They don't leave the country until they are 19-20 (Lewandowski, Suarez, De Bruyne, Mane etc.)
    2) They go to familiar cultures with even the same language as they grew up to (Hazard, Messi, even Griezmann)
     
  14. DutchFanatic

    DutchFanatic Member

    Ajax
    Netherlands
    Dec 23, 2013
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Nat'l Team:
    Netherlands
    I agree with your posts completely, and backed you up in the aforementioned thread.

     
  15. PuckVanHeel

    PuckVanHeel Member+

    Oct 4, 2011
    Club:
    Feyenoord
    Don't you think the Portuguese, Belgians, Croatians, even the French have been victim of this too?
     
  16. Would be interesting to see a list of youth players by league of origin in epl academies starting with season 2007 to see a decade of impact.
     
    Orange14 repped this.
  17. Orange14

    Orange14 Moderator
    Staff Member

    Apr 27, 2007
    Bethesda, MD
    Club:
    AFC Ajax
    Nat'l Team:
    Netherlands
    Yes, I wonder about this too. Also, most Dutch youngsters speak English pretty well and I don't know if the same thing is true about Portuguese kids.

    Certainly Ajax were to blame with the loss of a couple of youngsters when management was very slow to offer a contract (T Fosu-Mensah). The did want to keep Reidan and Familia-Castillo (what's he been doing lately?) but both players wanted to leave the academy for the riches of the EPL. I don't know if some of the Feyenoord losses were a result of management not offering youth contracts fast enough.

    I cannot wait for Brexit to be implemented!!!!
     
  18. Bruma claimed the Feyenoord offer wasnot that far off from the Chelsea offer, but hechose to move. Doubt if this is true. Sounds more like an excuse for his move, to make it appear not to be based on money.
    Tahith Chong claims Feyenoord was to vague and waited too long for an offer, but that contradicts with early reports from British papers about Arsenal, Chelsea and ManUnited hot on his heels.
     
  19. PuckVanHeel

    PuckVanHeel Member+

    Oct 4, 2011
    Club:
    Feyenoord

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