The Wonderful World of Turns

Discussion in 'Coach' started by The Friendly Ghost, Feb 26, 2014.

  1. The Friendly Ghost

    The Friendly Ghost Member

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    I am working with a mixed group of girls (players from a U10 team and a U12 team) indoors and we've been focusing recently on turns. Anyone have any suggestions for games/activities to work on turns? And apart from inside/outside turns, drag back/step turns, L and V turns, Cruyff turns, and stepover turns, any other turns you think this age group should be exposed to?

    Here are the activities that I've used before (names are mine, you may call them something else):

    Warm-up dribble in defined space (on coach's command, player executes turn and accelerates outside of the space; can add a defender or two to make this game more competitive).

    Three-person dribble, turn and pass. Three players in a line (first one with a ball), first player dribbles out to line, turns, then passes to next player, who does same.

    "Suicides" (e.g., players dribble to first line, execute turn, return to start, execute turn, go to next line, execute turn, etc; can also make a relay race out of this).

    Four corners (two players in each corner, with big cone in middle, and a three cone slalom in each quarter quadrant; first player in each corner has ball and dribbles to big cone in middle, turns and dribbles through slalom, then next player goes; if you reverse the pattern--dribble through slalom and do turn, you can work on L turns).

    Three corners (three cones in an L shape; two players in each of the end corners; first player in line at one o the end cones has ball and dribbles to middle/right angle cone, first player in other line runs to that cone to put passive pressure on dribble, who executes L or V turn, and then passes to next person in line in the other corner, who receives, dribbles to middle cone and executes L or V turn and passes to oppossite corner).

    Mirror (three players, one is out, the other two are on opposite sides of a line, with cones on either end of the line. One player at line has ball and is dribbler, other player is passive defender. Player with ball, staying on his/her side of line, dribbles back and forth between the cones, executing turns of choice. Passive defender, staying on other side of line, is following dribbler back and forth. Play for 30 seconds to one minute and rotate).

    Mirror Race (same as above, except this time the person with the ball is tasked with dribbling past a cone before the defender can get past the cone; count number of wins in one minute, then rotate).

    1v1 Midfield Game (create a 1v1 field with a midfield line; player scores points by crossing MF (from either direction) with possession of ball. Idea of game is that after player crosses midfield, he wants to quickly cross over again, and will use turns to do so).


  2. rca2

    rca2 Member

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    I think the best dribbling game is 1v1 played to end lines (instead of to goals).
  3. dcole

    dcole Member+

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    You've hit the primary turning drills I've used. One thing I would suggest is that you explain and/or demonstrate the utility of a turn, and the different uses for the different turns, so they know why it's important to learn them and why it's important to explode out of them.
  4. Timbuck

    Timbuck Member

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    Turns in practice are one thing. Getting them to feel confident to try something new at game speed is the tough part.
    I like to use incentives for things done in games. At Girls u7 - Anyone that did a pull back in a game got $1.00 from me. Took them a few games, but it wound up costing me $20 by the 4th game.
    Now with my Girls U9s, I am trying to get them to do stepover turns, cruyff turns and scissors moves in games. Anyone that does this in a game for the first time gets a pair of rainbow shoelaces.

    A good practice is 1 v 1 drill with pugg goals (or small cone goals). The attacker can't shoot until they have performed a certain turn or move you are teaching. You can also start off with a "low pressure" defense (IE- they cannot tackle the ball until a move has been made. They can delay and try to slow the player down, but they can't go for the ball until the move has been made.)


  5. The Friendly Ghost

    The Friendly Ghost Member

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    Thanks. This is an important point. Try to place the skill in context. You don't want the player executing a pull back/drag back/step turn with a player on their back. Think about a stepover turn. You don't want a player doing an inside turn with their right foot when the defender is on the player's left. Use on outside turn with your right foot, or an inside turn with your left foot. Remember to use a turn that shields the ball. The mirror game is a great chance to remind players about context. My favorite is I asked the girls what's a good turn to use, as you are dribbling across the edge of penalty area, and the defender is slightly behind you (not even with your hips). I was proud of the fact that they quickly reached the conclusion that you don't turn, you take a big dribble and have a go at goal.
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
  6. The Friendly Ghost

    The Friendly Ghost Member

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    Good point, too. The above games, with the exception of the 1v1 game, are good for reinforcing the technique, but aren't particularly game-like. The 1v1 game you suggested is a good idea (I've done a variation on that when working on dribbling moves--if you do a scissors or step over or fake and take while in possession of the ball, and that possession of the ball results in a goal, the goal counts double) and I think I'll do it tomorrow (either in a 1v1 or 2v2 game).

    And it leads to the next question, which is how do you structure the game itself to promote turning. We always scrimmage for 25 minutes at the end of the session, and if anyone has an idea how to promote turning, let me know. The one thing I do is that we'll play for 8-10 minutes with regular rules, then for the next 8-10 minutes, I require the attacking team to cross MF at least twice (so that if the possession starts in the defensive end, the team must cross into the offensive half, then go back across, then cross again or take a long shot; if the possession starts in the offensive end, they need to go back across MF into the defensive end and then back into the offensive end), then for the last 8-10 minutes, we play regular rules again, but if you cross MF twice, any resulting goal counts triple. The crossing MF rule promotes turns.

    On a related note, on a stepover turn, do you coach your players to take the ball with outside of the foot you faked with, or with the inside/instep of the plant foot? My view is that the former is quicker, but the latter shields the ball better. I've pretty much just coached it as whatever is more comfortable for the player, but would welcome any thoughts as to one being consistently superior to the other.
  7. dcole

    dcole Member+

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    One way to get them to turn in game situations is for you to be the one who feeds a new ball into a SSG or scrimmage when the ball goes out of play. Roll a ball out in a way that requires a turn and tell them to use a turn to start play. Once they see how easy it is to use it in game conditions they should start doing it more on their own initiative.

    As for the stepover turn, it usually makes more sense to use the inside of the opposite foot for precisely the shielding reason you identified.
  8. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator Staff Member

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    Four outward facing PUGGs in approx 5x5 yard square.

    Coach plays boss of balls and starts play by playing ball in between the PUGGs.

    Divide group into two teams. Play 2v2 up to 4v4.

    Teams can score on any of the four goals.

    Because the goals are outward facing, they will need to use turns.

    Get_Dangerous.jpg
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2014
    lcstriker11 and rca2 repped this.
  9. OnlineSoccerCoaching

    OnlineSoccerCoaching New Member

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    Heres one we use for a little more 'real' pressure. Essentially 1v1 but the attacker has two targets. I always encourage my players to try and show off here a little bit, they always enjoy it and it helps when they can see the benefit of the turn. For example dribbling quickly towards one goal then turning back and losing the defender. Full session and coaching points here.
    onlinesoccercoaching.com/dribbling-to-targets-1v1.html

    Mark
    OSC
  10. de Kromme

    de Kromme Member

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    Only turn I'd add, and it's more of an enhanced turn, is the "twist-off" as Coerver would call it. Simply 2-3 consecutive inside or outside cuts that allows a player to put the defender on a "carousel" and come out of the turn headed back upfield (for example) with the defender now behind them. It's basically the "Xavi" turn.
  11. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator Staff Member

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    Another Coerver 1v1 staple is referred to as "Charlie's game".

    charlies_game.jpg

    B plays to Cone X and overlaps A and plays defense. A picks up ball and must dribble to cone (if not already there) before he attacks one of the two goals. Simple set up. Can be used with gates or PUGGs. When you hit the X then change of direction moves become relevant.

    Game is also useful for Stop and Start moves.
    Ihateusernames and rca2 repped this.
  12. Ihateusernames

    Ihateusernames Member

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    If you don't mind, I'd like to piggy back off of this. We've been working on the 1000 touch type stuff and terminology is not what I was used to so I had to youtube a few (the online guide's descriptions were useless since I'm visual). I have a drag-back and a pull-back. Everything online indicates they are the same. The descriptions don't say anything different than dribble with L, pull with L or dribble with L, pull with R. Am I seriously overcomplicating this? Turns are really the biggest issue we have with execution and I am afraid it's because I am confused on the terminology. I am trying to stick to it for consistency if they youtube something, but it would sometimes be easier to teach what I know as I know it - which in my case, usually doesn't have a name.
  13. rca2

    rca2 Member

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    This is Dennis Mueller's 1000 touches handout. There is no universal terminology, which is why he has to define each term he uses.
    http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~dgraham/daily_drill.html
    Since I don't see any mention of a drag-back there, I suspect that you are using other people's terminology.

    I share your frustration. I don't even like the idea of coaching formally defined moves. It is like teaching students to write poetry by giving them stock lines to assemble into verses. No creativity. No flexibility. Dribbling should be taught as words and sounds to create lines of poetry. That is what I value about the Coerver method, which starts with the pieces that are the foundation of dribbling.

    For all the names for dribbling moves coaches throw around, I have never heard a player talk like that in a game. Most players only use 3-5 moves regularly in games, so why should we force predictabilily on the game by teaching everyone the same 3-5 dribbling moves?

    Remember that originally the Coerver method was used to improve dribbling skills in kids who had already been playing unorganized soccer and dribbling for years. I bet half the U-Littles I coached had not played any unorganized soccer. I was literally starting with: "This is a soccer ball. The object is to score more goals than the other team."
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2014
  14. GKbenji

    GKbenji Member

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    Agree. I always use the example of Lionel Messi. He doesn't have any named "moves" per se. Just quick changes of direction and body fakes to get defenders off balance, then an explosive touch to the space. "Keep it simple, do it quickly." is my manta.

    Oh, and also "I like simple moves. You know why? Because even I can do them." :)
    Ihateusernames and rca2 repped this.
  15. nicklaino

    nicklaino Member

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    On moves with a players name attached to them. Most of those moves we're being done before that player came a long. But then a name player starts to use them he does that move very well and he does that move often. Then someone names that move after them and presto you have a legend :)

    When a player finds a good move to help him beat the first defender and he is successful using it. He will use it all the time. Maybe he will use it too much that is why you want him to learn 2 or three other moves that he can start with either foot.

    Plus you have the pull back I wonder if that was invented by a player named Pull who was a back :). Then full scissors to get you more time also invented by the great player Full. You can use a half scissor to beat people.

    Also I feel every player should have a change of direction move where you don't need help from another player to do it. Like the cryuff probably some other player did it before him.

    I think Donadoni turned it also into a shot. Maybe they should call that the cryuff/Donadoni move. :)
    rca2 repped this.
  16. GKbenji

    GKbenji Member

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    The spin-turn or "roulette" is called a Garrincha, Maradonna or Zidane, depending on how old you are. ;-)
  17. Ihateusernames

    Ihateusernames Member

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    It's that one combined with another because a few on there were...I felt they were ill-defined, pointless, or wonky. It will probably be one of those things I tweak over the years. I just kinda add and delete as I see necessary. The girls love it and it gets them moving at home. Here's the other one I combined with http://www.walsh.edu/pdf/1000TouchDrills.pdf

    I've not experienced the Coever stuff so I can't attest to it. I find most of these things in the list give them basic touches. It breaks it down to the simplest form and then the players can do with it as they wish.

    Yes, and turns. I saw a few at practice today. It was nice to finally see futsal pay off. The girls were comfortable enough with the ball to slow it down and turn away from pressure to find open teammates. I saw quite a few good cuts and turns to create space. One girl even did it to let all the defenders run by her and slip a ball in while their backs were turned. Smart cookie that one.
  18. elessar78

    elessar78 Moderator Staff Member

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    This is what I thought a Garrincha was . . . at the 25 second mark:

    It'd be funny after two decades with that move to learn it was something else. :D And by no means am I saying I'm right.

    It's one of my favorite moves, although I do a moving variation where I run past the ball, hard jab step, then come back to to cut inside.
  19. rca2

    rca2 Member

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    I agree the Walsh description of a drag back turn makes no sense at all.

    "Drag Back - Push ball forward with one foot and pull it back with the same
    foot while turning toward (and with) the ball. As you complete your turn,
    drop your foot from the top of the ball and take the ball in the opposite
    direction
    with the inside of the drag-back foot."

    The opposite of the turn would be back to the original direction, especially if you use the inside of the same foot. My best guess is that he is doing a bad job of describing a Vee turn.
    Ihateusernames repped this.
  20. Ihateusernames

    Ihateusernames Member

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    I feel less stupid now. Thanks.

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