Football Strength Training

Discussion in 'Player' started by Impossible6, Feb 9, 2013.

  1. Impossible6

    Impossible6 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2011
    Location:
    Australia
    Club:
    Central Coast Mariners
    I want to start doing strength training for two purposes: Injury prevention and Power/Stability. What kind of reps should I be looking for to prevent injury? Just your basic 10 reps 3 sets? The predicament here is that training for power involves 1 - 5 reps, so they kind of cross wires.

    Now for the power training: Do I have to be in the gym for this? I don't have enough money to be paying for a personal trainer to spot me while I'm lifting massive ammounts of weight. Plus it just seems like a hassel to have 3 spots around me while I'm trying to squat up an Olympic barbell for 3 reps. Can I just do plymotetrics? Or do I really want to be reaping the benefits of heavy lifting/power training.

    Also, I want to place a high emphasis on core work. What kind of exercises/reps do I want to increase my stability around my core: To fend of challenges, keeping stable while a 6'4 centre-half is jostling me for the ball. I have a build like David Silva, Iniesta etc. and my game doesn't evolve around supreme athleticism, just quick feet, acceleration and agility. And of course, my brain.


  2. Soccerfan010

    Soccerfan010 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    The spotter problem is something I have been wondering about myself. How safe is it to lift heavy weights without a spotter?
  3. dejansavicevic10

    dejansavicevic10 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Club:
    Chelsea FC
    Country:
    Nigeria
    It is nice if you have a spotter, but if you are going to lift heavy weights by yourself, I would recommend you use a rack with pins you can let go, if absolutely necessary.
  4. Elbullio

    Elbullio Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2010
    To be honest, the best time ive ever spent in inury prevention was a Pilates class. No BS, that thing just works. Works your core, stability and flexibility. Extremely effective full body workout.


  5. JonIsAnOwl

    JonIsAnOwl Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Location:
    England
    Club:
    Sheffield Wednesday FC
    Country:
    England
    Think people should stop worrying about 'lifting heavy weight'.

    Just do the basics and improve your footballing ability. All these kids coming through and making it professional aren't in the gym all day lifting massive amounts of weight.

    In fact, the vast majority of their gym work is basic strength training, followed by core work and maybe using a little bit of free weights to improve their muscular endurance.
  6. Elbullio

    Elbullio Member

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2010
    First and foremost, the goal should be to keep injury free.

    IF you are extremely serious about your football, have a session with a physio and tell them what you want to improve, and they can give you advice.

    Otherwise, have a look at FourFourTwo's performance section: http://performance.fourfourtwo.com/fitness
  7. Soccerfan010

    Soccerfan010 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    It certainly doesn't hurt to get a little bigger though.
  8. JonIsAnOwl

    JonIsAnOwl Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2011
    Location:
    England
    Club:
    Sheffield Wednesday FC
    Country:
    England
    Sure. But you don't need to lift huge weights, especially at a young age, to get bigger.
  9. ejgrownarseman

    ejgrownarseman Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2012
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Country:
    United States
    For squats, use a smith machine and you don't need a spotter. I use dumbells for bench so that also eliminates the need for a spotter.
  10. rca2

    rca2 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    Oh yes it does. "Bigger" is not stronger. Appearance and strength are two different things. "Bigger," as in more mass, has performance costs and no benefits.

    Any type of training will help novice athletes increase performance, but the more advanced the athlete the more an individual assessment and training plan is needed to have a significant performance gain.
  11. rca2

    rca2 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    You should be lifting under supervision of a knowledgeable person.
    The danger is not in the amount of weight--the risk is fatigue or injury when the weights are above you. A young person even in their early 20's can pull their back during a routine lift. No matter how strong or experienced you are, there is always risk in lifting to exhaustion.
  12. ejgrownarseman

    ejgrownarseman Member

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    Seattle Sounders
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    United States
    Bigger, to a point, is better much of the time. Of course it can't make up for technical ability or soccer IQ but more mass is usually a good thing (again...within reason).;
  13. Soccerfan010

    Soccerfan010 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    This was what I meant. It doesn't hurt to put on some mass if you are constantly being pushed off the ball, or if you could benefit from putting on a few more pounds. And when I said bigger I didn't mean go put on a couple pounds of fat.
  14. rca2

    rca2 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    Appearance means nothing. More mass is a disadvantage. If you have more mass, it takes more energy to make the same movements. It also takes more power to make the same movements at the same rate.

    In American football and hockey more mass helps, because when you hit another player, more mass means you hit with more energy. But you are not allowed to hit players in soccer.
  15. Soccerfan010

    Soccerfan010 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2013
    In that case being as skinny as possible would be a huge advantage, which is not true. Bigger muscles (up to a point) can benefit you in ways such as increasing your speed or helping your stability.
    ejgrownarseman repped this.
  16. ejgrownarseman

    ejgrownarseman Member

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    Jul 19, 2012
    Club:
    Seattle Sounders
    Country:
    United States
    You're forgetting one very major aspect: we are talking about working muscle, not dead weight. That mass isn't just something extra you have to carry around. It also helps you move and move more explosively. Secondly, soccer is absolutely a contact sport and if you've been playing it other wise you've been playing it wrong. Winning balls in the air, fighting for position on set pieces, holding opposing players off the ball, winning the ball off block tackles...strength and mass most definitely matter in those situations.

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