News: Bob Bradley speaks out

Discussion in 'USA Men: News & Analysis' started by neems, Jan 18, 2018.

  1. kokoplus10

    kokoplus10 Moderator
    Staff Member

    Feb 5, 2008
    Club:
    New York Red Bulls
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Like I said, the source would not say WHY/HOW his hand was forced. I’m sure more creative minds than mine could come up with a litany of theories as to what that reason or reasons were.
     
  2. sXeWesley

    sXeWesley Member+

    Jun 18, 2007
    Club:
    Portland Timbers
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I find it extremely hard to believe that Bob would ever choose a central midfielder for anything other than purely performance based reasons.

    Take that as you will.
     
  3. jond

    jond Member+

    Sep 28, 2010
    On My Squatty Potty
    Club:
    Levski Sofia
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    This brings up an interesting point. Coaches from Germany in Spain. A coach from Turkey in Spain. A coach from Holland in Spain.

    Overseas coaches regularly travel outside their borders to learn and climb the ladder. American coaches here a pretty much immune to that. Not only are they arrogant but they also close themselves off from the rest of the world. Bob going abroad is a pretty rare thing for Americans. Chero is in Germany but he's transitioning from being a player there to a coach. Then there's Wagner who grew up in Germany and went from BVB II to Huddersfield.

    Why aren't American coaches going abroad to learn? Is Caleb Porter who's still pretty young going to go try and find a gig overseas and learn in a better environment? Why or why not? Tata's coached on three continents. Has any American ever done that? Vieira came across the pond to jump start his career. Paunovic too, among others.

    American coach after American coach has zero experience outside our landscape. Arena, Olsen, Sigi, Marsch, Petke, Porter, Vermes, Vanney, Curtin and Kreis(who did spend 6 months in Manchester) combined haven't coached a single game outside our landscape. Neither have previous coaches like Kinnear, Yallop, Sarachan, Mastroeni, Hyndman, Onalfo, Klopas, Hackworth and on and on.

    Actually I think Berhalter after trying his hand at Hammarby is the only American coach who's coached in MLS who has coached in another country. Until Bob.

    Why is this? Our coaches just aren't that good. So why stay in an environment where the teaching won't be good instead of going abroad and really learning? Scared? Lack of ambition? Comfort? Looking at resumes of countless coaches overseas you regularly see experience in numerous countries.

    We need American coaches when starting their careers to be overseas in that environment, day in day out soaking up the knowledge. Then come back home and start teaching it.
     
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  4. Master O

    Master O Member+

    Jul 7, 2006
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    For the most part, the USA is an insular country. It cares not at all for the rest of the world. If it doesn't happen in the US, it gets zero coverage or attention.
     
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  5. scoachd1

    scoachd1 Member+

    Jun 2, 2004
    Southern California
    If only it were that good. Most of the decision making with regard to development have been being by guys without Ivy level cognitive skills and without much in the way of solid development experience. So what you end up with is ill-thought out solutions that fail to address the real problems.

    Innovation comes from people with expertise. It often involves people with taking expertise from one domain and applying to another where they also have some expertise or in working in collaboration with someone that has expertise.
     
  6. scoachd1

    scoachd1 Member+

    Jun 2, 2004
    Southern California
    I agree with your point, but I will add that Europe is like the size of the US. We have coaches that move in different states while is in terms of distance moving to different countries.

    The problem I have is that the experience of people heading up our development is laughable compared to the rest of the world. Tab Ramos coaching experience consisted coaching some mediocre teams at NJSA 04. But at least he spent a few years in Spain and one in Mexico and presumably picked up a few things on how they develop players.

    In contrast Tony Lepore another key person in setting US soccer DA program and talent ID according to a 2009 SA article "spent a decade as an elementary and middle school guidance counselor before dedicating himself full-time to youth soccer." and "played college soccer at Keene State and semipro ball with the Cape Cod Crusaders and New Hampshire Phantoms. He coached high school ball, was New Hampshire's ODP Director of Coaching and the DOC of Seacoast United." Let's just say Seachoast has not exactly been tearing up the DA.
     
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  7. IndividualEleven

    Mar 16, 2006
    How practical is it for an American coach to go to a major European soccer country? Who is going to hire him? Bob had the cache of having been the USNT's coach and that only got him gigs in Sweden and the second div of France---leaving aside the lark in England for an American-owned EPL team. Bruce had offers from the 3rd of England.
     
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  8. Susaeta

    Susaeta BigSoccer Supporter

    Apr 3, 2009
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    You could leave a comfortable job coaching a university team in the states, and take your resume abroad. The almost universal answer would be, “So what?” You could show them your USSF A license, and they would probably try to suppress a laugh. They would want to know what players you developed, and where those players ended up playing. When you tell them how many kids you helped get college scholarships, they would stop trying to suppress the laughter.

    But if, by some miracle, you were offered a job, it would be near the bottom of the ladder. You will need to be independently wealthy, or you will need to find roommates. You will barely make enough to survive, and will have to find a second job (which is also nearly impossible).

    And you would be taking this enormous life changing risk for the very real possibility you will be graded out as a coach within 12 months, because the competition is fierce.

    I do not see it happening that often.

    Which is why I think that in addition to buying creative talent from Latin America, MLS ought to consider hiring some of the coaches who developed that talent. It will ultimately make the American player and coach better.

    You may not be able to find a job over there, but you can bring some world class youth coaches here for a decent price. Not saying this fixes everything - in fact there would be some dramatic culture shock and turbulence as you get started - but that is exactly what they did in Spain, what they did more recently in England, and the results have been pretty consistent. Bring in great coaches, develop great coaches, and great players magically start appearing.
     
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  9. largegarlic

    largegarlic Member+

    Jul 2, 2007
    I think it's going to have to be former players with respectable careers in Europe who are most likely to get a shot as coaches. Cherundolo is obviously one to keep an eye on, and I'm also interested in seeing how things go with Friedel. He seemed to be well regarded in England, and didn't he work on getting UEFA coaching licenses in his last couple years at Spurs? If he does well with NE (however unlikely that might be), maybe he'll get a chance.
     
  10. bsky22

    bsky22 Member+

    Dec 8, 2003
    So the two clear options for an American to get an opportunity abroad are to play over there and be highly regarded at the club (cherundolo) or have a ridiculously talented teenager with a passport (Pulisic). It seems like we more options because that won’t generate many numbers.

    The short term (but no reason to have to stop) solution is to hire foreign coaches. The fed has hired a couple of Dutch guys and it has been suggested above to bring the South American coaches that are developing the young talent that MLS is buying more and more. I don’t see a reason to stop there. I’d think MLS and other DA teams (that are pay to play) should have incentives and funds to look all over the world for the best coaches that fit the clubs philosophy.

    Maybe it’s too optimistic, but the combination of the foreign coaches relationships back in their home country, MLS foreign club affiliations, and support of the federation, we should be able to find more opportunities for coaches to gain experience outside of the US, even if just part of a 6-12 month exchange.

    I’d think if an MLS team hired a Colombian or Argentinian coach, he’d want and would be able to help coaches in their program to go spend some time learning the game where he learned it. If MLS is going to send coaches to French coaching schools, it doesn’t seem too crazy that to think those coaches couldn’t find opportunities in France (with some help from MLS/Fed, possibly even including funding). There is no need to stop at France. Hopefully, these efforts of foreign based formal training can be expanded to other countries as well.

    Even if just for a short trip and being laughed at is part of it, there are opportunities for coaches who’s are able and willing to make the effort (another area that Fed support/funding may be helpful and worthwhile)...

    The three-time state champions and coaching staff recently returned from a trip to Barcelona where they were once again engulfed by the culture.

    “On a personal level, it has helped me and the coaches,” Brian Kleiban told TopDrawerSoccer.com about the annual trip. “From my perspective, I have been in the academy and watching their academy training sessions - that information is invaluable to me. It has molded the coach that I am today.”

    Brian went on to say that the club president, Paul Walker, insisted on the idea that it had to start with the coaches. Now, Brian has seized that opportunity and soaked up all the information he can from these trips.

    For the past three years, the players have soaked in the experience too.

    “Expose the players to that, and Barcelona to the talent we have in the States,” Brian said. “At first, they were laughing at us. Three years later, the respect level has grown tremendously.”


    https://www.topdrawersoccer.com/clu...lona-in-usa-–-a-youth-clubs-ambition_aid24205
     
  11. laxcoach

    laxcoach Member+

    Borussia Dortmund
    United States
    Jul 29, 2017
    I like it. If Europe makes it close to impossible to go over there, bring it over here. There are some real talented coaches either currently out of work (Tuchel), or retired. Can't some be approached as 'consultants' at a minimum to pay them to come here and teach us how to teach? Every camp of pros or potential pros would be best served by multiple approaches to teaching skills and tactics.

    If the non profit known as the USSF has so much damn money then I can't imagine a much better investment for long term growth of the sport.
     
  12. dredgfan

    dredgfan Member+

    MLS
    Nov 5, 2004
    Denver or NOLA
    Club:
    Colorado Rapids
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Bless those boys
     
  13. scoachd1

    scoachd1 Member+

    Jun 2, 2004
    Southern California
    Completely agree. We used to have two coaching problems: 1) parents that didn't know the game which put our kids irreparably behind from the start; 2) Coaches that didn't know how to coach.

    As more kids have become second generation players and the game has become more popular, the first has gone away. Unfortunately the second largely remains. Just look at the background of the the people that directing our Academy and youth national teams which should be among the best of the best to see how far we are behind. Many of our bigger clubs DOC's couldn't get a professional coaching job at any level in other parts of the world.
     
  14. scoachd1

    scoachd1 Member+

    Jun 2, 2004
    Southern California
    The other alternative is to consistently develop good players and good teams. Then either work for a respected foreign coach here or spend some time getting your license abroad so you can make some contacts and get a job to prove yourself. The bar is really low here, so good young coaches will stand out.
     
  15. dredgfan

    dredgfan Member+

    MLS
    Nov 5, 2004
    Denver or NOLA
    Club:
    Colorado Rapids
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    Worse. Nike is pawning off products to others like Virgil at kith and offXwhite.

    Even some collaboration products are merely branding by changing colors and adding a name.
     
  16. bsky22

    bsky22 Member+

    Dec 8, 2003
    I’m for as many alternatives as possible to get more knowledgeable people involved in coaching in the US and getting the Americans who show an aptitude and have the interest, access to the game abroad (Europe, South America, etc).

    I think I alluded to those options, but in more specific manner where there would likely be assistance in the funding, which of course isn’t required.
     
  17. IndividualEleven

    Mar 16, 2006
    Aye, that is what I had hinted at. I saw references to the need for American coaches to go abroad, a scenario which did not seem feasible. The career paths of Berhalter, Cherundolo, and Friedel would seem to be the best that can be accomplished in such regards: former euro-league players who obtained UEFA badges and some coaching experience. I'd like to see Cherundolo garner major consideration for the National Team job.

    MLS's improved finances certain make the importation of elite youth-coaching talent feasible.
     
  18. VBCity72

    VBCity72 Member+

    Aug 17, 2014
    Oki, J-pan
    Club:
    Plymouth Argyle FC
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    I think Cherundolo needs to actually be a head coach first before getting consideration for the NT job.
     
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  19. skim172

    skim172 Member+

    Feb 20, 2013
    Not to mention the practical issues of immigration laws and obtaining visas. For US coaches going abroad, and vice versa. That's a major hassle. And not too many world-class coaches will view the USA as a prime destination - unless we're willing to overpay like the Chinese Super-League does to pull a few big names out of semi-retirement.

    I think this is a situation where there is no quick solution. We've still got a long road to go in terms of development. That's a reality we need to accept. We've made major strides getting MLS organized, but we've got decades left to try to catch up.
     
  20. Master O

    Master O Member+

    Jul 7, 2006
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    So as US fans, we can "look forward" to decades of also-ran status?
     
  21. laxcoach

    laxcoach Member+

    Borussia Dortmund
    United States
    Jul 29, 2017
    If US fans want to watch good soccer anytime in the next few years, they need a club team in BL or LaLiga or EPL to follow.
     
  22. TrueCrew

    TrueCrew Member+

    Dec 22, 2003
    Columbus, OH
    Club:
    Columbus Crew
    Nat'l Team:
    United States
    1) Regis didn't start a match.

    2) Though the formation varied, none of those guys, save perhaps Hejduk & Pablo, was a first XI choice. You either don't remember correctly or are cherry picking. Pablo only played cause we went 352 and needed 3 CMs. Goos & Berhalter split the same spot so you cannot count both. 3G in the knockouts.

    3) I would gladly take Sanneh, Pope, Berhalter, & Hejduk at the back over what Arena played in qualifying. Friedel, McBride, Landon, Reyna and O'Brien are obviously superior to what we have now. That leaves 1 other player: Pablo/Lewis/Stewart/DMB/Mathis + Pulisic as your XI, depending on how you set up.

    Starts at the '02 Worl Cup in 5 games:
    Friedel - 5
    Sanneh - 5
    Pope - 5
    O'Brien - 5
    Donovan - 5
    McBride - 5
    Reyna - 4
    Hejduk - 4
    Mastroeni - 3
    Agoos - 3
    Stewart - 2
    Beasley - 2
    Mathis - 2
    Berhalter - 2
    Lewis - 2
    Wolff - 1

    http://www.planetworldcup.com/CUPS/2002/qf_ger_v_usa.html
     
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  23. skim172

    skim172 Member+

    Feb 20, 2013
    Yes.

    Not to say we won't have peaks of glory along the way. There will be times when it all clicks together and we get a great run. But it won't be consistent. It's going to take decades before we become the type of organization that can steadily and consistently be competitive on the world stage. The world's best have had over a century to build up the infrastructure, the culture, the networks - but for us, soccer in the country effectively died in the 1930s. It wasn't until the 1960s that it saw a revival as a college sport, and it wasn't until the 1980s that the current trajectory of building it up as a major sport really started. Realistically, it's gonna take a while. We'll have peaks and troughs - and right now, we're probably in the deepest trough we've been in for a very long time. However, I'm confident the overall trend is upwards - it's just that I'm realistic about how long it might take.

    We're not the only team in this boat. Most of the world's nations have only recently started the game - and there's a reason why all the finalists ever for the Cup have come from the two regions with, by far, the most history.
     
  24. MarioKempes

    MarioKempes Member+

    Real Madrid, DC United
    Aug 3, 2000
    Raleigh, NC
    Club:
    Real Madrid
    Bob Bradley was given a huge opportunity and he fecked it up.
     
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  25. Marko72

    Marko72 Member+

    Aug 30, 2005
    New York
    That's DEBATABLE...

    (IMHO the real mistake he made was in taking the Swansea job at that point in time in the first place.)
     
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