boca juniors greatest XI of all times

Discussion in 'Boca Juniors' started by el-torero, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    are you agreed with this boca juniors Greatest XI of all times?

    Boca Juniors Greatest XI (4-2-2-2):

    Roma

    Ibarra - Mouze - Samuel - Marzolini

    Rattin - Sone

    Maradona - Riquelme

    Palermo - Varallo


    Antonio Roma, goalkeeper (1960-72):

    Perhaps the most idolized number one in the history of Boca Juniors, Roma joined the Xeneixes from Ferro in 1960, and along with such legendary figures as Antonio Rattin and Silvio Marzolini was a fixture in one of the greatest sides ever to wear the blue and gold shirt. Roma won five titles with Boca through the decade, and also represented a Boca dominated Argentina in the 1962 and 1966 World Cups.

    Silvio Marzolini, left back (1960-72):

    A true icon in Boca history, Marzolini joined the club from Ferro at the age of just 20 and would spend the rest of his career at the club, wowing domestic and international crowds alike with his talents down the left flank. Contemporary of the legendary Antonio Rattin, the player lifted five leagues in Boca and is considered one of the best left backs of all time.

    Roberto Mouzo, center back (1971-84):

    Mouzo holds the record for most appearances for Boca, playing a total of 426 games in a 13-year career as the Xeneixe defensive linchpin. The highlight of Mouzo’s long career was lifting the club’s first ever Copa Libertadores in 1977, followed by the club being crowned world champions in the same year beating Borussia Moenchengladbach.

    Walter Samuel, center back (1997-2000):

    ‘El Muro’ (The wall)’s spell at Boca was short but sweet, earning wide plaudits for his uncompromising play in the center of defense and playing a major part in the all-conquering Xeneixe team of the turn of the century. In just three years Samuel appeared in over 100 games, and lifted two domestic championships and a Copa Libertadores as Carlos Bianchi’s men proved to be almost unbeatable.

    Hugo Ibarra, right back (1998-2001, 2002-03, 2005-10):

    ‘El Negro’ is a true icon in the Bombonera, in which he played three separate spells between jaunts to Europe and racked up over 200 games. In his time at Boca Ibarra helped them to win every single major trophy possible, at domestic, continental and international before finally retiring earlier this year with a total of 15 championships earned in the Xeneixe colors.

    Antonio Rattin, midfielder (1956-70):

    An infamous name for English football fans after the controversial 1966 World Cup quarter-final match, Rattin was also a towering midfield presence and a talisman for Boca in the glory years of the 1960s. Now a politician, the veteran of over 350 games led Boca to four national championships in the decade and also represented Argentina 34 times.

    Ruben Sone, midfielder (1967-72, 1976-80):

    In two trophy-filled spells with Boca Juniors, Sone managed to bridge the gap between a pair of memorable Xeneixe generations: that of Rattin and Marzolini in the 1960s and the team of the late 1970s and early 80s which brought home back to back Copa Libertadores trophies- the first of which being Boca’s first ever continental success. He is best remembered however for scoring the winning goal against River Plate in the final of the 1976 National Championship, which turned him into a true Bombonera icon.

    Diego Maradona, number 10 (1981-82, 1995-97):
    [​IMG]
    Try as I might, it was just impossible to overlook the little genius Maradona in a list of Boca idols. His time at the club may have been limited but it electrified fans who packed the Bombonera to see him, and it was at Boca where he picked up his first club honor. The 1981 national championship would prove to be one of many honors the controversial number 10 won in a sparkling career. Diego finished his career at his boyhood idols, and a tearful 1997 farewell to his fans and his “La pelota no se mancha” speech will go down in club folklore forever.

    Juan Roman Riquelme, number 10 (1995-02, 2007-):
    [​IMG]
    Only in Boca, and only for this remarkable playmaker, could Diego Maradona be relegated to second fiddle. In the Bombonera however it is Roman who rules the roost over the best player ever to step on a football pitch. Blessed with incredible control and vision and a right foot that seems trained to find a teammate no matter how unlikely the pass, Riquelme was voted the greatest player of Boca’s history in a recent poll.

    Martin Palermo, centre forward (1997-2000, 2004-10):

    There are more elegant center forwards, more consistent players and a lot more talented players who have worn the Boca strip; but not one typifies the sacrifice and loyalty that leads one to become a true club legend. Recently crowned the club’s highest ever scorer (and with a band of loyal fans which count every strike on a giant banner in the Bombonera), ‘El Titan’s’ incredible career shows no sign of ending even though the lumbering striker recently turned 37.

    Francisco Varallo, centre forward (1931-40):

    A native of La Plata just like that other iconic number nine ‘El Titan’, Varallo passed away two months ago aged 100 and was treated to a moving remembrance amongst Boca fans, who despite the majority being to young to have ever seen him play nevertheless honored a man who has gained legendary status in La Boca. ‘El Canoncito’ helped the Xeneixes to three league titles, and with 180 goals was the club’s highest scorer in the professional era until Palermo broke the record in 2008.

    http://www.goal.com/en-us/news/3297...oca-juniors-ideal-xi-the-best-of-the-bosteros
     
  2. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    or this line-up is better?

    (4-3-1-2):

    Gatti

    Sosa - Rattin - Samuel - Marzolini

    Caniggia - Gago - Riquelme

    Maradona

    Tevez - Palermo

    Hugo Gatti
    Goalkeeper

    Boca 1976-1988; 381 appearances, 1 goal
    Known as 'Beatle Gatti', the first Argentinean footballer to grow his hair long was part of Argentina's 1966 World Cup squad, but it was during his time at Boca in the 70's that 'El Loco' was at his maddest and most magnificent best. He achieved legendary status when the club won the Copa de Libertadores (South American equivalent of European Cup) two years running in 77 and 78, and the subsequent Intercontinental Cup victory versus Borussia Monchengladbach (a match, which should have been against Liverpool, but the European Champions pulled out much to the disappointment of South Americans, who have always taken the competition very seriously).

    Gatti revolutionised goalkeeping attire in South America by donning long shorts and brightly-coloured jerseys when previously Lev Yashin black had been standard wear. Famous for dribbling out of his goal, long before Rene Higuita was around, Gatti could also pass the ball with accuracy. Operating as sweeper and taking throw-ins were features of his play. Off the pitch, he adopted the rhyming hubris of his idol Mohammad Ali, reminding everyone he was the best. Gatti wasn't actually a goalkeeper but a footballer who used his hands, reckoned manager Toto Lorenzo. In one famous match against Estudiantes that clinched the league title in 1981, he dribbled out to the halfway line, taking the ball around two opponents, before supplying the pass for a goal.

    Gatti is also remembered for the 'God Stop'. In 'one on ones', he would go down on his kness in front of opposing forwards, arms outstretched as if praising God, but narrowing the angle and rarely beaten - a manoeuvre that required extreme agility and confidence.

    There were two schools of goalkeeping in Argentina throughout the 70s. One represented by the text-book efficiency of Filliol at River Plate, the other, the spontaneous, eccentric brilliance of Gatti, who was Argentina manager Cesar Menotti's first choice. Unfortunately, injury prevented Gatti from appearing at the '78 world cup, which Argentina won. Had he played in that tournament, Gatti would probably now be as famous in the rest of the world as he is South America.

    Antonio Rattin
    Central defender

    Boca 1956-1970; 352 appearances, 26 goals
    With his imposing 6ft 4in frame, Rattin was the original 'Caudillo' (general). Captain of the 1962, 1964, and 1965 league championship winning Boca teams, he played mainly as a holding midfielder, but is chosen at centre back for convenience of line up in our dream team.

    A hard player, but a technically gifted one as well, Rattin was a natural leader on the pitch. Most of Boca's, and indeed Argentina's play in the sixties would go through captain Rattin. He kept it simple, with short passing triangles, and was rarely beaten in the air. He twice marked Pele out of key matches, the first against Santos in the final of the 62 Libertadores, and then, again in the Maracana, when Argentina beat Brazil in the 1964 Nations Cup, a tournament which Argentina won, beating England 1-0 in their final match.

    In England, Rattin will always be remembered for his controversial sending off (pictured) in the World Cup quarter final against England at Wembley in 1966, and his long, slow, dramatic walk around the side of the pitch, before sitting down on the royal red carpet, an action that was interpreted as an insult to the Queen back in South America.

    Currently involved in politics, he was a member of the Congress until recently, and to this day is convinced that all that happened in '66 was a conspiracy, pre-arranged by Stanley Rous, the English president of Fifa, to ensure the host's progress in the competition.

    Walter Samuel
    Central defender

    Boca 1997-2000; 75 appearances, 4 goals
    Dubbed 'the Wall' and considered the best young centre back in the world during his time at Boca. Signed from Newell's Old Boys in 1997, he formed a solid centre back partnership with the Colombian, Jorge Bermudez, in Carlos Bianchi's team that won consecutive league titles in 98 and 99, and the Libertadores in 2000.

    Samuel transferred to Fabio Capello's Roma for €20m in the summer of 2000, a world record fee for a defender at the time, and won Serie A with Roma, before transferring to Real Madrid for another big fee, €25m, in 2004.

    Has suffered serious injury problems at Real Madrid and Inter, but is gradually regaining his old form under Mourinho, returning to the Argentina squad last month. Samuel has 53 international caps.

    Carlos 'Lucho' Sosa
    Right back

    Boca 1941-1951; 294 appearances, 9 goals
    Legendary player from the 1940s, the 'Golden Age' of Argentinean football, when attendances were among the highest in the world, and the emphasis was as much on style as results. In the era of 'La Nuestra' (our style), football was likened to the steps of the tango dance.

    The pencil-moustached Sossa liked to attack down the right flank, and, despite being a defender, earnt the nickname of 'the bailerina' for his graceful movement on the ball.

    He made 217 appearances for Boca between 1941 and 1951, winning two league championships in 1943 and 1944, before transferring to Racing Club of Paris in 1951. Sosa was named in a poll of 100 journalists in Argentina's team of the 20th century.

    Silvio Marzolini
    Left back

    Boca 1960-1972; 387 appearances, 10 goals
    Stylish, handsome, the David Beckham of his day, Marzolini spent nearly all of his long career at Boca, whereas if he was around today, he would no doubt be playing for a top European club with marketing companies milking his good looks for all their worth.

    Even in the sixties, the man with a passing resemblance to David Macallum in the man from U.N.C.L.E series was starring in adverts for local Argentine beer.

    Another attacking full back, very skilful on the ball, Marzolini won league titles with Boca in 1962, 64,and 65, aswell as playing alongside his captain Rattin in the national side throughout the same period, winning the Nations Cup with Argentina in 64. Voted by the British press as the best player of the group stages of the 1966 World Cup, Marzolini played for the rest of the world team in Stanley Matthews testimonial at Stoke City's Victoria Ground in 67.

    After making 387 appearances for Boca, the 3rd highest in the club's history, Marzolini retired in 1972, returning as manager 10 years later and guiding his club to the 1981 league title.

    Claudio Caniggia
    Right midfield

    Boca 1995-1998; 60 appearances, 28 goals
    This is a very attacking Boca Jnrs dream team, so, due to the excess of strikers, Caniggia is pulled back to play on the wing, where he can run at opponents with his pace and skill.

    Caniggia joined Boca in 1995 after serving a 13 match cocaine ban, and formed a quite formidable partnership with his great friend Diego Maradona, both on and off the pitch. With manager Hector Veira's blond mullet, colourful jackets, and well-known fondness for the Buenos Aires nightlife, the club became known as 'The Cabaret' at that time. But there was no doubting the quality of some of the football played.

    Caniggia, the complete striker, was a skilful creator as well as goalscorer, and, despite all the off the field distractions, the crowd enjoyed the way the team played, and Boca nearly won the league in 1998, but for a difference of 1 point.

    Caniggia missed out on the 1990 World Cup final due to a yellow card for an innocuous handball in the semi-final. He played in every game during Argentina's ill-fated 1994 campaign, but then fell fowl of manager Passarella's long-hair rule for the 1998 World Cup.

    Caniggia, an accomplished rock drummer, who has recorded material and named one of his sons Axel after Guns 'N' Roses singer Axel Rose, refused to go the barbers and so lost his place in the team. However, an unlikely renaissance at Dundee and Rangers in Scotland, saw Caniggia recalled to the Argentina squad for the 2002 World Cup at the age of 36, where he became the first player to receive a red card at a World Cup without actually playing in a single game.

    Fernando Gago
    Holding midfielder

    Boca 2004-2007; 70 appearances, 1 goal
    The current Real Madrid player was brilliant as a 19-year-old at Boca, making the holding role his own, and keeping stalwart Sebastian Battalgia out of the side. Graceful in possession, Gago saw breaking the opposition's play as only part of the defensive midfielder's role. He also liked to create from the centre of the pitch with precise through balls to the strikers.

    A home grown product of Ramon Madonni's youth academy, the teenage Gago was the lynchpin of Alfo Basile's Boca side that won the double of league and Copa Sudamerica (equivalent of Uefa Cup) in 2005. Having been watched by every top club in Europe, he opted to join Real Madrid for a fee of around €20m, and is now a first choice in Maradona's national side.

    Roman Riquelme
    Left midfielder

    Boca 1996-2002 & 2007-present; 197 appearances, 46 goals
    Roman, as it says on his shirt, has always played as 'le enganche' (the link) behind the strikers at Boca, but is on the left of midfield in our dream team because the number 10 shirt is reserved for someone else. Probably no player in world football divides opinion quite like Riquelme does. His detractors complain that he doesn't track back, or that his mode of playing is out of date, but at Boca Juniors he is adored by the fans.

    The key player in Bianchi's great side that won the Libertadores three times in the early 2000's, and the World Club Championship against Real Madrid in 2000, Riquelme plays the game at his own rhythm, often 'pausing' on the ball, waiting for the perfect pass, and he is one of the best in the world from dead-ball situations. With astonishing vision, he can pull off the unexpected, picking out passes that most in the crowd cannot see.

    Returning to Boca on loan from Villareal in 2007, he was simply brilliant in the Libertadores Cup run, as Boca won the trophy again. However, he has been plagued with injury problems since making the move back to Boca permanent. A prickly character who has fallen out with many managers during his career, Riquelme recently announced his retirement from the Argentina national team for the second time.

    Diego Maradona
    Free role

    Boca 1981-1982 & 1995-1997; 71 appearances, 35 goals
    In 1980, Barcelona President Josep Nuñez flew to Buenos Aires to sign Argentinos Juniors' teenage prodigy for a world record $6m. There's a great photo in Clarin on 5 May 1980 that shows Nuñez and his directors, besuited with serious business faces, sitting around a table with the 19-year-old, while an assortment of scruffily-dressed family and friends stand in the background. Jorge Cyterzspiler, one of Maradona's mates from the shanty town where he grew up, had recently been appointed Maradona's agent, and the two of them look like a pair of mischievous kids who can't believe what is happening as Maradona puts pen to paper, Cyterzspiller, in a leather jacket, is grinning from ear to ear with a cigarette in his mouth.

    However, the transfer was cancelled by the Argentinean Football Association a few days later. A new rule introduced by the military dictatorship: stated that no player under the age of 20 would be allowed to leave Argentina. "Resolution 37 exists for the good of Argentina, for the good of our football clubs, for the good of our players, and for the good of the national team,", said AFA president Julio Grondona,, who still holds the position today. "Rules are rules, and they are to be obeyed without exceptions. I believe we can find a satisfactory solution to all this", said Grondona, "I believe we can find businesses in our country that can fund Argentinos Juniors and Maradona nearly as much money as Barcelona are willing to pay them".

    And so, there it is, back in 1980, for the first time, a player becomes owned not by a club, but a third party; a consortium of agents and commercial interests. In the end, Maradona was loaned to Boca Juniors for a year (by the business consortium that bought him from Argentinos Jnrs), before finally joining Barcelona in 1982.

    And what a year at Boca it turned out to be. They won the league in 81 with Maradona at his brilliant best. An array of stunning goals, too many to choose from, but perhaps the most famous came in the 'superclassico' against arch-rivals River Plate. Maradona dribbles through the whole of the River defence, but when he has just goalkeeper Fillol to beat, Maradona doesn't only go round him once, but goes back and beats him again, leaving Argentina's World Cup winning keeper, scrambling around on all fours, before the Boca number 10 cooly dispatches the ball into the net.

    A chubbier version of Maradona returned to Boca for a couple of seasons in 1996. His pace had gone, but he could still spray passes around with accuracy, a feature of Maradona's game that often gets overlooked - even when he was at his peak, he would spend 90 per cent of matches playing simple passes, knocking it first time to evade his markers, while waiting for the right moment to conjure up a piece of genius.

    Boca's most famous player is also their most famous fan, often seen excitedly leaning out of his corporate box in a replica shirt, while his daughters and friends hold him around the waist to prevent him from falling out.

    Carlos Tevez
    Striker

    Boca 2001-2004; 75 appearances, 26 goals
    The 'People's Player'. The cropped-haired teenager with the name 'Carlitos' on his back was an instant hit with Boca fans. They knew he came from Fuerte Apache, one of the poorest and most violent ghettos in Buenos Aires, and he was living their dreams; a fan turning out for his boyhood team and openly loving every minute of it.

    "Not even Carlos Tevez knows what his best position is, so we just put him on the pitch and let him get on with it", manager Carlos Bianchi once said. Tevez made his debut in 2001 and won four titles with Boca - Libertadores Cup in 2003, the Intercontinental Cup against AC Milan in 2003, The league in 2003, and the Copa Sudamerica in 2004.

    One of the goals he is most fondly remembered for came against River Plate in the quarter-finals of the 2003 Libertadores Cup. Boca fans had been banned from the return leg due to violence in the first leg at Boca's stadium. The River fans were duly called 'chickens' by opposing supporters, and upon scoring in the second leg, Tevez celebrated by doing an impression of a chicken in front of the home fans, for which he was promptly shown the red card.

    Amusingly, the referee repeated the chicken impression three times in front of the River Plate fans, to explain why he was sending Tevez off.

    Martin Palermo
    Striker

    Boca 1997-2000 & 2004-present; 235 appearances, 157 goals
    The symbol of Boca Jnrs over the last decade, scoring crucial goals, including the two against Real Madrid in the 2000 World Club championship final.

    Palermo is not a typical Argentine striker, in fact much of his play resembles more of a traditional English-style centre forward, particularly his ability in the air. Not the most technically-gifted, he makes up for his deficiencies, with physical strength and work-rate, although occasionally surprises with a spectacular long shot, or bicycle kick, as was his recent 200th goal for Boca.

    The club's highest ever scorer in the professional era is now just 20 goals off from becoming their greatest goalscorer of all-time.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/...ca-juniors-1695271.html?action=Gallery&ino=11
     
  3. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    if this boca (4-2-2-2):

    Roma


    Ibarra - Mouze - Samuel - Marzolini

    Rattin - Sone

    Maradona - Riquelme

    Palermo - Varallo

    vs

    this boca (4-3-1-2):

    Gatti


    Sosa - Rattin - Samuel - Marzolini

    Caniggia - Gago - Riquelme

    Maradona

    Tevez - Palermo

    what is the outcome result?

    discuss....






     
  4. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    my opinion is, the 2nd boca greatest xi (4-3-1-2) will win against 1st boca greatest xi (4-2-2-2) cause their attacking force is hard to be contain compare to 1st one

    for me, their defence (2nd boca) is more stabile compare to 1st boca
     
  5. colombialove banned

    Aug 4, 2011
    Falta Oscar Cordoba
     
  6. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    oscar cordoba was a great gk for boca, but still can't beat the legendary gatti or roma, i guess....

    maybe he can be a sub for this boca greatest xi
     
  7. argentine soccer fan

    Staff Member

    Jan 18, 2001
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    Tough one, but here's my eleven.

    ...............Roma
    Lucho Sosa...Da Guia...Mouzo...Marzolini
    ..................Rattin
    ....Angel Rojas..Maradona...Riquelme
    ........Varallo......Palermo
     
  8. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    what is so special about this 2 guys? can you describe to me
     
  9. EnglishBostero

    Mar 21, 2011
    Accrington
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    England
    I am not old enough to remember lots of these players, and have only seen them on videos and in documentaries, so im gonna cheat and go for a boca team of the last 15 years, should be easy enough

    Pato
    Ibarra Burdisso Samuel Clemente

    Battaglia

    Guillermo Riquelme Cannigia

    Maradona

    Palermo

    Could cannigia play on the left? I would play riquelme a little deeper to accomodate maradona, it was quite hard to decide between mouche and maradona;)))) Either way, this team would be quite fun to watch i think
     
  10. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    you compare mouche with maradona???

    you are funny, my friend...... :D

    nice to know you all
     
  11. argentine soccer fan

    Staff Member

    Jan 18, 2001
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    Many old timers considered Domingos Da Guia to be the best central defender in the club’s history. He may be a reach because his time as Boca was short, but the guy is also a legend in Brazil, and he is acknowledged as an all-time great.

    http://www.world-football-legends.co.uk/domingosdaguia.php

    http://www.informexeneize.com.ar/biografia_domingos_da_guia.htm

    Angel Clemente Rojas, known as Rojitas is one of the club's biggest idols. A withdrawn forward and playmaker, he could both score and create goals, and he had amazing dribbling skills. He won five titles with Boca in the 60s through 1970.

    http://www.informexeneize.com.ar/biografia_angel_clemente_rojas.htm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ángel_Clemente_Rojas
     
  12. el-torero

    el-torero Member

    Aug 10, 2011
    malaysia
    Club:
    CA Boca Juniors
    Country:
    Argentina
    thanks for the info, my friend

    i appreciate it :)
     
  13. haihaihai

    haihaihai New Member

    Jan 4, 2011
    not a Bostero, but still...

    Goalie: pick any one of Tesoriere, Roma and Gatti

    RB: Sosa, Francisco Sa or Lazzatti

    CB: Any of Bidoglio, De Guia, Pescia and Mouzo

    LB: Marzolini

    DM: Any of

    CM: Sune

    AM: Any of Roman, Diego, Trobbiani and Latorre

    F: Tarasconi, Cherro, Varallo, Delfin Caceres, Angelito Rojas, Mastrangelo, Schelotto, Palermo

    They these fellas didn't play for long, but such enormous talents still deserve a shout:
    Brindisi
    Sanfilippo
    Corbatta

    The best I saw:

    GK: Gatti

    RB: Francisco Sa

    CB: Mouzo and Arruabarrena (CB or LB)

    LB: can't think of any

    DM: Sune, Marangoni (didn't play long, but a brilliant footballer is never bad to have)

    AM: Trobbiani/Diego, Roman

    F: Mastrangelo, Palermo
     
  14. JGGott

    JGGott Member

    Nov 10, 2012
    I wouldn't include Maradona. There are players that were more important to Boca than him. Maradona played about 70 games with Boca and won 1 title, I believe... That's just not enough. Riquelme is a far greater player for Boca Juniors than Maradona, for example.
    I repeat: FOR Boca. Not in general, obviously.

    I think you need, AT LEAST, 100+ games and a few important titles to qualify as an idol for a club, with true importance for its history.

    It's not just about being the best; it's also about what you achieve in the club.

    Domingos da Guia is still widely regarded as the greatest Centre-Back ever in the history of Brazilian football.

    Not sure he played long enough for Boca either, though.
     

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