3+1 Rule in K-League

Discussion in 'Korean Domestic Leagues' started by Koreano, Oct 30, 2008.

  1. Koreano

    Koreano Member

    Jul 5, 2005
    Club:
    Seongnam Ilhwa
    Nat'l Team:
    Korea Republic
    The AFC today announced that they will allow a fourth foreign player from the AFC to pariticipate in the upcoming ACL 2009. This means that K-League will have to adopt the same rule to maximize the benefits. However this brings a lot of concerns to the already tight domestic football market. As you know we lose hundreds of fine young players who avoid the K-League drafting system to play in Japan. This is just gonna worsen the situation as more and more players will go to Japan due to its proximity and money. At the same time, be prepared for our youngsters not get enough playing time due to the 4th foreign import. But nevertheless, overall this should be a better outcome in the longrun as it will heighten the competitiveness and attractiveness of the league.

    For sure the 4th AFC member player most clubs will go after midfielders as their finishing is not even on par with the domestic brazilians or koreans...

    What do you think? Comments?
     
  2. Golazo!!

    Golazo!! Red Card

    Jul 1, 2007
    If K-League was smart they would try to tap the other vast Asian Markets (Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia etc.) But they're not.
     
  3. GuruSky

    GuruSky Member

    Jan 7, 2004
    Club:
    FC Barcelona
    It all depends on how our clubs take advantage of the rule.

    Some top talents in Middle East definitely have the skills to succeed, but not many clubs would be able to afford them as a player like Yasser Al Qahtani gets paid just as well as average PL players.

    And while SE players could be marketable, most of them just aren't good enough.

    What the league needs to do is to have scouts in some of these Asian countries and look for youngins (preferably still in their teens) with a lot of potential. Or a player like Zheng Zhi of China would be excellent in K-League, but they'll need qualified scouts to get to work before Euro clubs get involved.
     
  4. AmoebaCulture

    AmoebaCulture Member+

    Nov 25, 2001
    Andromeda
    It is absolutely essential. I do not mind our youngsters going to the J.League (or even the J2) at a young age if they can snatch some game time. This is also consistent with my belief that the K-League must be quality first. If we can outsource youth development to Japan and import established quality Asian players, it is a win-win situation for us. Besides, it is cheaper to import an expensive mid-east player than it is to set-up a youth system.

    PS - I think the K-League should increase the number of foreign imports.
     
  5. druryfire

    druryfire Member

    Sep 10, 2007
    England
    Players from these nations just can't cut it. Very rarely would you get any player coming out of these countries to fill a position that a non-Korean guy could do.

    The only reason you would tap into this market is for money reasons, and thats not to conquer that nation for shirt sales, as this just doesn't happen but to save on wages.

    Any K-League side could through in there own youngsters over any South East Asian player. Only spots you might fill would be at full back. Even the nations you mention, bring in Africans as they can't get the homegrown players themselves to perfom.

    K-League and other nations such as Japan and Australia would be much better looking towards the Middle East, but then you go to nations who have money to throw at their players and then a big culture difference, before you know it they would be running home again.

    Japan has recently talked about giving a spot to players from emerging countries, but who can you really bring in from the likes of Afghanistan, Turkmenistan, Krygrzstan etc. Nobody, and if there really was anyone half decent, they would filter into Russia or Ukraine.

    None of it really makes sense, AFC should really try to get message across for teams to build on homegrown youth and use a 3+1 system for 3 foreign, more than likely Brazilians for attackers, or Eastern Europeans for defenders and 1 for a youth player under age 20 to be guranteed a starting berth.
     
  6. AmoebaCulture

    AmoebaCulture Member+

    Nov 25, 2001
    Andromeda
    Your idea is unproductive, ineffective, and shows promising signs of racism.

    It's unproductive because you are overlooking the economic returns for brining in South East Asians, such as television contracts and t-shirt sales. Its ineffective because your idea is no different from the K's current format with each team having an additional foreigner. Finally and quite frankly, to write-off SE Asians as inferior quality is no different from some European clubs writing-off Asians. Besides, there would've been no Cha Beom-guen or a Park Ji-sung.

    As an additional comment, I don't think you (including many others here) really understand why a team, or a country rather, needs to invest in a youth system.
     
  7. druryfire

    druryfire Member

    Sep 10, 2007
    England
    My point i'm trying to get across is to invest in youth systems. Why bring in some unknown from a sub standard league when you can invest in your very own. This is not a racist comment at all.

    Tell me how many players from these emerging countries actually make it?

    They might perfom well in their own league, but when it comes to playing in a fully professional league they stutter and stumble, before you know it they are thrown back to where they are from.

    V-League, you might be able to get a star out of there, since they throw money at you there, but these stars are not South East Asian, they are Brazilians and imported Africans.

    I can't quite see where you are going to get this 3+1, the only Asian you could bring in at this present moment would be from J League or A-League, but these leagues are more or less the same standard anyway.

    You wouldn't get players from the Arab Leagues because they are wealthy enough there and the culture is too different for them to go Far East.

    Again, the likes of Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan etc, there best players filter into the Soviet Leagues. So what do you have left, just youngster's aged beteen 18-22 who may or may not make it, but it's a big gamble to bring lads like that across.
     
  8. junjunforever

    junjunforever Member

    Feb 18, 2002
    I forgot his name, but there was a Thai player who did really in the Mid eighties, and the Iraqi player did well through the nineties. Agreed these are rare cases, but it is worth a try if K-league seeks to internationalize itself. More popular K-league teams become, more attention from AFC they will get, resulting in better prime-time television spots for Champions league fixtures and so on. Not that I care much about k-league, but the business aspect interests me greatly. I would definitely bring the promising good-looking players from south east asia if i was a club owner.

    I think it is best to go after players from Indonesia, India, Vietnam and Thailand. Countries with huge population and potential. Thai and Vietnam will work best, as many already have interest in Korea through dramas.
     
  9. druryfire

    druryfire Member

    Sep 10, 2007
    England
    Ok, current crop of Thai players who could make it at a higher level in Asia.

    Terratep Winothai - just signed for Lierse in Belgium, be interesting to see how he does there.

    The Sukha twins, Surat and Sukee would fill in gaps.

    After that you are talking strikers who can do a job in Thailand but not at a higher level consistently, therefore they might have a good spell but not hold down a regular space.

    One other name of mention would be Dataskorn Thonglao. But he is a player you would build a team around at a decent club at a team playing AFC Cup level, and he would just be a bit player at a Champions League challenging side.

    I'm sure many more could have a stab at a go, but wouldn't sustain the levels needed, certainly not now.

    But then i guess they need to be given the chance to prove themselves first. So, clubs should look to setup feeder links.

    Korean clubs should look at feeding into the Singapore S League with sides such as Super Reds (formaly Korean Super Reds), just likeJ-League side Albirex Niigata are doing.
     
  10. woorijim

    woorijim Member

    Sep 21, 2001
    Bucheon, South Korea
    Speaking of Super Reds, what's the story behind them? I once heard they were topping the S-league? All the players are Korean-born but their names I haven't even heard of. Probably, they are university drop-outs who were unable to make it to K-league, National league or K3 league.

    But it really surprises me how a team that consists of such players can top the S-league. I thought a few teams in S-league were doing pretty well in the AFC Cup. Is the standard that low in S-league say compared to V-league or Indonesian league?
     
  11. druryfire

    druryfire Member

    Sep 10, 2007
    England
    I think your correct, they were basically young lads who for whatever reason couldn't handle it in Korea. Their first season they struggled.

    This year they dropped the 'Korean' part to their name to open up to non Koreans, mainly just for fan base, but they have a few older lads in their, not sure of their names, but 30+ year olds who have more than likely played K League. They are doing well this year, but again, come towards the end of the season, the seasoned pro teams seem to have the measure on them.

    They do well in AFC Cup as they come up against teams from Hong Kong, Maldives and Malaysia of which no one can compare to them, but once they reach the latter stages and meet the West Asian sides, they tend to struggle and really get thumped.

    Thai teams have played in the Singapore Cup, and have done OK, Chonburi reaching the final in 2007, but generally it's a bit part tournement for trying out players more than sending a full strength squad.

    It's no surprise though, that the best players to come out of Singapore are British and Estern Europeans who fill the national team spots, but then what more do you expect from such a small nation?
     
  12. OPSK

    OPSK Member

    Jan 30, 2006
    I think there was similar discussion like very long time ago regarding this. This is back than when AFC had no intention or any idea to promote league's to do 3+1 system.

    There will be many one sided export to Japan from K-league because its financially stable and no draft cap for first year seems attractive to draftees in Korea who really cant find other option to make money (in this hard economy) if they are not drafted in to K-league clubs.

    Far as I know, Since Japan is willing to maximize their efficiency by drawing out Korean league players who are mostly capable and more likely to blend in well than someone who probably never been to Japan before (culture, food, distance etc), Korea should mirror that to replace domestic leaguer who are likely to go play for Japanese clubs.

    Incheon United acted quick to bring in Australian player into roster and if that makes a good precedent, than this system can benefit K-league. Instead of worrying about regression, clubs should act quickly to use this policy to bring favorable result both financially and in their performance. Excluding big clubs like SangAm, Suwon other K-league clubs should (and they probably are at the moment) use their resources to find suitable players from Australia, Central Asia and ASEAN regeion.

    I believe Australia will make splendid addition to roster given the fact that most Korean clubs can use physical defenders from reputable (but financially lacking or newly started ) league.

    Central Asia like Uzbek / china will be good asset too even though before 3+1 Korean clubs preferred Eastern Europe players with good proven experiance.

    ASEAN region, I belive some clubs are actually looking into finding 2nd Piapong (from Lucky Geomsung ...ex SangAm). However league style and infrastructer have very much changed since than therefore this will be difficult region to invent money into even though effect will be huge positive if clubs managed to find one.

    DRAWBACKS!!: clubs have their problem though, because most of K-league imports are either Brazilian or europeans, most clubs does not have sufficient contacts (scout, agents) associating or being familiar to different parts of Asia. Incheon United for example, since team launch, one structure that facinated me was their connection. It seemed they had good contacts in europe and was able to find Ladoncic or before that Wazalan from Turkey (I believe he did pretty decent in Incheon before we went Japan). However I do not recall most Korean clubs that have contact in those region, and establishing them will probably take some time. I asked my Thai friend, she told me lot of locals work as players agent, and there are lot of traffic from Thai -> V-league etc.

    This scarce lack of information might hit Korean clubs for this upcoming season unless they move quick if they really are going to take stake for 3+1 method.. which seems pretty attractive setting for success if well administered.

    IF K-league is going to keep the drafting, which is pretty much only obsticle to effective staffing of scouts (because there is no point in scouting if... players they invested since school...go another club during draft .. shit does happen).... maybe J-league export from young players will be attractive and bring more chances to 2nd tier players... It will probably take a long time to settle it though.

    Thus... i was pretty much rambling here... but in my opinion, if there is a smart club that wants to take adventage of this situation and at same time avoids being tackled by Kleague draft, it will most likely to be success story.

    I R Suwon fan,, but I respect how Incheon United runs their club, from bottom wide, up narrow.

    K-league president Kwak said something about strengthening U19 clubs... if that works out, maybe clubs will start to resist draftee because it was never beneficial for them and for players.

    Hope this 3+1 somehow works out well in Korea .. it'll do more goods than bad
     
  13. the_14th_redneck

    the_14th_redneck New Member

    Dec 20, 2008
    Club:
    --other--
    Nat'l Team:
    Andorra
    How about not being a vagina and just call it FC Seoul?
     
    chook90 repped this.
  14. OPSK

    OPSK Member

    Jan 30, 2006
    haha sorry cant do im used to call that team name as sang am no offense to their fans or anything my apology in advance if it offended / will offend you
     
  15. Bluewings

    Bluewings Member

    Jun 16, 2006
    hahaha, newbie sounds like a vagina. He must me an FC Seoul supporter:)
     
  16. the_14th_redneck

    the_14th_redneck New Member

    Dec 20, 2008
    Club:
    --other--
    Nat'l Team:
    Andorra
    Dude, I've been a member since 2004.
    I just can't open my old account.
     
  17. AmoebaCulture

    AmoebaCulture Member+

    Nov 25, 2001
    Andromeda
    I'm all for the Asian Quotas simply because I think the league needs more foreigners and it could be stepping stone for a more integrated marketing strategy across Asia. But it will do nothing to stop the K-League from being a feeder league to the J.
     
  18. the_14th_redneck

    the_14th_redneck New Member

    Dec 20, 2008
    Club:
    --other--
    Nat'l Team:
    Andorra
    If the K-League becomes a feeder to the J-League, that's because it's what it deserves.
    I think a different foreigner quota should be made for foreign players from other AFC countries.
    i.e., having 3 foreigner spots means you can actually sign 6 AFC players.
     
  19. Cha Bom

    Cha Bom New Member

    Dec 4, 2008
    I remember the Iraqi player. He played for the Pohang Steelers. The Iraqi player scored the winning goal in a penalty shoot out for an Asian league tournament. (Sorry, I forgot the exact name for that tournament). It was the game that made Pohang the champion of that tournament. But I was too young to remember the Thai player.

    In the mid 90s, Suwon had some international players too. They had Sasa from Yugoslavia and Denis(spelling?) from Russia. They had another guy from somewhere in eastern Europe (which I think was Romania. Sorry, this was a long time ago and I forgot). They were very good players and were quite popular with the fans. I heard the fans chant their names many times.

    All the good Korean teams have international players now, but the numbers are still low when compared to the western European teams.

    Unfortunately, I don't think the people of the international players' nationalities knew about them being in Korea. It might be different with SE Asian players because SE Asians are more interested in Korea.
     
  20. AmoebaCulture

    AmoebaCulture Member+

    Nov 25, 2001
    Andromeda
    You're talking about Jasim.
     
  21. AmoebaCulture

    AmoebaCulture Member+

    Nov 25, 2001
    Andromeda
    So it deserves to suffer because its their fault for Korea's weaker exchange rate per Japanese Yen?
     
  22. the_14th_redneck

    the_14th_redneck New Member

    Dec 20, 2008
    Club:
    --other--
    Nat'l Team:
    Andorra
    Yep. Let's get our crap together. Usually the trend goes beyond football. The language barrier is one thing that'll keep this under control. At the end of the day, if the players go to Japan and play better football it's good for the National Team anyway.
     
  23. hihi

    hihi Red Card

    Mar 17, 2006
    Internet
    Club:
    Ulsan Horang I
    Nat'l Team:
    Paraguay
    They don't genius.
     
  24. the_14th_redneck

    the_14th_redneck New Member

    Dec 20, 2008
    Club:
    --other--
    Nat'l Team:
    Andorra
    Then that's the way the cookie crumbles and we're just sh1t at football as usual.
     
  25. RickChelsea

    RickChelsea Member

    Sep 28, 2008
    sidknee
    Club:
    Chelsea FC
    Nat'l Team:
    Mozambique
    Incheaon (sp?) UTD took advantage of this already with Jade North IIRC? Would be nice if you lot could send some more Koreans down here like Song :>
     

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