cool quiz

Discussion in 'Referee' started by bothways, Jan 14, 2013.

  1. bothways

    bothways Member

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  2. jayhonk

    jayhonk Member

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    The gods of soccer, or IFAB, which ever are more open to suggestion, should really, really, really fix this one. Nobody calls it this way.

    8 A goalkeeper deliberately parries a shot and the ball falls at his feet. He dribbles the ball slowly towards the edge of his area. An attacker runs towards him, so the keeper picks up the ball.a) That's fine, as long as the whole process takes only six seconds b) Once he has picked up the ball he can keep hold of it for six seconds c) Once he has picked up the ball you should award an indirect free-kick against him d) Once he has picked up the ball you should award a penalty against him.
  3. socal lurker

    socal lurker Member+

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    Keep in mind that "parry" is not the same thing as "saved" but in this sense really means "controlled the ball with the hands by carefully directing the ball to the ground when it could just as easily have been caught" -- I don't recall seeing a GK do that for a long time. And I've never (well, since that was part of the LOTG) seen anything I would consider a parry in a game I was calling. (The problem with the quiz question, IMHO, is that parry in this sense is a term of art, and putting it into a question like that without an understanding of how the word is being used will give the wrong impression of what it means.)
  4. Yale

    Yale Member

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    And the reason nobody does it anymore is because it was decided that a parry constitutes control, so you might as well catch the ball. Before that determination was made, parrying the ball provided a tactical advantage, as it let the keeper do exactly what the question was describing.
    dadman repped this.


  5. R.U. Kiddingme

    R.U. Kiddingme Member

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    And...if I did see this happen, the first time, I would let the keeper know that is illegal and give a warning the first time.
    I've never called the 6 sec rule either because they always heed my advice when given a warning.
    Both rules are designed to stop time wasting and if I can manage to prevent that while keeping the game moving, so much the better.
  6. R.U. Kiddingme

    R.U. Kiddingme Member

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    I once made an impeding call and announced "impeding" as I pointed for the restart.
    Overheard a comment from the touchline say, "it's called obstruction, he must be new."
    IllinoisRef, dadman, nsa and 1 other person repped this.
  7. socal lurker

    socal lurker Member+

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    Exactly.
  8. sjquakes08

    sjquakes08 Member+

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    Some of these have multiple answers that are right. For example, if I wanna say to myself "Cool, I can still jog" I damn well can.

    Obviously more of a joke quiz than a real quiz, though I didn't know the thing about the English version being final. Also got the one about the shoe coming off wrong. Learn something new every day!
  9. refontherun

    refontherun Member

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    We've all seen where a keeper will parry the hard shot straight down to take some speed off, and then grab it on the bounce. It was obviously a controlled action, but nothing more than bouncing the ball. To parry a hard shot to your feet and control it would be difficult at best. I think what the quiz may be referring to is a ball that could have been controlled with the chest of thigh rather than the hands, and the keeper chose to use his hands anyway.
  10. socal lurker

    socal lurker Member+

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    ???

    I would suggest that the quiz is using "parry" exactly as it is used in the I&G (pg 114):

    Unfortunately, however, the word is hardly self-illuminating in understanding when it would apply.

    As ATR 12.19 points out, the use of "parry" is focused on control:

    I think what you described was a "save" not a "parry." I really don't think parry is that complicated when contemplated in context (which the quiz doesn't address) of the Law, which is double possession -- when the GK deflected the ball, did the GK exhibit the same kind of control and possession as he would by catching the ball? If he did, it's a parry; if he did not, it's a save and he can pick up the ball.

    This is akin to circumvention in that it attempts to close an otherwise existing loophole -- if it's not obvious then there's nothing there. But I don't think could have been controlled by chest or thigh is useful as a test.
  11. GKbenji

    GKbenji Member

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    That's because the four step rule got removed in favor of six seconds. Back when dinosaurs roamed the earth and I started playing goalkeeper, the deliberate parry was a way to circumvent the four steps.... if you thought it was safe, you'd bat the ball ("parry" it) out towards the edge of the penalty area, then run out there and pick it up, being almost 18 yards from the goal line instead of just 4-5.

    The restriction was put in place to prevent that. It wasn't really a time-wasting thing, as the original question implies.

    Removing the four step limit made this unnecessary (which is why you almost never see it any more), but the old restriction and verbiage are still around.
    Dayton Ref repped this.
  12. Chas (Psyatika)

    Chas (Psyatika) Member

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    Perhaps i can shed some light on this situation.

    par·ry /ˈparē/
    Verb
    Ward off (a weapon or attack), esp. with a countermove.
    Noun
    An act of warding off a blow.
    Synonyms
    repel - fend off - repulse - ward off - fend - evade

    So if the goalkeeper successfully wards off the ball as if he were being attacked with a bullet, or manages to evade the shot entirely (as in a game of dodgeball), this is to be considered a parry, which constitutes possession.

    If you're still having doubts, remember that it is specifically noted in the LOTG that the English language is authoritative. And there is no better authority on the English language than a dictionary.
    Problem solved. You're welcome. [​IMG]
  13. socal lurker

    socal lurker Member+

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    Your image doesn't show on my computer -- I'm assuming that this was a joke, but in case anyone were to take it seriously, I'll pretend of a moment it was serious. Trying to use a dictionary to define a term of art in a sport is, well, useless. There's a reason the ATR specifically differentiates parry and save. If you call it that way in a game, you're going to get roasted. This is a great situation to apply Law 18 -- was the deflection by the keeper the equivalent of possession? If so, it's a parry and he can't pick it back up; if not, then it is a save, and he can pick it up.

    (I'd forgotten when the parry rule came in -- I assume GKBenji is right about the timing, which was when I was away from reffing. Back when I was a dinosaur roaming the penalty area in a spiderman shirt (and when I started reffing), the version of the four step rule allowed the GK to put the ball down and pick it back up -- each time it was rolled or bounced counted as one step. For those who missed it, pause for a moment and you can picture the u10 and u12 keepers rolling the ball and trying to evade opponents to get the ball to the top of the PA for a punt . . . took a lot longer than 6 seconds . . . .)
  14. Chas (Psyatika)

    Chas (Psyatika) Member

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    What gave it away, the part where i stated that dodging the ball counts as parrying it?
  15. socal lurker

    socal lurker Member+

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    People took Jonathon Swift seriously . . .

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