Getting in awesome ref shape

Discussion in 'Referee' started by arsenal8884, Jan 3, 2013.

  1. arsenal8884

    arsenal8884 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2012
    Club:
    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    United States
    As we enter a new year it is always nice to set goals for yourself both on and off the pitch. In 2012 I acheived a pretty good level of fitness but am currently looking to push it to the next level. I generally lift/cross train 3x a weeka dn do my fair share of running. At the end of my summer (peak fitness) I was scoring 4-5 on all of the NISOA physical fitness tests. However I know that I can get better for the mere fact that running miles is NOTHING like the intermitant sprinting done in a game

    I remember an interview with some pro refs where they said that USSF sends them a program that they do with their Heart Rate Monitor watch (which I have). I was wondering if anybody on the forum trains this way? and where they got this program ?

    If they could post any links or advice towards achieving an upper level of referee specific fitness it would be greatly appreciated.
    dadman repped this.


  2. BlackBart

    BlackBart Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    My personal training regiment is being updated due to the demise of Twinkies (RIP).
  3. Law5

    Law5 Member+

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2005
    Location:
    Beaverton OR
    I don't know about USSF having a training program. FIFA sends my daughter a workout program from a fitness trainer in Germany that goes to all of the FIFA referees and assistant referees. I don't have it but it is not a trade secret or anything.

    For many years, I have followed a training program for National Referees that Bob Evans created.

    Referee Training Program



    Note:

    Always warm up and stretch before beginning each day’s training

    Be sure you have liquids available during and after training.

    If you are unable to complete the schedule on any day, slow down or take longer intervals between events.

    On the days not listed, either rest, have a light workout or do weight work. Day 6 should always be a rest day.

    If you find this too easy, it’s okay to start farther down the schedule. If you get to the end, you can either add more reps or more speed, or both.



    Abbreviations:

    M = meters

    m = minutes

    s = seconds

    I = interval between events

    4-1 means week 4, day 1, etc.

    < = less than



    Week
    Day 1
    Day 3
    Day 5
    Day 7
    1
    1.5 miles
    10 – 12 m
    2 miles
    15 – 16 m
    2 miles
    14 – 15 m
    2.5 miles
    20 m
    2
    3 x 800 M
    4 m, I = 3 m
    4 x 800 M
    4 m, I = 3 m
    4 x 800 M
    3.5 m, I=3 m
    3 miles
    24 – 26 m
    3
    4 x 800 M
    3.5 m, I = 3 m
    1 mile, 7-8 m
    2 x 800 M, 3.5 m, I = 3-4 m
    same as 3-3
    3 miles
    24 –26 m
    4
    3 x 800 M, 3.5 m, I=3,
    2 x 400 M, 90s I=3-4 m
    same as 4-1
    2 x 800 M, 3.5 m, I=3 m
    3 x 400 M, 90s, I=3-4 m
    3 miles
    <24 m

    5
    1 mile 7.5 m I=4 m,
    2 x 400 M 85s I=3-4 m
    same as 5-1
    1 mile 7.5 m
    I=4 m,
    3 x 400 M 85s
    I= 3-4 m
    3 miles
    <24 m

    6
    1 mile 7.5 m I=4 m
    4 x 400 M 85s
    I=3-4 m
    same as 6-1
    5 x 400 M 85s
    I=3 m
    3.5 miles
    28 m
    7
    5 x 400 M <85 s, I=3 m
    same as 7-1
    6 x 400 M 85s
    I=3 m
    3.5 miles
    28 m
    8
    4 x 400 M <85s
    2 x 200 M <40s I=3 m
    same as 8-1
    4 x 400 M, <85 s
    4 x 200 M,
    <40 s, I=3 m
    3.5 miles
    <28 m
    9
    4 x 400 M, <85 s
    2 x 200 M,
    <40 s
    2 x 100 M,
    <18 s, I=3 m
    same as 9-1
    4 x 400 M, <85 s
    3 x 200 M, <40 s
    3 x 100 M,
    <18 s, I=3 m
    3 miles
    24 m
    10
    4 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    I = 3 m
    jog .5 mile
    same as 10-1
    4 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 100 M 18s
    I=3 m
    jog .5 mile
    3 miles
    24 m
    11
    1 x 400M 80s
    2 x 200M 35s
    I=3 m, rest 5-7 m, 1 mile 8 m
    same as 11-1
    2 x 400M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    I=3 m, rest 5-7 m, 1 mile 8 m
    3 miles
    24 m
    12
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    I=3 m, rest 5-7 m, 1 mile, 8 m
    same as 12-1
    2 x 400M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    I=3 m, rest 5-7 m, 1.5 miles 12 m
    3 miles
    <24 m
    13
    2 x 400M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    I=3 m, rest 5 m, 2 miles, 16 m
    same as 13-1
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 50 M, I=3 m, rest 5 m
    1 mile 8 m
    3 miles
    <24 m
    8 x 10 shuttle
    <28 s
    14
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 50 M
    I=3 m, rest 5m
    1.5 miles <12 m
    same as 14-1
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 50 M
    I=3 m, rest 5m
    2 miles <16 m
    3 miles
    <24 m
    8 x 10 shuttle
    <28 s
    15
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 50 M, I=3 m, rest 5 m
    1 mile 7 m
    same as 15-1
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 50 M
    I=3 m, rest 5m
    1.5 miles 11m
    3 miles
    <24 m
    8 x 10 shuttle
    <28 s
    16
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 50 M
    I=3 m, rest 5m
    2 miles 14 m
    same as 16-1
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 50 M
    I=3 m, rest 5m
    2.5 miles <20 m
    3 miles
    <24 m
    8 x 10 shuttle
    <28 s
    17
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 50 M
    I=3 m, rest 5m
    2.5 miles 18 m
    same as 17-1
    2 x 400 M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35s
    2 x 50 M
    I=3 m, rest 5m
    3 miles 24 m
    3 miles
    <24 m
    8 x 10 shuttle
    <26 s
    18
    repeat 17-1 all week



    19
    2 miles 14 m
    rest 5-7 m
    4 x 400M 80s
    2 x 200 M 35 s, I =3 m
    same as 19-1
    2 miles 14 m
    rest 5-7 m
    4 x 400M 80s
    2 x 200M 35s 2 x 100M 18s, I =3 m
    3 miles
    <24 m
    8 x 10 shuttle
    <26 s
    20
    repeat 19-1 all week



    21
    3 miles 22 m
    rest 5-7 m
    2 x 200 M 35s 2 x 100 M 18s
    2 x 50 M 9 s
    I =3 m
    same as 21-1
    3 miles 22 m
    rest 5-7 m
    2 x 200 M 35s 4 x 100 M 18s
    2 x 50 M 9 s
    I =3 m
    3 miles
    <24 m
    8 x 10 shuttle
    24 s
    22
    3 miles 22 m
    rest 5 m
    6 x 100 M 18s
    2 x 50M 9 s
    I=3 m
    same as 22-1
    same as 22-1
    3 miles
    <24 m
    8 x 10 shuttle
    24 s
    23
    alternate 21-3 and 17-3



    24
    your choice, practice fitness test is suggested





    My twist on this is that I do a fitness class three days a week, which includes cardio, weights and weight like training, with stretching at the end. I am in a cold climate this time of year, so I do my running on an indoor track. This morning, for example, I was on 6-5.
    dadman repped this.
  4. JimEWrld

    JimEWrld Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    I just started working through the FIFA plan, we'll see how it goes. I have heard good things from the other guys I am working with.


  5. arsenal8884

    arsenal8884 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2012
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    Arsenal FC
    Country:
    United States
    JimEWrld,

    could provide a link or point me in the direction of finding this plan?
  6. JimEWrld

    JimEWrld Member

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    Jun 20, 2012
    Club:
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    camconcay repped this.
  7. soccerman771

    soccerman771 Member

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    Jul 16, 2011
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas area
    Club:
    FC Schalke 04
    Country:
    United States
    This topic would be a great thing for PRO to develop at all levels and standardize for referees of all grades.
    SA14mars repped this.
  8. bothways

    bothways Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2009
    JimEWrld- do you belong to the Chicago referee soccer club- I think they posted something on there about training.
  9. Paper.St.Soap.Co

    Paper.St.Soap.Co Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    With the benefit of a heart rate monitor you can mix in a few interval workouts. I personally found that interval training is fantastic for what we do as referees and is much better than just getting out there for a long run (although this is necessary, too, to some extent). Law5 provided some examples for interval training and I've seen some stuff out there for UEFA referees as well but, since you heart rate monitor, you can build your own workouts.

    First thing you need to do is figure out what your max heart rate is. The rough formulas you can find on the web are okay, but I would suggest using this process to calculate it for yourself. Once you have that, play around with different distance/times at 85-90% max HR with recovery in between. My general rule of thumb is to get my HR to drop to 75% max during my recovery. The cool thing is the numbers don't lie -- you know exactly how hard you are working. Also, recovery is import and you can make sure that you are getting proper recovery. HR not dropping far enough? Recover jog/walk a little longer. You'll also see your results pay off by being able to drop your HR quicker as you get in better shape. This, for me, was the big goal during matches. Lower HR means your focus can be on making decisions rather than getting blood to your legs.

    Note that I'm not a professional, so official training documents will carry more weight...
  10. JimEWrld

    JimEWrld Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2012
    Club:
    Chicago Fire
    Yes, this was the training I refereed to. I would link the site, but it dosn't have specific exercises, just the general structure, but why not:

    Here is the CSRC training website. Not the greatest for specifics exercises but it does outline a plan:
    http://www.csrcref.org/?q=node/62

    If you are an Illinois referee, try and make it out if you can.
    dadman repped this.
  11. bluedevils

    bluedevils Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2002
    Location:
    USA
    A few random comments/questions:

    There are countless different approaches to fitness training. Some feel that training beyond the normal bounds of competition or game-day activity is prudent; some don't. One of our FIFA ARs feels there's no reason to ever run more than 3-4 miles in a training session. In contrast, other referees put in much longer training sessions. YMMV.

    Law5, do you know if that program from Bob Evans is on the web anywhere else? It came through fairly tough to read in your post on this thread.

    PSRA has plenty of good fitness training materials on its website (refereeassociation.net), which JimEWrld linked above.

    Heart rate monitoring is a key component and very valuable training aid. Good advice above from Paper.St.Soap.Co. Another useful aspect of this is resting heart rate. As your fitness improves, resting heart rate also should improve.

    Interesting link to runnersworld.com article on determining your true max heart rate, but I didn't exactly understand it. Is the idea simply to reach an all-out level of exertion and see what your heart rate is?

    "At a track, do a warmup mile or two, followed by a mile at tempo pace, then gradually increase your speed over 400 meters before running a final quarter all out. "After every 100 meters during the last 400, look at your monitor and accelerate," says Atlanta-based coach Roy Benson. The highest number on your monitor will be close to your maximum heart rate.

    To me, running 400 meters 'all-out' means giving 100% effort during the entire 400 meter distance. I would expect most people to reach just about as high a heart rate as their body can produce by running 400 meters as hard as they can. But it didn't make sense that the article said to accelerate every 100 meters while running the 400 meters all-out. If you are running all-out, aren't you already going as fast as you can and therefore you cannot accelerate?

    I've long wondered what 'maximum heart rate' really means. Is it theoretical, or meant to be an actual prediction of the maximum heart rate my body can reach? For example: if the formulas say my max should be 180, but I regularly peak at 195 while refereeing and 200 while training hard -- am I exceeding my theoretical max heart rate when it hits 200, or does this indicate that my max is actually at or above 200?
  12. Paper.St.Soap.Co

    Paper.St.Soap.Co Member+

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2010
    Max HR in this context is the max HR reaching during physical exercise -- not necessarily truly the highest your HR can go, per say.

    The article was a little confusing, but the main point was the work up to your max exertion gradually to ensure an accurate Max HR reading. The points you bring up about the formulas and being able to hit higher rate while working out prove that they really are just estimates. I'm sure for my age I was besting my "max HR" last night at spin class for at least ten minutes on those hills!
  13. Law5

    Law5 Member+

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2005
    Location:
    Beaverton OR
    I don't know about the Bob Evans plan being on the web some place. I have it in Word and paper form. Yes, what I posted is hard to read. Basically, it sets a series of runs for each workout day, with time standards for each run. One of the things I like is that it gets progressively harder and then drops you down a bit, building up again to an even higher level and so on. My approach is that, if I don't hit the time standard for every run, I repeat the work out the next time. If I fail the second time, I move on to the next work out, however. My other operating practice is that I only look at the time given. E.g. if it says 400 meters in 85 seconds, I treat any time under 86 as passing, even if my watch says 85.99. I do throw in upper body work after I complete the day's runs. My fitness class has been a valuable addition, on the days without runs.

    I will add that the most important thing is that your workout has to work for your personal schedule. I used to run in the evening, after work, but I found that there were too many times that I had conflicts. Eventually, I just decided that I had to make the sacrifice to run before work. No matter what training you plan to do, it won't help if you don't find a way to actually do it!
  14. Wahoos1

    Wahoos1 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2004
    For me simple is better.

    3 weeks prior to games I hit the local 400 meter track and do intervals.

    Run 150 meters in 35 seconds and walk 50 meters in 30 seconds. Repeat until I have worked up to 2 miles.

    In season I just jog/weights for the days between games.

    The above put this 50 year old guy into 6-7 miles of movement for games and keeping up with fast breaks and upgrading to the State Badge.

    Offseason is nothing but treadmill, rowing machine and weights.
  15. techguy9707

    techguy9707 Member

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    Location:
    Antelope, CA
    Kari Seitz (sp?) mentioned the FIFA training programs in her interview that was posted at the NorCal . I think it was posted here also but I am not sure. if I can find the link, I will post it. If I remember correctly, the AR with her mentioned the AR programs were different from the CR.
    dadman repped this.
  16. Pierre Head

    Pierre Head Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2005
    and to Bluedevils
    This training plan is also available in the book by Evans & Bellion. They apparently adapted it for themselves from a systematic training method originally published by an Olympics-level track coach, and put it out for National referees to use. All the details are in the E&B book.

    PH
  17. Pierre Head

    Pierre Head Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2005
    FWIW, a 400 meter run used to be included in the FIFA/US National referee fitness test. The time was 75 secs, not too demanding, but it was eventually dropped because a lot of refs complained about it. It was replaced by 2 x 200 meters in 35 secs each.

    A general rule for Max HR used to be "220-age" although a well-trained person can exceed this
    by a few points. I think it has been modified somewhat but it can still be used as a decent guide for
    doing runs at various % of maxHR, eg 80% max HR.

    PH
  18. andymoss

    andymoss BigSoccer Supporter

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  19. uniqueconstraint

    uniqueconstraint Member

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    My fitness regimen, given my decreased running out of soccer season, is to drop to 3 glasses of scotch a night instead of...well, more than 3 ;)
  20. bluedevils

    bluedevils Member

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    As fitness improves, your max heart rate drops. Interesting, never heard that before.
  21. arsenal8884

    arsenal8884 Member

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    Thanks for the info guys,

    Law 5 - The Bob Evans Plan looks pretty legit. The drops in intensity are a huge factor in program efficacy in my opinion. I used to do some powerlifting in college and it wasn't until I started incorporating a similar approach that I saw great results. In terms of scheduling and having a plan that matches with your goals and lifestyle.... I could not agree with you more. If a plan doesn't work for you you will not work at it bottom line.

    Jim - Thanks for the links, Im still young at this so I have to keep searching for the best info out there. A good variety of programs. I like the FIFA cycle info as well. My only hinderance is the issue of space. I think that what makes this plan so good is also it's major flaw in terms of being used for non-pro referees. The drills done a field are most likely some of the best exercise you can do to improve your referee fitness. That being said it isn't always easy to find field access before or after work (yet alone in January in ENY). At the very least I will use the drills when it gets warmer out.

    soccerman - I think we would increase the overall level of referee fitness if programs like this were readily available. Making a program that will show direct benefits i would encourage more referees to take fitness more seriously.

    Wahoos - This is basically what I did on a weekly basis during a 2 month period during the summer. I got in really good shape doing it. WNY posted an audio file on their website. I just downloaded it onto my iPod and did the run. it works pretty well. Also, the Rower is great and is a machine that is not used to its potential. I used it a lot duing HS in the fall weekdays. You can get your HR up and have a great workout in 20-30min without totally killing your legs.

    techguy - That was the video that sparked my initial question! I have a HRM watch and it can be used to great effect when used properly. And yes the ARs do have a different program. One of the ARs in the video said that she regularly works with a sprint coach in addition to her normal training. I bet you she isn't endlessly doing miles

    Pierre/ Andy - My understanding of HRM is basically in line with what you guys noted.

    Group,

    Two things that helped me greatly in my training were.
    1. incorporating a basic Yoga program (you can find tons on youtube if you don't have the cash/ time to go to classes. I found that I stretched better and that my mechanics were a lot crisper (holding a muscle in a required position under fatigue and strain)

    2. The Prowler sled. I saw it used with a couple of cross fitters I know. This thing did wonders for my explosively and push off during sprints. It is a pricey piece of equipment, but if you fitness center has one, it is worth giving it a try in my opinion
    soccerman771 and dadman repped this.
  22. techguy9707

    techguy9707 Member

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    IIRC, the programs the FIFA referees get was like an Ipod song/program that told what to do, how long to do it and when to go onto the next portion of the program. This sounded very effective in that you simply responded to the "commands" on the program, much like we "respond" to the condition in the game.

    Maybe this was all in my head and just my idea of how it could be done and not require me to have a piece of paper to tell me what to do... and when.
  23. bothways

    bothways Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2009
    wouldn't there be an app, or something we could download to our phones and use in a workout?
    i know there is one for basic people trying to get fit, called couch to something or other...
  24. arsenal8884

    arsenal8884 Member

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    I think you are refereeing to couch to 5k/ 10k. Both are pretty good plans/ apps but are specifically designed with that in mind; getting you off the couch to run a 5k/ 10k.
  25. bothways

    bothways Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2009
    what i was trying to say was something that would be tailored to referees, etc(like what the fifa guys apparently get)- something for us common folk!

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