Why do teams struggle to play against ten men?

After watching Wolves fail to make any real impression against Manchester United in their Carling Cup tie last week, and after seeing it time and time again, I was wondering, why do teams struggle to play against ten men, especially those teams who are behind or level when they get the man advantage?
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Wigan did a good job against Chelsea at the weekend, but that was a slightly different scenario in that Chelsea had to attack to try and salvage something from the game so Wigan always had space to move the ball into, which makes things a lot easier.
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It should be easy playing against ten men, in theory, as you should always have a man in space and be able to keep the opposition moving, tiring them out and making it easier to create scoring opportunities.
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In practise, however, it doesn’t quite work like that. Teams routinely struggle to break down teams who have lost a man, and some teams even lose to ten men, like Wolves. Almost everyone says it’s hard to play against ten men when you have to force the pace of the game in order to get a result. Why?
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Here’s my take on why teams struggle to attack effectively against ten men when they need to get a goal:
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Teams who have had a man dismissed usually switch tactics and play with most, if not all, of their players behind the ball for the remainder of the game. This makes it difficult for teams to find any space in the final third of the pitch and makes goalscoring chances scarce.
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Also, watching Tottenham against Man Utd earlier this season, Spurs made the mistake that many teams make in that situation. They played far too directly. Instead of working the ball around the area and getting out wide, a tactic that was working very well, they started knocking the ball into the area at every opportunity toward Peter Crouch. The problem was that because there were so many men behind the ball, the area was extremely congested, so that even if a Spurs player had met the initial ball into the box, there was just no space for the ball to be knocked down to another attacker. All Spurs did was make it easy for Man Utd to defend what should have been a tough situation for them. The way to prevent this is to make the defence move around by stretching the play, then exploit the space that has been created.
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Also there is the mental aspect to consider. The attacking team must lose a bit of focus, as they know that they don’t have to work with the same intensity, so they don’t. The defending team however, has that siege mentality that always helps to get a little bit extra out of all the players. Mentally, I believe that a red card helps the team who have lost a player, rather than the team with a man advantage.
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I may be wrong here but I’ve always thought that when playing against a team with fewer players, you should really raise the tempo your team plays at in order to try and tire the opposition and thus increase the chances of forcing them into a mistake or concentration lapse that could provide an opportunity to score. Not enough sides do this in my opinion.
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Lets be honest here, more often than not the conventional methods teams use to play against ten men do not work. Isn’t it time to try something different?