HS soccer questions

Discussion in 'High School' started by MonagHusker, Oct 19, 2017.

  1. MonagHusker

    MonagHusker Member

    Liverpool FC
    United States
    Feb 25, 2016
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    HS soccer is a relative unknown to me. I have a 9th grade son in HS who plays football, may run track, hasn’t played soccer since he was 6 and doesn’t care for the sport. I have an 8th grade daughter who will be in HS next year, doesn’t play soccer, and may be done with her athletic career. Then my younger children all play soccer. The one doing the most is like four years away.

    So, in effect, I’m asking you about something that is well into my future and may not come to pass. I guess I just like being prepared! J Also, it’s possible I’ll find a lot in the “A dumb (and loaded) question…” thread that I just started going through.

    All of these may be very school/coach/region/state specific, so feel free to answer however it works where you are:

    1) How important or necessary is playing club/select/soccer to making a HS team? My oldest soccer player is on a club/select team currently, but it is her first season and the team itself is on the lower end of the pay scale. Not being “woe is me,” but not entirely convinced we could afford the more established clubs in our metro area provided she could even make them.

    2) What is the typical roster size (we’ll assume there is a Varsity and JV team)? Would having extra bodies, even with the understanding that they are more like scout team and no play guarantee help? I do feel a little bad for other sports when I hear an AD talk about how they try to limit cuts, but that they will never cut for football.

    3) How much practice time is typically devoted to soccer in HS? What I have to compare it to is football, and what a disparity at pretty much every level. I bet my son practiced more his first time playing football in 5th grade than any of my soccer players at any year. In 9th grade, his football team practiced @ 5 times / week for 2 to 3 hours a practice. I’m not even saying that’s a lot for a typical football team, but it’s a lot more than my other kids have seen in any sport.

    4) Can a player get noticed / scouted by colleges through being a HS player alone? Or is it going to be clubs that get interest or perhaps more specific parental involvement in getting a name out there?

    I’m sure I have more, but I rambled a bit here. I will say, I like kids having an opportunity to play in HS. I understand that most sports make cuts, though I tend to not like it as much prior to the varsity level.

    Thanks as always!
     
  2. mwulf67

    mwulf67 Member+

    Sep 24, 2014
    Club:
    Chelsea FC
    Somewhat important to critical depending on situation….critical if the sport is uber competitive in your area/at your school and cuts will be made….if not so much, then merely somewhat important….my son (freshmen) plays at HS where cuts are not yet needed. As a result, we still have a lot of non-club kids who play…however, it is fairly easy to pick the club kids out from the rec kids talent wise…. if just making the team is all you want, no big deal, but if you want make varsity before your senior year, you need some club experience….

    I believe state HS association limit/dictate the number of roster spots per sport/team….so it’s not necessarily that they want to cut, it’s that they have do so to be in compliance…however, if you only have a limited number of coaches, there are only so many kids you can reasonable deal with….I believe the roster size in my state is 25….25 Varsity, 25 JV…with some kids playing both….some schools are large enough to have Freshmen team, we are not.
    I am sure it varies once again…for me, I’ve been a little disappointed with the amount of practice time…although not universal, it is often said, HS is not about development, it’s about winning… development is what you work on during the off-season/club season…
    Unlikely, scouts don’t typically make it to HS games…college soccer, even at the lowest levels, have a mountain of talent to choose from (for various reasons); no reason to beat the bushes checking out HS-only talent…
     
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  3. MonagHusker

    MonagHusker Member

    Liverpool FC
    United States
    Feb 25, 2016
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Thanks for your reply! It is very insightful. A couple follow-up:

    1) How much practice would you like to see? How many days or hours per practice?

    2) I get the winning component to an extent, but why is time spent developing skills seen as a negative? Not fair for me to always compare it to football, but it seems like that approach is always that we have to work harder/longer in practice than the other guy in order to beat them.

    3) With the amount of the no-HS talent that colleges have to choose from, how come the game is so lamented and considered poor at that level?

    Thanks again!
     
  4. mwulf67

    mwulf67 Member+

    Sep 24, 2014
    Club:
    Chelsea FC
    A lot it has to with the schedule…in season, it is fairly typical to be playing 2-3 games a week…we usually have games Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, now and again…obviously, on games days, you don’t practice….I think that situation is somewhat the norm in HS soccer across the board, lots of games compressed into a rather short season….just not a lot of time left for practice even if you wanted to…

    I would love to see a) a slightly longer season and/or b) just 1 game a week, at least for the first few weeks anyway….

    Not really seen as a negative, but as point out above, there just isn’t a lot of time to devote to developing skills…and whereas the line is blurred, the hard work they put in is more about playing as a team, as opposed to getting better as an individual…sure, kids get better or gain more experience playing HS soccer, but it’s almost incidental. In large part, the more skill you bring in, the more you will get out of HS soccer.

    The average unskilled/lower skilled kid is not going to improve by leaps and bounds simply playing HS soccer imho….

    You have to understand the context of those complaints. Most come for people focused or interested in the US Men team and/or developing a strong pro league. And from that prospective, playing college soccer is a dead end. Nobody (or very, very few) who play college go on to the pros and/or the national team. Developmentally its dead end; it has similar season and scheduling challenges as HS…and by that age, you really do need to be playing year around if you want to improve to a pro or national level….

    The irony, of course, is the college ranks are chalk full of kids who came thought the DA system…a system that is suppose feed/support the national team…so colleges get good talent coming in, but the system just isn’t (yet) designed to improve much on that talent…

    With all that said, I am a big supporter of HS and college soccer…I really do think it’s the long term answer to increasing soccer’s popularity in this country…
     
    bigredfutbol and MonagHusker repped this.
  5. MonagHusker

    MonagHusker Member

    Liverpool FC
    United States
    Feb 25, 2016
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Thanks! I didn't realize the schedule got so congested, but it is unfortunate that it really eats into the practice potential.

    I am with you that I hope the HS and College games become more popular/relevant. Our HS soccer is in the spring so it doesn't have to compete directly with football, volleyball, or basketball to name a few.

    I also think there is a lot of school pride potential. I am new to the "club scene," but I don't get that same feeling. It seems more like a mercenary approach - what club could I make, what club is most affordable, etc. Not to shortchange club, but just not the same.
     
  6. keeper dad

    keeper dad Member

    Jun 24, 2011
    Husker-

    I have been away from Omaha for quite a while but still get back occasionally and may have a little insight. I think a lot of the answers will depend on what high school you are at. I would say in the Millard/Elkhorn area you will probably be looking at cuts and teams composed of mostly club players; the same with Prep or Marion and most likely some of the OPS schools. On the other hand many of the OPS schools will have fewer club kids based on economics and demographics.
     
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  7. MonagHusker

    MonagHusker Member

    Liverpool FC
    United States
    Feb 25, 2016
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Thanks! I know that Marian is tough and if that worked and we could handle the cost, I know athletics aren't a guarantee. The likely route for my soccer playing daughters would be Roncalli (son goes there now) or Omaha Mercy.
     
  8. danni windows

    danni windows New Member

    Liverpool
    United States
    Nov 8, 2017
    I am looking to send my son abroad to Europe (maybe Spain because he is learning Spanish also) can anyone recommend a High School with a soccer academy? He is 15 years old, a good player but he wants a different experience and to send him abroad for a year and experience soccer in Europe I think would be an incredible experience for him but I would like to know if anyone has knowledge or experience with this? Sorry if this is not the thread for this!
     
  9. awlcharris

    awlcharris New Member

    Jan 11, 2017
    If your kid is a great athlete, it's not that important to play club since speed and athleticism shine through in HS. For the average athlete on a HS team who doesn't play club (or only sparingly), it will be glaringly obvious the kid needs more touches on the ball and doesn't understand the game. For the level you indicated, the speed of the game will make your kid look ineffective. That's the biggest difference as you progress up the club continuum: a kid that plays at a lower level will just be jogging back-and-forth as others are in the right spot, playing the ball.

    Here in CO, it is between 16-22 for each team: JV & V. The top 2-3 on JV often occasionally play, or at least dress for V. Some HS teams have a "C" team or "Freshman" league but many don't. Whether or not your HS will limit cuts depends on whether they can fill a full roster with solid players for that level or not.

    My boy's & girl's seasons have gone extremely fast. There is a pre-season summer for boys & winter for girls for a month or two but nothing can be mandatory. Then there is a camp and tryouts over 2-weeks and they are straight into the season after one week and one scrimmage. Practices are every day but only for 1-1/2 hours at the most. 2-3 games every week and then the season ends after 1-1/2 months total. The extremely important post-season State tournament is over 2-weeks and it is one-loss-and-out.

    It is possible but not very likely. Even getting noticed in DA is difficult so I wouldn't expect much from playing HS during prime recruiting time: SO & JR years.

     
  10. mwulf67

    mwulf67 Member+

    Sep 24, 2014
    Club:
    Chelsea FC
    Athleticism certainly helps…but big, fast, strong, whatever, yet still rather unskilled/under-developed, not to mention, soccer dumb will be equally glaringly obvious and ineffective…those kids look great before kickoff, but 5 minutes in you know they aren’t going to do much or hurt you…

    But agree, speed of play is the great divide between high level club kids and the lower, more casual, levels…even if you know proper technique and/or tactics, is quite another thing to execute them at a pace 2 or 3 times faster than your used to….
     
  11. Rob_Crewman

    Rob_Crewman New Member

    Leeds (UK), Vålerenga (NO), Crew (US)
    United States
    Sep 15, 2017
    In my (limited experience) scouts NEVER go to HS games unless they're there for some unrelated reason. So technically a player could get noticed but it's not even remotely the norm or expectation. Good luck tho!
     
  12. HScoach13

    HScoach13 Member

    Nov 30, 2016
    Club:
    Atlanta
    I had two players get noticed and get a partial scholarships because a scout was in attendance to look at a player from the home team.
     
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  13. HScoach13

    HScoach13 Member

    Nov 30, 2016
    Club:
    Atlanta
    Ohh and I almost forgot. I ran into a scout watching the girls team at the school I coach boys at just a few days ago. It was a playoff game. He saw a couple of freshman girls that he saw possibilities with. Otherwise he was unimpressed.
     
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  14. bigredfutbol

    bigredfutbol Moderator
    Staff Member

    Sep 5, 2000
    Woodbridge, VA
    Club:
    DC United
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    FWIW, my son got his scholarship and recruited by word of mouth from his HS coach.
     
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  15. Terrier1966

    Terrier1966 Member

    Nov 19, 2016
    Club:
    Aston Villa FC
    As with most things, the answer is “it depends”.

    The feedback we got from D1 college coaches ( primarily ACC and Big East) was that they never attend HS games for scouting or recruiting.

    They didn’t want HS highlights, didn’t ask about HS accolades and didn’t care if the HS team was undefeated, winless or playing a powerhouse competitor.

    This might depend on the club too...if the club is big, the coach/
    DOC are known and routinely put players into college programs then that may reduce the need for HS interaction.

    I personally know D3 coaches who do attend nearby HS games for scouting.

    In some areas HS and college coaches are well connected to clubs and the lines can get blurry if the HS coach also coaches at a club.

    Recruiting profiles request HS coach info as that may be helpful in the application and acceptance process.
    We found the college interaction was with club coaches, despite the HS team and coach being well respected. There were due diligence calls to the HS coach before offers were made but the discussion was about academics and personal reference.

    Results will vary but I wouldn’t put faith in HS being the litmus test or conduit...it could happen but it isn’t a common outcome.
     

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